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,123219 



AUG 1903 



Received - 






** FOURTH OF JULY AT ** 

** NOME. ** 

** Although the gold seekers ** 

** of the North are thousands ** 

** of miles from "God's coun- ** 

** try," they have not forgot- ** 

** ten that they are American ** 

** citizens on American soil. ** 

** Two or three companies of ** 

** regulars, the local fire brig- ** 

** ade, a miners' band, and ** 

** prominent citizens partici- ** 

** pate in a parade that makes ** 

** the lonesome miner feel ** 

** quite at home. Games and ** 

** speeches are indulged ** 

** in in the afternoon and the ** 

** eagle spreads gloriously. ** 

— With San Francisco News Letter, 
July 5, 1902. 



Price, 10c per copy. ? / J > ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 185B. 



Annual Subscription, 14.00 




t *N r J*§g*»*e<» 







Vol. LXV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 5, 1902. 



Number 1. 



The 9*n Pranciaoo NEWS LETTER Is printed and Published every Satur 
day by the proprietor, Frederick Marriott, Ilalleck building, .T3) Simsome 
street. San Francisco, Cal 

Eatered at San Francisco Postofflco as secoiul-olass matter. 

New York office.— i where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tions and advertising) 3sJ Broadway, C. C. .Murphy 'epresenlatlve 

London office— 30 Cornhlll, E. 0. England, George Street & Co. represents* 
tire. 

Boston — 36 Bloomfiehl street, W. H. Daggett representative. 

Ail soc'al items, announcements, advertising or other matter. Intended lor 
pub icatlon in the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be sent 
to this office not later than 5 p. m. Thur&day previous to day of Issue, 

As the owl-car system extends to different lines so do the 
excuses for being out late increase in variety. 



Even Yorke and the Gaelic League have been too decent 
to insult King Edward in his hour of suffering. 



Now that the Panama route has been decided upon, all 
that we need is patience and about fifty years time. 



The suspension of military rule in the Philippines makes 
the Fourth of July sufficiently glorious for the gu-gu. 



President Roosevelt's neckwear may be somewhat crazy, 
cut no one can complain so long as his headpiece remains 
sound. 



Society at large is relieved to find that the 400 caught 
in a Colorado Springs Railroad wreck were not the 400 of 
any particular city. 



The 4,000 coffins which the transport Kilpatrick is bearing 
to the Philippines are silent reminders that war is hell, 
even in our enlightened time. 



San Francisco would not trade its possibility of earth- 
quakes and volcanic eruptions for the grim reality of hurri- 
canes and cyclones now raging in St. Louis. 



Carrie Nation has joined Faker Alexander Dowie, the 
healer, who, she says, has cured her. This is the first inti- 
mation that Dowie heals disordered brains. 



St. Louis, in stopping the Corbett-Sullivan prize fight, has 
set an example that San Francisco could follow if she would, 
but wouldn't if she could. 



In marrying Lady Edith Villiers Mr. Waldorf Astor may not 
gain a title, but he will get into good English society, which 
is all the senior W. W. has ever prayed for. 



The editors of the last "Blue and Gold" turned out a book 
that is a thing of beauty and will be a joy forever — but 
unluckily the bills for the same promise to be a nuisance 
forever. 



It is announced that a Washington millionaire, seventy-one 
years old, has married a young bride "on the quiet." The 
divorce case will probably stir up enough noise to balance 
things. 



"Professor" Kretz, a Reading hypnotist, 
to be buried in a coffin under six feet of, 
experiment a rain storm came up and 
"Professor." Sensible people in that re: 
more rain. 



The New York Board of Education has paid the teachers' 

salaries a month in advance. The San Francisco teachers 
have always felt lucky if their pay was less than six months 
in arrears. 



Judging from the sad tales of bad little boys coming 
from school teachers in Porto Rico, a low tariff on switches, 
paddles and rattan canes should be declared in Uncle Sam- 
uel's new acquisition. 



The enlistment term of Louis Harris, the soldier who so 
cold-bloodedly shot Nicholas Beck, expired July 4th. Prob- 
ably Harris had never killed his man, and wanted to put 
one to his record before quitting his martial career. 



Preacher-Convict Joe King, in a habeas corpus demand for 
liberty, says that he is not willing to await his trial. King's 
keepers, however, are showing a patience which the Evan- 
gelist should have learned during his religious education. 



Mayor Schmitz made a speech before railway employees 
at Sacramento last week. The speech boiled down was: 
Join the union and Vote for Me. The Join the Union was 
plainly stated, but the Vote for Me was said by implication. 



There is quite a disturbance over two children of Christian 
Science parents who died of diphtheria in Washington, 
through non-medical attendance. But the case has its re- 
deeming features — they might have grown up to be faith 
curists themselves. 



. W. H. Schumah, who gave Robert Lawless $75 as part 
payment on a race-horse, which was never produced, has 
had Lawless arrested. That's a bad case of ingratitude. Any 
man who is out only $75 on a race horse should congratulate 
himself. 



The illness of King Edward has raised the usual storm of 
dispute among the doctors. The principal fact stands out 
tnat the monarch's physicians pulled him through, so criti- 
cism from the non-attending medicos comes in very poor 
taste. 



Mr. De Witt Williams Bisbee, the Berkeley student who 
has discovered a means whereby a dozen people can talk 
over a party line without interruption, may be regarded 
not only as an inventor, but as a nerve specialist to whom 
thousands of sufferers may be thankful. 



Mr. Pike Clough, seventy years of age, who was knocked 
down and beaten by the dog-catcher to whom he refused to 
give up a pup, is old enough to know that dog-catchers are 
brutes who will beat anybody or anything that is helpless. 
They are like small-pox or bubonic plague — it is better to 
run away from them than to face them. 




Joseph Ryan, although a bartender in a Barbary Coast 
saloon, is no gentleman. He threw Jessie Martinez bodily 
out of his saloon on account of a dispute over some drinks, 
arbary Coast etiquette demands that a bartender shall 
rst politely request a lady to leave his place, and then, 
if she refuses, he should take her by the ear and gently lead 
her out. But throw her out — never! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 



SOME MUNICIPAL OWNERSHIP FACTS. 

The charter provides that the Supervisors, before submit- 
ting to the electors any proposition for the acquisition of a 
public utility must solicit offers for the sale to the city of 
the existing utilities. Acting under this provision, the Board 
of Supervisors have solicited from all of the street railroads 
of the city an offer for-the sale to the city of their respective 
properties. In response to this action of the Board, Mr. 
Newhall, President of the Presidio and Ferries Company, 
has stated that they would often to sell their road to uhe 
city. 

Can a street railroad sell all of its property and fran- 
chises? The Supreme Court of the United States has laid 
down the rule that a quasi-public corporation cannot sell 
all of its property and thereby disable itself from performing 
the duties prescribed by its charter. This ruling was laid 
down in the case of the Central Transportation Company vs. 
the Pullman Palace Car Company, 139th U. S. Rep., p. 24. 
In this case the Court said: "Neither the grant of the fran- 
chise to transport passengers nor the general authority to 
sell and dispose of property empowers the grantee, while it 
continues to exist as a corporation, to sell or to lease its 
entire property and franchise to another corporation." 

It therefore follows that this provision of the Charter is 
useless, because none of the street railroad corporations 
could sell all of their property to the city, even should they 
so desire. 

The mere fact that the Charter authorizes the city to buy 
does not remedy this defect in the power of the corporations 
to sell. The Supreme Court of the United States, in the 
case of the Louisville National Railroad against Kentucky, 
held that it was not only necessary that there should be 
a party competent to buy, but also that there should be a 
party competent to sell, and that therefore, in the purchase 
of the property of one railroad corporation by another, it 
was not only necessary that the purchasing corporation 
should be competent to buy. but that the selling corporation 
should be competent to sell. 

It therefore follows that this action on the part of the 
Supervisors in the soliciting offers from these corporations 
is a more useles thing than the Supervisors thought. They, 
of course, did not expect to purchase any of the street rail- 
roads, and had no intention of purchasing them if they 
could. It turns out, however, that even if they wanted to 
purchase them, they cou.d not get a good title to any of 
the property in the purchase. This, however, is in line with 
all business attempted by municipalities. 



THE NECESSITY FOR STRICTER QUARANTINE 
REGULATIONS. 

At a time when we are trying to dismiss a competent 
Board of Health from office, the necessity arises for stricter 
regulations in regard to health and quarantine regulations 
than ever arose before. The reports of mortality in the 
Philippines, to say nothing of Hongkong, Yokohama, Hono- 
lulu and Sidney, justify very grave apprehensions, such as 
are said to be felt by the Boards of Health and Governors of 
those localities. Ninety American soldiers have died of 
cholera at Manila within a few weeks, and a score of the 
deaths have been credited to a single week. The percentage 
of mortality to cases reported is very large. In Manila, 
1,236 deaths to 1,530 cases. In the whole of Luzon, 5,440 
deaths to 7,300 cases. Who shall say that such a decimat- 
ing plague is not to be dreaded in San Francisco? If it 
had not been for our strong winds during the winter months 
we should have had the bubonic plague and cholera here 
long ago. As far south as Australia, and as near home as 
Honolulu, they had those awfully contagious diseases long 
ago. In the mere fear that they will reach Sydney again 
the sewers have been opened and fumigated; the tenement 



houses along the city front have been emptied of their ten- 
ants, and the harbor has been dragged by vast iron nets 
in order to draw the sewerages and the germs of the disease 
out into the open ocean. We get steamers every few days 
from one or all of these ports, and they are met by the 
loosest quarantine ever established at this or any other 
great commercial port. Yet because we have a Chinese quar- 
ter, located in our midst that maintains that filth which 
receives and breeds disease, and because we have a few 
steamship lines that kick against any possible chance of 
being quarantined, we must take chances that no port aroun.l 
the Pacific dares to take. If our Board of Health winked 
at these things it would deserve to be kicked out of office. 
But it has endeavored to do its duty, and for that reason 
a pliant Mayor in the hands of the powers that be, has de- 
termined it shall go. San Francisco's tolerance of plague 
ships is giving it a bad name all over the maritime world. 



BRYAN STILL A MARPLOT. 
William Jennings Bryan will not have harmony in the 
Democratic party at any price. He recently announced 
that he would not again be a candidate for the Presidency. 
This was pretty generally taken to mean that he would 
for the present, at any rate, retire from active participation 
in politics, and leave the way clear for a more promising 
candidate in 1904. This moved a number of the leading 
Democrats of the country to try to get together and har- 
monize for future action. The outlook was promising. 
Leaders of undoubted popularity and strength gave in their 
adhesion to the movement, and the great banquet in New 
York, attended by such men as Grover Cleveland and David 
Bennett Hill, was one of the happy results. Inspiring 
speeches were made, great hopes were indulged in, and 
the hatchet seemed to be buried then and there. But Bryan 
was not there; he had been taken at his word as to his 
retirement, and was not deemed a harmonizer anyway. That 
estimate of him proved to be an eminently correct one. 
The voices of the speekers had only been stilled a few hours 
when Bryan hied himself to the most unscrupulous organs 
of the opposite party he could find, and had himself inter- 
viewed for the purpose of sowing as much discord in the 
Democratic party as his malicious tongue could find words 
to express. His interviews were singularly mischief-making 
in their character, and could have been designed for no 
other purpose. Surely Mr. Bryan owes the Democratic party 
enough to leave it alone to get back to where he found it. 
if it can. It is not good for the country that it should be 
without a second party capable of carrying on the Govern- 
ment, if need be. A strong opposition to the party in power 
is a desideratum under every representative Government. 
The course that Mr. Bryan is taking at this time stamps 
him as a malicious marplot, a faithless Democrat, and an 
unpatriotic citizen. 



REGULATING WATER AND GAS RATES. 
Constitutional amendment number 28 will appear on the 
ballots used at the election which takes place in November 
next. It provides a different and better way than that which 
now exists for fixing water and gas charges. The proceed- 
ing is to be changed from a partisan to a judicial one. The 
present method is utterly indefensible from any standpoint. 
It offers no guarantee that the rates will be just and equi- 
table to either side. The Supervisors are under the temp- 
tation, which they have not always been able to resist, of 
cinching either the companies or the taxpayers. There have 
been "solid nines" time out of mind, whose function it was 
to pass ordinances over the Mayor's vetoes, and for a ccn- 
sideration to do justice to the companies. Then, again, there 
have been Boards of Supervisors pledged up to their eyes 
to do wrong. That is to say, they gave pledges in order 
to secure their election, to so reduce water and gas rates 



July 5, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



as to leave the stockholders no possible chance of • arnlng 
a fair dividend. That was constituting consumers judge 
and Jury in their own cause, the very thing the law intended 
to avert. The Supervisors were to act judicially and upon 
the evidence submitted to them, but, as a rule, that was 
something beyond them, even when their inclinations were 
that way. To this day thy have not reached a conclusion as 
to the capital value of either the gas or water works. As 
a result, they have gone on fixing charges by a sort of rule 
of thumb. There never could have been any accuracy when 
they failed to ascertain the just dues of the stockholders, 
most of whom are. and always have been, local people. One 
political party has bid against the other in order to catch 
votes and win. The use of these public utilities has been 
put up to a kind of Dutch auction, the party that bid the 
lowest carrying off the prize. This state of things has too 
long led to scandals in our municipal life. It has benefited 
nobody, save a few purcnasable Supervisors into whose 
hands the power to cinch ought never to have been placed. 
A great deal of capital can yet be beneficially employed in 
public utilities in and around San Francisco, but before 
it is, capital must be protected against cinches, and the 
fixing of rates must be taken out of politics. The proposed 
constitutional amendment has that for its object. 



THE KING RECOVERING. 

Unless some unexpected and untoward event takes place, 
King Edward VII's recovery is now as certain as anything 
human can be. His responsible and capable physicians have 
pronounced him out of all immediate danger. Of course, the 
dressing of the wound caused by the operation gives some 
pain still, but that is a favorable sign. If there were any 
pus or blood poisoning the sensation would be deadened, 
and the pain slight. The tenderness of the flesh is evidence 
that the healing process is taking place, and that all is 
well with the patient, who has borne up wonderfully well 
under the circumstances. So have the Queen and the royal 
family. So, likewise, have the royal visitors, the ambassa- 
dors, the peers and peeresses, and all who were in London 
in expectation of witnessing the most gorgeous spectacle 
of modern times. The coronation has been postponed; not 
abandoned. King Edward will not disappoint his subjects 
nor those of his visitors who can find it convenient to re- 
turn again in August or September. He will go through the 
ceremonies, if only to put an end to talk about Gypsies and 
soothsayers. He is not a superstitionist of that kind, and 
will gladly do whatever in him lies to put an end to it. 
He will go to his throne "every inch a King," and will live 
out his time. 



rocks have been discovered that appeared on no chart, it 
Is obvious that a new survey of the whole region Is ni 
Navigation Is increasing by leaps and bounds between 
Seattle. Nome and the Yukon, and it carries a precious 
freight, in human lives and in precious metal. We cannot 
do too much to safeguard our growing commerce in that 
region. An old captain, now at Nome, who for many years 
navigated that region in search of whales, gives a descrip- 
tion of Behring Sea, and makes a suggestion as to how it 
should be guarded. He says there are varying currents at 
its entrance which, if a ship once enter, she is carried along, 
into the ice floes, where nothing but strong timbers and good 
luck can save her. He suggests that the United States Gov- 
ernment should keep a powerful steam cutter stationed in 
the neighborhood in order to warn vessels of the direction 
the currents are taking, and of the whereabouts of the ice 
floes. The suggestion seems to be a good one, which our 
representatives may well take up and bring to official notice. 
At the same time, our ship owners should build a special 
class of vessels for the North. They need to be built so as 
to be able to take some hard knocks and to resist the 
squeezing of the ice. 



THE LOST STEAMERS. 

The steamers Portland and Jeanie, which were missing for 
a time, and about whose safety great fears w>ere entertained, 
have been sighted, stuck fast in the ice at the entrance of 
Behring Sea. They were able to signal that all were well 
on board. As many of the passengers were from San Fran- 
cisco, and had families here, the ending of their suspense 
was a gratification to everybody. The ships were caught 
in the ice on the 17th of June, and nothing was heard of 
them until the last day of that month.when they were 
sighted by a vessel outside of the ice barrier. They have 
not been, and cannot be, released at present. But the ice 
is breaking up, and it is believed they will escape all right. 
Besides, the United States cutter Thetis is standing by, 
ready to extend relief in case of need. All is well that ends 
well. 

But the condition needs to be improved. Altogether too 
many vessels are lost on the voyage between here and 
Alaska, and something ought to be done about it. Although 
the coast is irregular, there are but few lighthouses. They 

could he quadrupled with advantage. As so many hidden 



SHALL WE SELL THE PHILIPPINES? 

A distinguished officer of the army recently returned from 
Manila earnestly advocates our sale of the Philippine Is- 
lands to. the Japanese for a good' round sum, and it has to 
be confessed that he makes out a better case for his pro- 
posal than at the first sight seemed possible. He says we 
shall never wholly control the natives except by extermina- 
ting them. They will never assimilate with Americans or 
adopt our ways, or settle down to our routine of work. 
Their land is not a white' man's country, and our race would 
degenerate there in time. To continue to hold a sort of 
possessatory title to the islands we shall have to keep an ex- 
pensive standing army there for an indefinite period, and 
that without any adequate return. What we want, and all 
we want of the Philippines is the coal fields of Cebu, and 
a naval station near by. The right to these we should, of 
course, reserve to ourselves in any trade we might make 
with Japan. The Japanese need the islands, whilst we do 
not. They must soon get an outlet somewhere for their 
overcrowded population. They are close to the Philippines, 
are the same kind of little brown men, their minds are cast 
in the same oriental mold, and there is little doubt that 
they would get along well together. Long before we had 
cast covetous eyes in that direction, the Japanese had deter- 
mined to acquire the Philippines, either by purchase or 
conquest, and if we had kept our hands off they would pro- 
bably have been there by this time. We should be rid of 
what President Roosevelt calls "a burden," if they were 
there in the near future. We could probably sell them for a 
good round sum, say $150,000,000, with deferred payments. 
Our government has no present need for the money, and 
could well afford to let it stand for a number of years, on 
the payment of a low rate of interest. The Japanese are 
a people who deserve well of civilization in general, and of 
the United States in particular. We were the first to force 
open their barred doors, and to carry trade and commerce 
into their harbors, and they are now so well pleased that 
we did that they keep the anniversary of the event as a na- 
tional holiday. They are a friendly nation, whose power 
for good in the Orient is incalculable. They have every dis- 
position to act in co-operation with us, and it would as- 
suredly he a good stroke of policy to reciprocate that feeling 
by letting them have the Philippines at a price. There is 
much im the suggestion which merits all the consideration 
our Government and people can give it. A nation willing 
to pay our price for the Philippines could learn all it pleased 
of "benevolent assimilation." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 



Reminiscences No. 15 



By an Old Newspaper Man. 

California early started out to cut 
California's First a wide swath in national politics, 
Senator. but proved unfortunate in her ambi- 

tions. With little delay she was ad- 
mitted to the union as an independent and sovereign State, 
and forthwith John C. Fremont, the "Pathfinder," who had 
made his way across the plains just in time to save the 
Golden State from falling into the clutches of the Mexicans 
on the one side and the British on the other, took his seat 
as Senator from California. His successful adventure had 
made him popular in the East as well as in the West. His 
name was one to conjure with at that time, and that he 
should have been given the highest honor at its disposal 
by the State he had saved, was but natural. Soon thereafter 
the newly-formed Republican party made him its first nomi- 
nee for President of the United States. He made a good 
run, and paved the way for future successes, but was him- 
self beaten by James Buchanan, whose weakness is pretty 
generally credited with having brought on the Civil War. 
Fremont retired from the Senate in order to take a com- 
mand tendered to him by President Lincoln, but he proved 
a failure in that capacity, and soon resigned in a pet be- 
cause of the harsh criticisms of him by officers and men 
alike. He retired to private life for a time, but was ulti- 
mately given the Governorship of the then wild and lawless 
territory of Arizona, but made a record that alienated most 
of his remaining friends. It is now thought that he was 
more sinned against than sinning. He put through, and 
as Governor, signed the Southern Pacific's franchises, but 
he soon died in straitened circumstances. If there was 
money made jn that deal, it is certain that he did not 
make it His widow subsequently received a small pension 
from the National Government, with the consent and appro- 
val of the entire American people. Mrs. Fremont (nee 
Jessie Benton) was at the time of her marriage, the pet o£ 
Washington society, the apple of her father's eye, and as all 
the world loves a lover, Captain Fremont's devotion to the 
great Senator's daughter was long a cherished American ro- 
mance. 

"Duke" Gwin was sent to keep 
Senator Gwin Fails to General John C. Fremont corn- 
Take California into pany as California's second Sena- 
the War. tor. As national figures, for the 

time being, the two men did not. 
compare. The Pathfinder was at the height of his popularity 
and there was nothing the country contained that was es- 
teemed too good for him. Dr. Gwin, on the other hand, was 
little known outside of the Southern wing of the Democratic 
party, who, however, had sized their man up thoroughly, and 
had made no mistake about him. As astute a politician as 
ever framed a platform to catch votes, or ever made a cam- 
paign speech, or led a party to victory, he was quite at home 
in the Senate. The Southern leaders came to have great 
confidence in his judgment, and his influence on the events 
preceding the war was considerable. Perhaps his supreme 
desire was to keep California in line with the South. The 
State was pretty equally divided politically, and it was 
tnought that the better management of the Southerners 
would give them the advantage. But it was not to he. The 
tide turned, and California cast in her lot with the Union. 
Dr. Gwin went to the front, took service with the confed- 
eracy, and was deemed a useful man in several capacities. 
When the war ended he went to Mexico, joined Maximillian's 
forces, was received with much distinction, decorated with 
a Dukedom, and barely escaped with his life when his royal 
master was caught and shot. "The Duke," as he was ironi- 
cally called by his countrymen, returned to California for 
a time, but soon accepted a position from the Southern 
Pacific railroad to serve in Washington as a lobbyist. Dr. 



Hwin died a number of years ago in fair circumstances, and 
nonored by a wide circle of friends, but, though he more than 
once sought political power, he never could again attain 
to it. Thus the State proved unfortunate in the choice 
of both of her first Senators, and there are those who hold 
that her ill-luck continued. 

The two Senators who soon 
Col. E. D. Baker Recalled, followed General John C. 

Fremont and Dr. Gwin from 
California, met violent deaths, one on the "field of honor," 
in name only, and the other in the best sense of the term. 
The latter, Col. E. D. Baker, was probably the most eloquent 
man who ever represented California in any capacity, and 
his patriotism was as pronounced as his eloquence. With- 
out resigning his seat in the Senate, he went to the front, 
when the battle of Bull Run was raging, only to be brought 
back to Washington a corpse. He fought like a hero, died 
as a brave soldier would wish to die, and set the young men 
of his country an example which they were thereafter swift 
to follow. The entire country mourned his loss, and San 
Francisco erected a monument in his honor which will for- 
ever remain one of the land-marks of the city. Portions of 
his speeches have been printed in text books and are read. 
recited and admired wherever the English language in all 
its force and purity is appreciated. Poor Baker went to his 
grave all too soon! The country had further need of him. 
Yet his early taking-off taught the lesson that the sacrifice 
of even the brightest and best must be made if the inter- 
ests of the country called for it. The death of Colonel 
Baker brought home to Congress the stern realities of the 
war, and aroused the patriotism of the country as scarcely 
any other event could have done. It was a sad blow to Cali- 
fornia, and rendered her terribly in earnest in raising men 
and money for the conflict. She is proud to-day that she 
gave her best to the country's cause. 

Senator David Broderlck was 
Senator Broderick as Colonel Baker's colleague, but 
a "Mudsill." they could never have been con- 

genial ones. It would be difficult 
to imagine two men more unlike. Baker was the scholar 
and gentleman in politics; Broderick was in himself, and 
tried to represent what he was pleased to call "the mudsill 
of society." Men with money, he contended, walked over 
the proletariat as so many mudsills on which men have a 
right to wipe their boots when they want to. He was a 
stone mason by trade, was trained to politics in the low 
wards of Boston, ran with the machine, and made politics 
the principal business of his life. He was a Democrat, 
but favored the war. His appeals to the labor elements 
Drought him most of the support which sent him to tne 
Senate. In an evil hour for himself he forgot that his posi- 
tion as a Senator of the United States demanded a deport- 
ment very different from that which he was accustomed to 
treat his hod-carriers. At the principal hotel in Washing- 
ton, and in the presence of a number of prominent Califor- 



THE HUB 

CHAS. KEILUS A CO. 

EXCLUSIVE HIGH-GRADE CLOTHIERS 
On merit alone our 

OUTING SUITS 

claim your attention 



132 



KEARNY STREET 
THURLOW BLOCK 



July S. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



niana. he applied language to the Chief Justice of this 
State, whlrh no man In those days submittal to without 
calling his trailucer to account. Uroderick was called out 
!>>• the late David S. Terry, and they fought nt the DP 
day near the Alms HoOM site In this city, in the p 
numerous friends of both parties. Brodorii k was hit and 
died within three days. It wus esteemed an honorable death, 
hut times have changed, and it would be considered an Ig- 
noble one now. "Dying on the field of honor" sounds 
well, but It has got to be true to be worth repeating. Colonel 
K. D. Baker. In very truth, died on the field of honor, and the 
gratitude of the nation will be his forever. Broderick's 
case is another illustration that California's luck does not 
run In the matter of United States Senators. 

California has also been quite un- 

The Early Demise fortunate in the death of many of her 

of Senators. Senators whilst serving their first 

terms. They are more in number 
than we can at this moment recall. James T. Farley, Gen- 
era] Miller. George Hearst, and Leland Stanford are names 
that occur to everybody's mind, but there were others. 
Eugene Casserly. if we remember rightly, just managed 
to outlive his term. He was one of the few Senators Cali- 
fornia has ever had who came up to the mental stature ex- 
pected of Senators in the older Eastern States. A clear 
and logical thinker and a ready speaker, with a pleasant 
and expressive face, he soon ranked among the first half 
dozen men of influence in the Senate. He sat on the Demo- 
cratic side, and being a sound constitutional lawyer, he 
proved a useful adviser to his associates during the critical 
period that followed the war. Farley, Miller and Hearst 
were all most estimable citizens, but were out of place in 
the Senate of the nation. They all came by their positions 
through the use of their own or of somebody else's money. 
Milton S. Latham came by his seat in most sensational fash- 
ion. Inaugurated Governor of California in the morning, 
he was chosen by the Legislature United States Senator in 
the afternoon, resigned the Governorship the next day, and 
on the day following that was on his way to Washington, 
via Panama. Elected as a Democrat, he took part in the 
debates preliminary to the war, but was not a success, al- 
though great things had been expected of him. He left the 
Senate a disappointed man, and soon turned up in San 
Francisco as the agent of a London bank, which he wrecked, 
and then died a sadly disgruntled death. California's 
square Senatorial holes are still being filled by round pegs, 
and with the dailies in full cry for theiri pets, we are likely 
to go from bad to worse. 



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sitting or reclining. The highest taste has been shown in 
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ceilings, with which the carpets and upholstery match per- 
fectly. The traveling branch of the Book-Lovers Library in 
the composite car will prove a great convenience, as mem- 
bers can take a book onto the train, exchange it there, and 
take another with them when they leave. Telephone ser- 
vice by special wire is provided up to the hour of depart- 
ure at the terminals, a special operator being in attendance 
in the observation car at the rear of the train. The train 
leaves San Francisco at 10:00 a. m., daily, and reaches Chi- 
cago in three days. Secure descriptive booklet at Southern 
Pacific Information Bureau. 613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you'll save at least one-third on your fuel bill. 
'Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will receive 
prompt attention. 



Surprise at the good mercantile lunches served in San 

Francisco will be increased if you try the lunch served by 
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It cannot be excelled. 




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BUCHANAN BROS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento St., S. F. Tel., 661 

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automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1897 

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(LID.) OF ABERDEEN, 

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importers • MACONDRAY & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 



5>6e Automobile 



Tne Automobile Club of California, 415 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Main 934. Officers: Mr. F. A. 
Hyde, President; Dr. F. J. Tillman, Vice-President; Mr. A. 
C. Aiken, Secretary; Mr. Byron Jackson, Treasurer. 

The run last Sunday to Mission San Jose was very suc- 
cessful, there being twenty-five machines from this city and 
Oakland, and twenty from San Jose. The local contingent 
was under the direction of the Touring Committee: Mr. E. 
P. Bruguiere, Chairman; Mr. H. Courtney Ford, and Mr. 
George H. Whitney. 

Automobile Club of San Jose. 

Mr. E. T. Sterling, President; Mr. B. D. Merchant, Sec- 
retary; General Executive Committee: Messrs. Frank Coy- 
kendall. Harry Bercovich, Charles Chrisman, E. T. Sterling, 
and B. D. Merchant. 

• • m 

News notes and personal items relating to motor carriages 
will be published in this column when properly verified. 

• * • 

Automobiling is a royal sport, and may be classed with 
yachting and other sports indulged in by sport-loving per- 
sons of means. The wealth and intelligence of a city may 
be measured by the number of motor carriages in use, and 
as by the first of next year fully a thousand motor carriages 
will he in use in and around this city, it may be observed 
that San Francisco and Oakland will compare favorably with 
older cities. 
•The demand for automobiles far exceeds the supply; 
some of the local agencies have no cars on hand, and can fill 
no orders for some time. One agency reports a carload of 
autos en route which are already sold. The demand for 
touring machines and run-about vehicles of the motor class 
is so heavy that the factories have no opportunities to make 
motor vehicles for business purposes — that is, delivery wag- 
ons, milk wagons, trucks, etc. 

The average man wants an auto-car that possesses speed : 
even if he seldom lets his machines out, he likes to know 
that speed is there. Autos are something like blooded horses 
— not much valued unless speedy. 

Recently a French machine that had an express train 
record was sold in England for $17,000. Autos, too. have 
pedigrees and records like racers, and a machine with a 
certified record is always sure to bring two or three times 
its catalogue price. 

Some country districts have been disturbed by the auto 
carriages, and foolish restrictions imposed. Auto car drivers 
will simply taboo such sections, and take their machines 
and money into some more appreciative section. Farmers 
should remember that horses are only frightened once at 
automobiles, and that motor carriages are here to stay, and. 
furthermore, that the horseless vehicle is the great final 
factor which will demand and obtain good roads from one 
end of the land to the other. 

And by the time the era of good roads is here, the farmer 
will haul his produce to market behind his motor farm 



We quots the following from the Automobile and 
Motor Review of June J4th, J902, page 4: 

Summarizing the resu Its secured vsilh (he 'WHITE' 
"steam carriage B— 65 in the Memorial Day endurance run, its 
"steam generating system combined with the condenser made 
"possible a run of 100 miles on six gallons of water and 5% gal- 
lons of gasoline, as against an average of 95% gallons of water 
"and 13 gallons of gasoline for all other blue ribbon steam car- 
riages and an average of 61.; gallons of gasoline for all blue rib- 
"bon hydro carbon vehicles." 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY 

300 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
C. A. Hawkins, General Agent. 



wagon; and furthermore, motor freight wagon trains will 
then make their regular trips over country roads, thus 
solving the question of transportation in remote districts. 
Undoubtedly the automobile will cause a revolution in 
many lines of industry, and assist greatly in developing 
our great Western resources. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Whnlow's Soothing 

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14 'HChtl STMtT, S. F., CAL. 



July 5, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




"The I.ate Returning" by Margery 
A Rattling Good Story. Williams, Is located presumably 
in some South American Repub- 
lic. At any rate, a spasmodic little revolution, such as is 
always taking place in our sister continent, is the main 
theme of the story. The whole tale doesn't cover much 
more than a week's time, but into it the author has crowded 
a record of stirring events, a love story and a tragedy in 
a manner refreshingly skillful. She has handled her story 
with consummate art, vigor and directness — with a style 
distinctive, original, crisp, terse and lucid. Deft touches 
here and there define the characters. There is no attempt 
to draw word portraits of any of them, but they develop 
with the tale, and before it is finished, the different person- 
ages stand out clear and distinct in the reader's mind. She 
does not tell when or where this revolution took place, 
because her story telling instinct informs her that it does 
not matter. Seven or eight people were the principal 
characters in a little comic opera squirt of a revolution, and 
it is only with them that she has to deal — and she does it 
with a dramatic rush that keeps the attention chained. 

Vanda Rome, a former actress, one of the "people," is 
a chief character. The President of the Republic, Vallier, 
had taken her under his protection, and she had grown to 
hate the people from whom she sprung — particularly Hilary 
Rainer, leader of the revolution. But when the people fall 
before the Government troops, when women and children 
are shot, blood tells, and she goes back to her own — particu- 
larly to Hilary Rainer. The revolution fails, and — read it 
yourself and find out their fate. 

Vanda is a character to be rememhered — a fierce, beautiful, 
ungovernable girl, of strong passions and instincts, brave 
as a lion. Little attention is given by the author to Rainer, 
but her literary skill makes one like this revolutionist with 
out knowing exactly who or what he is. The pages de- 
scribing their journey toward the seacoast are beautifully 
written, tender and pathetic. 

Two newspapermen, Heffernan, the editor, and Carter, 
the reporter, are much mixed up in this rebellion "agin the 
Government," and stand out boldly through the pages — 
admirable types, both of them, and well-drawn. So is the 
easy-going, rose-loving American Consul, so hard to con- 
vince that there is really a revolution. 

Struggers, an Englishman, and the Consul's retainer, opens 
the story in this wise: 

"An' come around 'ere, they did, eleven o'clock Friday 
night, an' woke us all up to tell us to illoominate. An' the 
Consul, 'e went out 'ere on the balcony an' talked to 'em. 
I did wisht it 'ad 'a bin me, onct. I'd 'ave illoominated 'em! 
I'd 'ave talked to 'em proper! They'd 'ave wanted a peace 
treaty by the time I got through! 'Illoominate?' I'd 'ave 
said — 'illoominate? Oh, go 'ome!' I'd 'ave said — 'go 'ome; 
yer fair make me sick!' A silly set of rotters as don't 
know what they are cheerin' about 'alf the time! If I'd 
'a bin the Consul, I'd 'ave said somethin' to 'em; I'd ave 
given em fits. Silly rotters! 'Ark to 'em now! You might 
think they'd got 'olt of something to be 'appy about, mightn't 
you?" 

Here is a little touch of battle: 

"The electric light gleamed on his silver shoulder-straps 
as he stood there a second, his head flung back, poised 
against the darkness. He had a boyish, excited face. There 
was the flash of steel swung upward in the hand of one of 



the Insurgents. She could see the sure, measured curve 
of the man's wrist Tin- blow Ought the boyish soldier 
under the jaw, splitting through the bone, and he doubled 
qunintly, as though someone had caught his ankles from be- 
hind." 

That sounds like a man's writing, as, in fact, does the 
whole hook. 

The Macmillan Co., New York. Price, $1.25. 

To add to this year's generous 

Sonnets of Description crop of Pacific Coast poetry, pub- 

Rather than of Heart, lished on the Pacific Coast, comes 

a book of verse, mostly sonnets, 

by Christian Binkley. The book is called "The House of 

Days," and is up to the publisher's standard. Mr. Binkley 

has approached the nature sonnet in the modern spirit of 

realism with some success. Note the following; 

A Harvest Evening. 

The West is glowing redder than a rose, 

The swallows wheel and wheel. Down the long lane, 
Swaying and creaking with its weight of grain 

The wagon laden with the harvest goes. 

Fainter the sound of wheels and tramping grows; 
The cedar gloom surrounds them; like a door 
It closes; all is still ... on oaken floor 

A tramp of hoofs . . . Silence . . . The West still glows. 

The cattle leave the barn and slowly pass 
Through the wide bars into the meadow grass; 

Upon the crimson of the pool beyond, 
Their shadows fall, The boy puts up the bars, 

Then stands upon the border of the pond; 
And lo, the glitter of the first faint stars. 



And this: 



Remembered Shade. 



As one that from the dust and glare of noon 
Enters a pathway dark with fragrant bowers 
Where drooping branches are and shrubs and flowers, 

And vines voluptuous are in long festoon, 

And there, with birds and water songs in tune, 
Twining the maiden-hair and violets, 
The weary way before him quite forgets 

Until he sees the glare again — too soon; 

So I, in my highnoon of life, have staid 
In pleasant paths of love an hour or two, 
Forgetting all and seeing all anew, 

And hearkening all music that was made, — 
But now the long bare highway I pursue 

With nought to cheer me but remembered shade. 

While I regret that time-tried device of poets, "flowers" 
and "bowers," "noon" and "tune," I think that there is more 
of worth in the latter sonnet than in the former, in that 
there is more of humanity and less of description. Nature, 
wholly without the human, the personal touch, the expres- 
sion of opinion and feeling, cannot wholly satisfy, however 
great a tour de force the work may be in a descriptive sense. 
Mr. Binkley's book is not a tour de force, for his vocabulary 
is limited and his expression sometimes crude; he has, 
moreover, entered a field which has been well trodden by 
the small and great. His sonnets are, however, smooth and 
compact; they paint pictures and do little to offend the ear. 

A. M. Robertson, San Francisco. 



A Mother's Milk 
is the problem for infants. The growing child has ever 
changing needs, but a perfect milk can never go amiss. 
Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is the acme of sub- 
stitute feeding. Send 10c. for "Baby's Diary." 71 Hudson 
street, New York. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 




Wand 

GBSm 



rjSl CtJeoley no wand but P/casure's 

'** -* _ Ten, Hear*. *-=& 




Whoop! There's a new scow on at Fischer's Theatre, 
and to paraphrase Miss Vidot's song about her nether ap- 
pendages, half of it's idiotic and the other half is crazy. 
There isn't the vestige of a plot in it. and still less sense — 
but it's about the greatest three hours of absurd, howling, 
unadulterated fun ever seen in our fun-loving town. There 
isn't a slow moment in it. Everything goes with a whirling 
rush, and music, song, dances and witty dialogue follow and 
mix with each other in a bewildering manner. 

"Pousse Cafe" is the first installment, and is supposed to 
tell of some adventures in Paris. Miss M'aud Amber as 
Clorinda McCann is the principal character In it, and makes 
a hit by singing "The Rose of Killarney." with a boy tenor 
and a chorus of four in the gallery to assist her. The au- 
dience wears her out with encores. Of course Kolb, Dill 
and Bernard as the tall and short Dutchman and the Jew 
are present, and keep the audience hilarious with their 
comedy. Kolb and Dill constitute a syndicate who are to 
back Bernard in exhibiting a mechanical doll, and the squab- 
bling they do over the agreement furnishes unlimited amuse- 
ment. Mr. Bernard is a comedian of a high order, and the 
others are not far behind him. Charlotte Vidot does very 
clever work as the mechanical doll, her "I'm a Doll" song 
being an effective piece of work. Kolb and Dill and Misses 
Hope and Emerson introduce a song and dance that wins in- 
stant favor and has to be repeated many times. 

Mr. Winfield Blake's principal share of the entertainment 
consists in leading the chorus in "The Phrenologist Coon." 
an immensely good song, done by Mr. Blake with inimi- 
table unction. A round, smooth voice, a good stage presence 
and much ability as a comedian are characteristics that 
make him very popular. 

A burlesque on "Antony and Cleopatra" constitutes the 
second act. In this, two spectacular dances and some 
catchy songs are introduced, and hilarity unlimited. Miss 
Amber, gorgeous and magnificent in green, is Cleopntia, 
and Mr. Blake, solemnly funny, is Antony. Mr. Harry 
Hermsen, whom I neglected to mention as doing an excel- 
lent piece of character work in the first act, is Dinkidides, 
janitor of the Cleopatra flats. He does clever fooling. Kolb, 
Dill and Bernard appear again, this time as the three slaves 
accused of stealing mummies from the pyramids. They gain 
their freedom through a horse-race, which caps the climax 
for stage fun. 

The programme finishes with a travesty on "The Royal 
Family," which again introduces the principal people at 
Fischer's. It is screamingly farcical, and gives Mr. I 
nard, as the queen, an opportunity for the best work he docs. 
None of the others are far behind in adding to the merri- 
ment. 

Fischer's has taken high place in the heart of the amuse- 
ment loving public of San Francisco, and deserves its popu- 
larity. The present show is as good an evening's entertain- 
ment as could be wished — that is, if one is looking for di- 
version without instruction. Then, too, the bill is clean, 
nothing being introduced that could offend the most fastidi- 
ous. The costuming is gorgeous, and the chorus now works 
well. 

* • * 
Mistaken identity is the basis of most of the vaudeville 
sketches put on nowadays. There are two of them on at the 
Orpheum this week, and there have been a lot more recently. 
When these playlets first began in court public favor they 
were worthy of it. Full of bright humor, comedy that was 



not horseplay, and with definite plots, they were delightful 
to witness. But the one-act play has degenerated woefully. 
Plotless and witless, it is merely a hodge-podge of knocka- 
bout comedy and tenderloin humor. "A Desperate Pair," 
hy Frederick Hallen and Mollie Fuller, is an instance. They 
are taken for a bridal couple and are shown into a room re- 
served for the bride and groom. There they each find a 
notice of a reward for the arrest of two escaped criminals, 
male and female, the descriptions fitting the two principal 
characters. That's about all there is to it, except that it 
ends by mutual explanations. But it is not essentially dif- 
ferent from plenty of other sketches, and is no better or 
no worse. Mr. Hallen and M'iss Fuller do well enough in it — 
as well as anybody could be expected to do with such ma- 
terial. It pleases the audience, though, — so why should I 
care ? 

"Harry Linton and Leila Mclntyre are called "The Chatter- 
ing Chums." and do a little burlesque act — mistaken identity 
again — which pretends to be nothing else but an intro- 
duction to their songs, which are very pretty and well deliv- 
ered. Both have smooth, pleasing voices, and Miss Mclntyre 
has a pretty way with her. Less sketch and more Bongs 
would be a great improvement. 

The big thing in the bill this week is the act put on by 
the Russell Brothers, the famous Irish servant girl imper- 
sonators. They had not been here for five years, but their 
style has changed but little in that time. Instead of doing 
their turn by themselves, this time they are assisted by 
John Russell, Jr. and Annie C. Russell. Their sketch merely 
furnishes an excuse for a lot of dialogue between Maggie 
Mooney, impersonated by John Russell, and Rosie O'Grady, 
represented by James Russell — servant girls and rivals for 
the hand of Clarence McGuinnis. policeman. It is ratlin- 



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July S. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



rough comedy thai the Russolla present, but otremelj 
funny. They have an Inimitable brogue, and ara pert 

the mannerisms of th-- ■ lass ih R 

Jr. I» a sufflrlintly funny policeman, anil Miss Hiisscll ;is 
Bankroll helps out the fun. 
Mr. James Thornton Is a 9lnger and talker who pli 

i.Ks «.•!! and has a fund of good storii s. well told. 
Av.ry and Hart are very entertaining colored comedians. 

\V. .1. w. 



A Skin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever. 



"The Idol liuues for another week at the Tlvoll. 

"The Serenade" will follow. Rehearsals are going on for 
the grand opera season, which opens July 2Slh. Th. 
of seats begins two weeks in advance. July 14th. 

• * • 

"Pousse Cafe." "Antony and Cleopatra." anil "The Royal 
Family" will continue at Fischer's Theatre until further no- 
tice. 

• • • 

"Zaza" continues at the Alcazar until further notice, to 
be followed by "As You Like It." with Miss Roberts as Rosa- 
lind. 

• * • 

Valerie Bergere, a French comedienne, will make her first 
appearance in San Francisco at the Orpheum this coming 
week. Supported by a company she will present Grace Gris- ' 
wold's one-act playlette. "Billie's First Love." based upon 
the social life of the people whose world is bounded by the 
theatre environment. Mr. James J. Morton, monologist, 
will also be new here. The Rosseaus, sensational acrobats, 
will make their initial bow here. They make a specialty of 
novel somersaults. The Russell brothers and their sup- 
porting company will continue their sketch. "A Romance of 
New Jersey," and Mr. James Thornton will have new stories 
and songs. Linton & Mclntyre, the "Chattering Chums," 
Mr. and MYs. Waterous, the soprano and baritone, and Avery 
& Hart, colored comedians, and the biograph will be the hold- 
overs. 

• * * 

For the fifth week of the Miller-Anglin engagement, be- 
ginning Monday, the Columbia management will present a 
revival of Mr. Anthony Hope's romantic comedy, "The Ad- 
venture of the Lady Ursula." "The Wilderness," by Mr. 
Henry Esmond will be the pext production. 



The most beautiful restaurant in the United States is, 
of course, in New York. It is August Janssen's Hofbrau 
Haus, at 1214 Broadway, opposite Daly's Theatre. Mr. 
Janssen has copied the most famous places in Munich and 
Durnberg, and those who have seen the New York estab- 
lishment vouch for its artistic success. The interior is fin- 
ished in heavy oak and mahogany, and is characterized by 
that elaborate carving and medieval richness which is pecul- 
iar to the German architecture. We have at hand one of the 
menu cards of the Hofbrau Haus and find it notable not 
only for the good things it contains, but also for an artistic 
printing rare in this commercial age. 



Although it is not mentioned in the programmes the whole 
of the incidental music for "Francesca di Rimini," produced 
by Mr. Frederick Warde at the California this week, was 
composed and arranged by Dr. H. J. Stewart. The bridal 
chorus and march, the "Gloria in Exce'.sis," with organ ac- 
companiment, and the processional march in the third act, 
are exceptionally fine. 



Swain's Bakery, on Sutter street, is the headquarters 

for San Francisco's most exclusive people. For twenty-five 
years it has enjoyed this distinction, and all through the 
high standard it maintains. It is a favorite luncheon place 
for shoppers. 



D 



R. T. FELIX OOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAQICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removal Tun. Plmptot, Freckle*, 
Haifa patches, final) and Skin I)|«- 
I'li'i-i, ini*l every blemish OH ItcAiity. 

i detection. It bee itood iho 

test .if ;.,i yeara and la *<> bermlen ire 

to beeurett Is properly made. 

leoepl Krauteriell otetmllarnama, 

I>r. I.. A. Snyre fluid to a lutly of Die 

hant-ton(fl patient): "As you ladles 
will use them. I recommend 'Gour* 
aud'a < 'renin' as the leant harmful <>i 
nil Hit- ski n preparations." For sole 
by nil druggists (ind Fancy-goods 
Dealers in the United States, Canadas 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great .Tones street, N. Y, 




Columbia Theatre. OTTLOB * t*** w a '° MailBKen 

Beginning Next Monday. Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. 
Charles Frohman presents 



HENRY MILLER 



MARGARET ANGLIN 



and a special company in Anthony Hope's romantic comedy 

THE ADVENTURE OF THE LADY URSULA 

TTenry Miller as Sir George Sylvester. Margaret Anglin bh Lady 

Ursula. 

Next Plav— ''The Wilderness." 



Fischer's Theatre 



Did we not tell the truth? You must confess that we have again 
lived up to our promises. Our great triple bill eain the sensttion of 
the whole city. 

POUSSE GflFE 

ANTHONY AND CLEOPATRA, A ROYAL FAMILY. 

A veritable cyclone of irresistible fun. Kolh, Dill, Bernard, Blake, 
TJermsen, De Forrest. Amber. Vidot and our bewitching chorus. Re- 
member the 4th of July Matinee. 

T!i/^l! O «***.-» H «. .««. Mb8 * Ernestine Keeling, 
I VOl I Upera FlO USe. Proprietor and Manager 

Evenings at 8 sharp I Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp I 
Next Week, Last of the Favorite. 

THE IDOL'S EYE 

Come and hear "Fairy Tales," 

Monday, July 14th. Great Revival THE SERENADE. 

Popular prices— 25, 60, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 0. 



0„ L _ , . .„ San Franoiaoo's Greatest Music Hall. 
rPneU IM . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, July 6. 

VALERIE BERQEPE AND POM PANY; James J. Morton; The 
Rosseau*; James Thornton: Linton and Mclntyre; Mr. and Mrs. 
Waterou*; Averv and Hart: The B ograph and the RUfaSELL 
BROTHERS & COMPANY, 

Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday. 

Reserved seata, 25c: Balcony 10c: opera chairs and box seats. SOo. 



Al « -^ -, -, * TL«^i —«. Bhlabco & Thall, Managers. 
icazar i neaxre. phone Main 254 

Next (fifth and lasc but one) week. 
The Record Breaking Dramatic Success, 

ZAZA 
MISS FLORENCE ROBERTS 

In the title ro'e, supported by White Whittlesey and the Surpassing 
Alcazar Stock Company. Matinee Saturday only. Seals on sale two 
weeks in advance. 

Prices— Evenings. 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c & 75c. Matinees, 15c, 25c, 35c & 50c. 
Week beginning July 14th — "As You Like It." 



After the Theatre 



You won't find "Jesse Moore" Whisky in cheap places— it 

Isn't made for cheap men to drink. It Is the best and demanded 
by the best people. 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines beers and supper. 

The Cafe ZLnkand Is- society's gathering place after 
the theatre is over. 

SCIENTIFIC MANIPULATION 

Mrs. A. Bit.sbrougit, tlie succe B sful specialist, particularly in chronic 
and nervous disorders. Ladies snd children onlv. Home treatments by 
arrangement. Office Menesini Building. 231 Post Street. Room 12. Hours 
9 to 11 1 to 5.S0. Telephone James 260K. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 



&f>e Patriot 

By Adelaide Harcourt. 

"Gimme them firecrackers." 

"Lemme alone," with a whimper. 

"I'll knock ye off 'n here, in a jiffy, you— kid, i£ ye don't 
shell out." 

"A p'liceman '11 get ye. I'll tell 'im. I'll tell 'im," piped 
the other. 

He was a patriotic citizen of eight years, watching the 
Fourth of July parade from behind the silent, protecting 
draperies of the stone caryatids at the entrance of the Call 
building. How he got up there to that magnificent eleva- 
tion above the moving crowd was his own secret. How he 
was to get down again he did not know. But meanwhile 
he enjoyed the "procesh." 

"Hurray! Hurray! Hurray!" he yelled at the soldiers 
in the parade, tossing lighted fire-crackers in the air. They 
popped sharply and fell on a woman's bat. She jumped, 
and Jack's grimy face opened in a grin. He was arrayed 
for the occasion in a soiled green gingham shirt, and blue 
overalls which bagged — all around. His round, perspiring 
countenance was surmounted by a rimless straw hat. 

At home he had one treasure. It was an iron fly, which 
received pennies into a slit under its wings. When you 
wound it up this huge insect buzzed its legs and wings in 
a sort of rag-time jig. Put in the middle of a room it set 
a pair of little bare feet to keeping time. It was an absurd 
fly. A lady gave it to him and told him to hoard pennies 
in it, for the missionaries, who were across the sea teaching 
little Chinese children what Christmas meant. In three 
months he had managed to beg, borrow and steal exactly 
ten pennies. But he had forgotten about the little Chinese 
children. Only the week before he had gone to its secret 
den and extracted the grimy pence from the giant fly's 
iron stomach. He ran to the nearest store — before the big- 
ger boys caught him — and excitedly demanded firecrackers. 
He hid them in the inside pocket of his little overalls, slept 
with them under his straw pillow, ate with them in the 
crown of his ragged hat, — he passed wakeful nights — for 
fear the "bigger boys" of the over-populated neighborhood 
would find out he had them. He had no big brother to pro- 
tect him. He had only a toothless old grandmother. 

But now behind the calm caryatids, watching the proces- 
sion, with face tense from the strain of that fearful week 
of guarding the treasures, his patriotism overcame him. 
He drew the firecrackers out and "punked" a few. 

"Hurray! Hurray! Hurray!" he shrieked at the passing 
soldiers. 

Then the bigger boys pounced on him. 

"They'se all I got, kids," he pleaded manfully. "Oh, lem- 
me alone." 

But amid his shrieks of despair, they tore the firecrackers 
from his desperate grasp. The band boomed and flared, and 
to the passing music the magnificent soldiers walked past 
the caryatids. But they were blurred. He dug his dirty 
fists into his eyes, and knew the passionate grief of utter 
loneliness. 

A young reporter in the closely packed crowd looked up 
and caught sight of the grimy little figure, shaken by sobs. 

"Hullo, kid!" he called up genially. "What's the matter?" 

"I ain't got no Fourth of July," wailed the small citizen. 

The young reporter helped him down, and pressed some 
thing into his trembling hands. "Here, kid, is a fake bomb," 
he said, with the air of an accomplice; "set it off in a crowd 
and watch the fun. 

Then he disappeared into the humming building. Jack 
grinned, and the tears dried on his face. 

"Say, kid, what 'd he give ye?" urged a "bigger boy," ap- 
pearing around a column, with an unctuous smile. "Let's 
see!" 



"I'll tell 'lm, I'll tell 'im," warned Jack, swaggering a little. 

"As if we'd steal from you," said the bigger boy, in an 
injured tone. 

"Well, I d' know," suspicioned Jack. 

He struggled down the street, in and out through the 
thinning crowd, surrounded by half a dozen admiring friends, 
whose attentions were varied and almost cloying. 

"Say, kid, what ye goin' to do with it?" 

"You'll see!" he swaggered. He did not want to set it 
off. He wanted to take it home and put it in with the 
giant fly in the secret den. Through his excitement the 
passing music boomed again, and he yelled "Hurray!" 
shrilly in the crowd. 

A boy next him grabbed the bomb with one hand, while be 
cuffed its possessor with the other. Jack fought like a wild- 
cat, but what was the use? 

He found himself with a front tooth gone, blood stream- 
ing from one ear, and a swelled lip, standing in the street, 
with a policeman's hand shaking him until his spinal col- 
umn "jiggered." 

"What are you up to, you little demon?" asked the police- 
man. 

"I ain't done nothin'," answered Jack, sullenly. "Lemme 
alone, will ye?" 

"Ain't them boys jest Hell?" asked the policeman impar- 
tially of the crowd. Then he set Jack down hard on the 
pavement, and the citizen picked himself up sorely and 
limped off across the street, in and out among the cars 
and horses and people. He was going home to his old grand- 
mother, and he was going to set the fly to buzzing. He looked 
back and saw the stony smile of the caryatids. Somewhere 
in the distance the soldiers were still marching. 

"Hurray!" he said to himself through the blood on his 
lip. And he remembered that it was still the Fourth of 
July. 



Smartest Train of All. 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumed 
tri-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
es 1 ini' winter journey across the continent. 



The use of a stick on your husband may do him good. 

But carpets are different. A stick doesn't half clean them. 
The best and cheapest way is to send them to the Spaulding 
Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street. They renovate 
a carpet thoroughly without injuring the fabric. They call 
for and deliver goods. 




that dn/a'CKS 

!/7#//<Pis the most 
refreshing andsatisfylngdrinK 
on earth! 



July 5, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



13 



A Reply to Dewey's Traducer 



"Truth" says that "Iconoclast's" statements to the effect 
that Admiral Dewey Is a newspaper hero and that the 
Spanish fleet was composed of tubs and kettles, Is a 
barefaced lie- 



Editor News Letter. — Dear Sir: I have been a newspaper 
man myself, and I know that an editor is not responsible 
for the opinions expressed by a correspondent, but an 
editor has the right to exclude objectionable matter from 
his paper, and I hold that you. sir. should never have allowed 
such a mess of barefaced falsehoods to appear in your 
paper as those you printed last week under the heading of. 
"Why a Dewey Monument?" and signed "Iconoclast." 

To a thinking man like myself it is incomprehensible that 
any one should make such statements as Iconoclast does 
and expect them to be believed or taken seriously. Does he 
think that the public is as ignorant as he? 

His statement as to the Spanish fleet being composed of 
"half a dozen iron kettles, three or four semi-disabled wash- 
boilers, a brace of tubs and a beer keg" I will pass over as 
being either his distorted idea of humor or the maunderings 
of a diseased brain. But his assertion that the whole fleet 
would have sunk within twenty-four hours had not Dewey 
blown it up, cannot be passed over lightly. Our national 
pride is too deeply involved. Where does Iconoclast get his 
facts and figures for this statement? Why, sir, it is ridicu- 
lous! While the Spanish fleet was not the greatest in the 
world it was composed of some very good ships, entirely 
worthy of being engaged in battle by Admiral Dewey, ue 
showed remarkable courage in entering that torpedo-laid 
harbor — almost as much courage as Iconoclast does in ex- 
posing his crass ignorance. 

"After the battle of Manila Bay Admiral Dewey held the 
place in the public heart now occupied by ping-pong," says 
Iconoclast. I confess that I very nearly lose my temper 
over such foolish remarks. Iconoclast does not seem able 
to distinguish between an innocent love of sport and the 
patriotic regard in which such a noble man as Admiral 
Dewey is held. I have played ping-pong, and am very food 
of it; but not for a moment does it inspire me with the feel- 
ing engendered by thinking of the deeds of the noble heroes 
of this country. Such things as ping-pong are only transi- 
tory, while the fame and deeds of Admiral Dewey and others, 
whom Iconoclast holds as lightly as he does his amusements, 
will live forever. 

I am of English birth — but I have adopted the United 
States as my home, have become a citizen, and hold that 
I am a true patriot in every sense of the word; therefore, 
I fully approve of the erection of the monument to Admiral 
Dewey in Union Square. Iconoclast's suggestion that the 
monument should he changed to the Mayor Schmitz or the 
John P. Irish monument is enough to make a patriot's blood 
boil. Mr. John P. Irish, I believe, is a brilliant orator and 
a man of brains; still he is a pygmy beside Admiral Dewey. 
And while I will admit that Mayor Schmitz has shown him- 
self a worthy man in some respects, I do not hesitate to as- 
sert that between him and Admiral Dewey is a gulf so great 
as to make Iconoclast's suggestion not only ridiculous but 
almost criminal. This money was collected from the people, 
and it is their wish that Admiral Dewey should be so hon- 
ored. I do not know the sculptor, Mr. Robert Aitken, but 
a sense of justice enables me to see that it would be radi- 
cally wrong, after he has understood that he was working 
toward the glorification of our great Admiral, to force him 
into having his name connected with a tribute to Mayor 
Schmitz or Mr. John P. Irish — men whom he probably re- 
gards about as I do. 

I will acknowledge that Iconoclast is right when he says 
that dogs, children, theatres and saloons have been named 
after Admiral Dewey, but when he says that undertaking 



parlors and rat poisons have been named after him ho tells 
a glaring falsihood — a falsehood that makes his communi- 
cation unworthy the consideration I am bestowing upon It. 
I feel. Mr. Kdltor, that I have already taken up too much 
of your very valuable space; yet I Reel that such a man as 
Iconoclast deserves a public rebuke. His letter to you shows 
him a man utterly devoid of every Instinct and feeling that 
goes toward constituting a good American. Thanking you 
tor your consideration, believe me, sir, very obediently 
yours, TRUTH. 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



The very center of the city, convenient to alt the 
big stores and all places of amusement. Euro- 
pean plan, Jl a day and upwards. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square- Park.) 
Finest cafe In this city. 



Milton RotJlee. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 

A Hiffh Class Exolusive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate rates. 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 
AV. Johnson Quinn, Proprietor. 




RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C. 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 



of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. 
O. G. Staples, President ; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



EverydelicateBSen 

Domestlo and Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St,, above Kearny 



'I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim In.' 



-De. Shhadv, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 
L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 
Send for Pamphlet. 418 Sacramento St 



Worthington Ames 



Member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In stocks, bonds and municipal securities. 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street. Tel. Main 1381. 



Gray Bros. 



Hay ward Bid?.. California and Montcomery 

streets. San Francisco. 

206 New filch Street, Los Angeles 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 




The Comstock Market closes for 
The Pine-St. Market, the holidays on a very dull condi- 
tion o£ affairs. Prices are weak 
at quotations with light offerings of stock. On the whole, 
the market is no worse than it was this time three years 
ago. Conditions have remained the same since then, with 
an occasional flare-up which was not sustained for long. In 
the meantime the situation at the mines has been improved 
considerably, and things are now in shape to work them 
more economically and to better advantage by the introduc- 
tion of electric appliances, with abundant and cheaper motor 
power. The reports of superintendents for the week are 
satisfactory enough at the north-end of the lode where the 
usual amount of a high-grade ore is being extracted from 
Con.-Cal. -Virginia. The Ophir mine on the 1950 level is 
looking remarkably well, and on the same showing a few 
years ago the stock would have sold at much higher prii i s 
than it is worth to-day. A winze started near the boundary 
line of Con.- Cal.-Virginia was down six feet in high-grade 
ore at latest accounts, and in the stopes, raised to the sixth 
floor above this level, the vein in the top is in ore of first 
grade. During the past week sixty-two cars of ore were 
extracted, valued at $82.63, and three cars of $2fi.22 ore. 
Work on the Chollar ground on Brunswick lode is still 
stopped, pending the arrival of the 4-inch casing for the bore, 
which is daily expected. Some low grade quartz is still 
being met with in the southwest drift, 900 level of Caledonia. 
Overman is shipping ore to the Brunswick mill. In Justice 
ore is being extracted from the north drift 100 feet below 
the 600-level. The average grade of ore being sent to mill is 
valued at $23.00. During the past month silver has produced 

bullion valued at over $7,600. About 100 tons of ore wi 

shipped to the mill during the week. The market closed 
for the holidays from July 3d until next Monday at the 
usual hour. 

The market for oil stocks shows 
Oil Shares are Quiet, little change. Inside manipul- 
ation is alone represented, the 
public taking but little interest in the business for the 
time being. The latest report, dating from June 24ta to 
June 30th, gives a record of 19,620 shares sold, representing 
an aggregate value of $6,244. The prices in many instances 
are ridiculously low, and holders who bought in when the 
wave was at its height are out heavily upon their investment. 
So long as there are no assessments this is not so bad, and 
a reaction in the market will undoubtedly come in time, 
tt is different, however, when holders have to pay in more 
money every three months or so. It will take some time to 
even up their loss. The announcement just made that Pe- 
troleum Center will shut down after the present assessment 
comes in to lift a debt of $9,000 due by the company, must be 
cheering news to the shareholders. This concern has already 
raised a large amount of money by assessments, and should 
have something to show for it by this time. 

Many of the brokers on the local Stock 

The Local Stock and Bond Exchange are out of town on 

Market. a holiday, and will not take up their 

lines of business until after the echoes 

of the Fourth of July festivities have died out all over the 

land. This makes the market dull. The outlook, however. 

is good for active trading later in the season when trading 

is going full swing again. A number of new bond issues 

will be offered investors during the coming fall, most of 

them representing new power companies entering the field 



of competition with old-time lighting and power people. 
Before long, the name of these concerns will be legion. 
Every little inland town and hamlet will blaze with electric 
lights, and the fuel of the pioneer will be a dead issue in 
mining and other industrial branches. Where the gas makers 
will get off is a matter of self-confidence with themselves 
and their shareholders alone. Gas may still rank as a 
utility, but it is far from being a necessity of the future. 
By degrees, and most reluctantly upon the part of the 
manipulators, to whom secrecy seems to be second nature, 
the transfer of the control of the Sacramento Electric, Cas 
and Railway Oo, is being confirmed. Why there should be 
so much mystery about the transaction is something difficult 
to explain, unless it be ascribed to tne old '49 theory that 
mystery attaches an air of wisdom to the manipulators, 
ranking them above the ordinary herd of humanity. It Is 
difficult to weed out these old mannerisms of a bye-gone age, 
but if it pleases the ancients it injures no one. Prices ruled 
steady in the local industrials during the week, with high- 
class bonds in good demand, and firm. The Board adjourned 
over from June 30th until M'onday next. 

The latest strike of oil in the Western 
The Coming Oil Union Company's land in the Carreaga 
Territory. field has aroused much interest amon; 

the owners of land along the trend of 
the deposit, which hears northerly toward the town of !-os 
Alamos. Already the field is nearly two miles long and over 
half a mile in width, with every certainty that the same de- 
posit can be traced for a still further district of three 
n iles. At present the daily yield from only nine wells is 
over 2,000 barrels, which suggests the development in this 
vicinity, tne most valuable oil territory in the State. 

A subscriber who bought Hutchinson 
The Situation in Sugar somewhere about $20 per share 
Sugar Shares, wishes to know whether the stock is 
likely to work lower. After standing 
under his shares down to the present market rate, one 
would think that it is little difference where the decline 
ends, especially as the stock is not held on margin. There 
is (no reason why any of the Island sugar stocks listed on the 
local market should go any lower but that is not saying 
they will not do so. It is not safe to predict the action of 
any stock, let alone those on this market, where, with a 
few exceptions, no effort is made to protect shareholders 
against bear raids. Judging from recent reports from the 
Islands the situation at the plantations is sufficiently bright 
to warrant a firmer tone in the share market, and the only 
wonder is that prices are not already strengthening up. 
Probably after the holidays are over the market may harden 



HOW DO THEY DO IT 



Those new lightning: ^speed 



AUTOMOBILES 



that we hu'ld to order? The swift, easy motion i*. ettined 
by superiority in details of manufacture that it would pay 
you to investigate. We sell automobiles on 



MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS 



California Automobile Co., 

301 CALIFORNIA ST. 

Factory, 346 McAllister St. Phone South 146 



July 5. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 



■ h should I... nun h more 
ihnn i would ii"i !'•■ wl 

-:ii in maintain in> - 
•font nnlng u. move out ■•( 

Where Borrowing the S nk* of this city on 

Means Prosperity. According t 

Real Estate Circular, the hall 
nding June SO, 1902, shows a larger number of loans 
on tMs clai irlty than any other period in the his- 

lory of the city with one exception only. During this p 
mortgages and deeds ol tmsi were Bled amounting ;n 
J12.2G2.519. an Increase over the last half ol 1901, of 
"Nothing hotter indicates our growth," says 
this authority, "than this steady increase ol real estate in- 
debtedness." The exception referred to was the first half 
of isTT. when 2300 mortgages were filed represnting loans 
aggregating $12,666,900. The present demand for money is 
it la said, a healthy onp. and the hanks are now willing 
and anxious to have borrowers who will really do something 
with the money borrowed. 

Transactions on the Producers" Oil Exchange from June 
24th to June 30th. 



I o IUkM'.s. I",.. . i 
RlCK.RD, 1st. • 

Vl.-e-l'rp.l.lem ,1 



Kimiieily ..I 



i I, Mi Oosa, tod \ i.a 

I'rcul.U 
1 «rko A l«c>- ( ... | p „ K .r,-.VItBllil« lily 



SToeKa. 



SHARKS 

SOLD 
■ 1,0 

1,000 
5011 



Beat FIsk , 

California Standard 

'"entral Point Con 

Home 

Independence , 1 ,000 

Junction 6.600 

IJon 1.200 

Monarch of Arizona 10) 

Monte Cristo 100 

Peerless 10J 

O. W. Va 2.6U0 

Oil City Petroleum .1,500 

Reed Crude 1,000 

Sterling 700 

Twenty Eiirtat 100 



Union.. 



10 58 50 @ 
818,620 



Hanoi: of gross 

PRICES SAIHs 

6 @ ■• 00 

15 @ 150 

80 @ ■ 400 

3 30 @ I65 

6 @ 60 

20 @ 21 1.42i 

5 @ .. 6 

16 ® - I* 

1 25 @ 1 30 20 2 

7 50 @ 70n 

16 % 41a 

14 @ 15 51 5 

31 @ ■■ 31n 

1 42'A@ 1 47'A 1-tHU 

1 30 @ . . 13q 



575 

J6.244 



How to Make a Nuisance of Yourself 



Some safe street rules which, if followed, will make you 
cordially hated and may lead to your arrest. 

Do you carry a cane? If so, grasp it firmly; in the right 
hand, at about the middle. Now drop the hand holding the 
cane carelessly to your side. Wait till you are in the midst 
of a crowd, then begin swinging your cane hand vigorously 
back and forth. If you follow these directions closely you 
will be able to plant the ferule of your cane into the stom- 
ach of everybody within a radius of four feet. This works, 
for I see it tried several times every day. 

If you have a tendency toward embonpoint you may put it 
to good advantage by standing carelessly in the main en- 
trance of a much-frequented business building. Put your 
hands in your pockets, so that your elbows take up what 
space your body doesn't. When people come up behind you 
and say "Excuse me!" don't pay any attention to them, 
but let them squeeze by you. This will work with women, 
children and small men, but at the approach of football 
players and prize-fighters, it is best to step aside. 

If you don't know a tune get on the dummy of a Califor- 
nia street car and whistle it all the way from Kearny to 
Fillmore streets. 

Stop a Market-street car and tell the conductor that you 
don't want a ride, but you'd like to know what time it is. 

B. G. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a ree'ilar raeetinc of the Bond [ Dii'tCora ol this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate cf ihree an,i one-eighth \V/n%) 
per cent per annum, on all deposits tor the six months endine June 30, ,902, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and af er JuU 1, Hl'2. 

KOBERT J. TOBtN. Secretary. 
San Francisco. June 27. 1902. 
Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco, Cal- 



HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE 

21 AND 23 FREMONT STREET. 

nining Hachinery 



and 
Supplied 



Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Jamea Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of wo ks— Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting o! the Board of Directors, held 
on the 26th day of June, 1902, an asae^-ment (No (3) of five (5) cents per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pa.i able immediately 
in Ui ited Stales cold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the company, 
room 79. Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Franoisco, Califor- 
nia, 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 31st DAY OF JULY, 1902 
will be deemed delinquent and ad verlised for sale at public auotio" ; and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on Thursday, the 2Ut day 
of August, 1902. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Direcors, 

CHAS. E. ELLIOTT. Secretary. 

Olhce— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30. 1902, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, July 1st, 1902, 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 

Office— 33 Post Street, San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The board of directors declared a dividend for the term ending June 30th. 
1902, at the rate of three and one-eighth (3%) percent per annum on all de- 
posits, free of taxes, and payable on and after July 1. 1902. Dividends not 
callei for are added to ami bear the same rate of dividend as the principal 
from and after July 1. 19 J2. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Moi.lgomery Street, Corner of Suiter. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

For the six months endine June 33th, 1902, dividends have been declared 
on deimsitsin the savings departmentof this Company as follows: On term 
deposits at the rale of 3 6-10 per cent per annum, and on ordinary deposits 
at the rate of 3 pei cent per annum, free of taxes and payable on and after 
Tuesday. July 1, 1902. Dividends uncalled for are added to the piincipal 
after July 1, 1902. 

J. DALZELL BROWN Manager. 

Office— Corner California and Montgomery Streets, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Peerless Oil Company. 

Has declared a dividend of six cents per share, payable July 1st,, 1902 
Books close June 25th. Ti e addres«»of alockhol'tr W. I.Taze is desired. 
GURDON BRADLH.Y, Assistant Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Paraffine Paint Company. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Paraffine Paint Com- 
pany will be held at the office of the company, 116 Battery street, 
San Francisco, California, at 1.30 P. M., on Wednesday, the sixteenth day 
of July, 1902, to elect Directors to. serve for the emulng year and for 
the transaction of such other business as may be brought before the meet- 
ing. R. S. SHAINWALD, Secretary. 

San Francisco, June 24, 1902. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Continental Building and Loan Association. 

For the year ending June 3*\ 1902, has declared a dividend of 5 per cent on 
all ordinary deposits, 6 per ce t on term deposits and 8 per cent on install- 
ment slock. 

WM. CORBIN, Sec. and Gen'l, Mgr. 

Offioe— 3)1 CaUfo-nia Street. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending June 3), 1902- dividends on term deposit- at the 
rate of three and six-tenllin (3 6-10) ptr cent perannum, and on ordinary de- 
posits at the rate of three (t) per cent per annum, free of tixea. will be pay- 
able on and after July 1, 1902. 

FRED W- RAY. Secretary. 
Ofl'ice— 222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building, San Franolsco, Cal. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 



1902. 




s 



own \*rter 

'Hear the Crier? "Me t »<° deml art thou''. 
1 One that will play the devil, .sir. withyou ' 




Says lanky Bob to Jim, says he. 
"The fight is near at hand — 
The time is ripe, it seems to me 
To take a final stand." 

Says beefy Jim to lanky Bob: 

"We'll divy the receipts — 
we're both paid nicely tor the job, 

And so, who cares who beats? 

"We'll simply flop a coin," says he, 

"And thus decide the bout. 
It's heads tor you and tails tor me. — 

Now, who goes down and out?" 

Because the unruly brats being daily corailed by the police 
are "children of the poor," the Examiner imagines — or pre- 
tends that it imagines — that they should be allowed to ter- 
rorize the town and go unpunished. Of course the Examiner 
caters to the criminal parents of these criminal children, 
for of such is the Kingdom of Hearst. But the average, well- 
conducted citizen is in no wise loath to see some surveillance 
put over the street arabs who are under no discipline at 
home, and who spend their nights and days in mischief 
and rowdyism. Of course, if their parents were high enough 
in the scale of being to discipline such children, the police 
would not be called upon to interfere. As it is whole neigh- 
borhoods in the residence districts are made unsafe by the 
stone-throwing, jeering, insult bandying of gangs of these 
tender demons. To be robbed by a footpad at night is 
somewhat terrible, but to be spattered with mud in broad 
daylight militates far less to the dignity of the victim. 

I spoke above about the cruelty of arresting little boys 
who break windows and throw defunct cats at nice old lad- 
ies; and in the same connection I might say that a recent 
act of the Japanese Society of California is not so funny 
as the Examiner is trying to make out. The Japs have 
come together and decided upon a special committee to whis- 
tle tor the police when new arrivals from Japan are mo- 
lested by small boys. This is a necessary measure, as I 
know for myself. Only last week I saw two Japanese boys, 
evidently newly-arrived immigrants, knocked down by two 
score such innocent cherubs as the Examiner wants to pro- 
tect. Of course it's brutal to arrest the boys. A public 
spanker would be helpful. 

Has a man, woman or child a legal right to sue a "bucket 
shop" for failure to deliver goods? Ask me. Mrs. E. M. 
Lipka has brought the law on the heads of Moss & Co., of 
632 Market street, tor the recovery of $'l,000, which she 
claims went into the kitty and never came out again. A 
bucket shop, as far as my knowledge goes, deals almost ex- 
clusively in the sort of trick pail you see on the Orpheum 
stage. Their buckets have a false bottom and all the money 
you put therein disappears through the bucket in a most mys- 
terious manner. If I lost $1,000 in a bucket shop— which 
I will never do— I think that I would consider it worth the 
price to see the money disappear. 

We hear a lot about the oppression of labor, but the op- 
pression of capital is not mentioned when lathers are charg- 
ing $10 and $12 a day, as is the case in the present boom 
demand. 



It's awful about Pacific Grove. For years it has been a re- 
ligious town. Methodists, W. C. T. U., Christian Endeav- 
orers and Epworth Leaguers have consecrated it to their own 
use, have had a lot of Sunday closing laws in force, and have 
made it, from a medieval standpoint, a model town. But 
there are progressive people in Pacific Grove, queer as such 
a thing may seem. Some oi them have been elected mem- 
bers of the city council, and they are trying to lift the town 
out of its slough of silurianism. Of course the Methodists 
are howling lustily, and threaten to hold their conferences 
somewhere else. If I lived to Pacific Grove I would say, 
"Go, and good riddance. Hold your meetings somewhere 
else and let Pacific Grove shake off its moss-backism and 
be entitled to a place on the map." From all accounts there 
are people there who feel as I do about it, and they intend 
to raise a merry row in their un-Christian endeavors to make 
Pacific Grove a progressive, wide-awake town. If the re- 
ligious and temperance cranks are bound to have a dead 
town for their meetings, let them establish one out in a des- 
ert, where nobody cares. 

The American army and the officers of the same are ex- 
cusable on the grounds that they have not been in business 
long enough to understand international laws and interna- 
tional customs. Not long ago I had cause to take a whack 
at the stripes of a half dozen lieutenants stationed at the 
Presidio, who were sporting "swagger sticks" in blissful 
ignorance of the fact that the short bamboo so named is 
only carried by privates and corporals in the British Army. 
And now an American Colonel, aided by a Lieutenant, has 
again made us stand pigeon-toed in the eyes of the world 
by sending a detail of armed men up the streets of Naga- 
saki. If this act had been taken seriously it would have 
been considered as an act of war between the United States 
and Japan. As it was, the Lieutenant and his detail had 
their arms taken away from them and were sent back to 
their ship, while the natives laughed. It is too bad that 
Japan, so recently civilized, should have to give a lesson of 
courtesy to the officers of our Christian land. 

William McAllister, ex-soldier, has surrendered himself 
to the police of San Jose under peculiar circumstances. He 
was in the Philippines, instilling civilization, liberty, and 
benevolent assimilation into the natives. He became blood- 
thirsty, and determined that he must kill a Filipino — not 
in battle, where he couldn't be sure he had done the deed, 
but out in the open, where he could hear the death rattle 
and see his victim's last frenzied gasps. So he sneaked away 
from camp, met three friendly natives, and shot one of them 
dead. It has been preying on his conscience ever since, 
and he has given himself up. No wonder McAllister re- 
mained a mere private. He had a conscience, a horror of 
murder, so he never became an officer. With what scorn 
the shoulder-strapped instigators of the water-cure and other 
tortures will look upon this Private McAllister, who had 
a conscience and couldn't commit a cold-blooded murder 
without being sorry tor it afterwards. 

Well, the easy people of San Francisco have been taken 
in by another fake prize-fight — that between Gans and Mc- 
Fadden. They paid their money to see Gans batter the 
helpless McFadden around the ring for eight minutes — and 
I am heartily glad of it. If we can have one or two more 
bogus contests before the Jeffries-Fitzsimmons fiasco takes 
place the public may awaken to the true nature of that 
fight. Even the dailies are not so enthusiastic over it. 
Jeff and Fitz are making a pretense of training, but they 
are putting in more of their time calculating how much 
they can make from the "sport" loving public. They will 
make a comfortable fortune from it, and the public will be 
poorer by many thousands of dollars — but my observation 
teaches me that they will not be one whit richer in wisdom 
then than now. 



July 5. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 




There is no family in San Francisco more generous to 
servants and employees than the Floods. Three or 
four years ago Miss Jennie Flood gave her coachman au.i 
his wife flats worth fifteen or twenty thousand dollars, and 
all the Flood servants are well provided for. A new story 
of Flood generosity comes to my hearing. One of the wait- 
ers at the Poodle Dog. a Frenchman named Robert, became 
ambitious and wished to buy an interest in the restaurant. 
He had served Mr. Flood for many years, and he confided 
his ambition to hJm. The next thing he knew Mr. Flood 
had made him a present of what he desired, and now Robert 
is one of the proprietors of the Poodle Dog. 

* • • 

Mr. Homer Davenport gives Mr. Nast, the great cartoon- 
ist, the credit for being named the successor of the man who 
for years was the head of the caricaturists of the United 
States. It was during war time, and the mother of Mr. 
Homer Davenport, who lived on a farm in Oregon, admired 
Mr. Nast's work so much that she prayed and hoped the 
child she was about to give birth to would be a great cari- 
caturist. There was no artistic ability in the family, and 
so she tried pre-natal influence by pasting all of M'r. Nast's 
cartoons in a scrap book and looking at them every day. 
The boy she gave birth to was Homer Davenport. 

* * • 

One of the most amusing of the Shriner incidents oc- 
curred during this week, days after all were supposed to 
be miles away from San Francisco. One straggler was left 
behind, and he promenaded Market street at three o'clock 
in the afternoon wearing an evening suit, a Turkish fez on 
his head. He was wondering how much time he had lost. 

* * * 

Brigadier-General Andrew Burke, U. S. A., retired, is 
known in San Francisco and throughout the United States 
as the athletic General. His hobby is baseball, and he al- 
ways had the best nine in his regiment. Only once were 
they ever beaten, and that was by the Seventh Infantry, 
while they were encamped at Chicamauga before the Span- 
ish war. General Burke always saw: every baseball game 
and at Manila he was ordered to receive the surrender of 
General Mescardo and his troops. His reply was: "I cannot. 
I must see the game." He was dissuaded from his desire, 
however, and he consented to forego seeing a base ball 
game for the first time in his life. 

* * * 

It is about a year since a lot of members of Congress, who 
had constituted themselves into a sort of River and Harbor 
Commission, came out to take a look around California, and 
satisfy themselves as to this State's needs in the way of 
money for improvements. A story of their visit to Stock- 
ton has just leaked out. 

The Stockton people were anxious to make an impression 
on these Congressmen, so they rather spread themselves 
to entertain them. They appointed a lot of bright and pretty 
girl members of the entertainment committee and then 
took the visitors for a ride on the San Joaquin. Of course it 
was by accident that the Captain went into a shallow part 
of the river and ran the boat aground. Then the visitors 
were told that this was a regular thing, and that if anything 
in the world was needed it was money to dredge the San 
Joaquin. 

Congressman Johnston of Minnesota was fortunate enough 
to have as a companion on this voyage one of the prettiest 
girls In Stockton, and while the struggle was going on to 



remove the boat from the mud she said in her most wistful 
way: 

Now. Mr. Johnston, you Bee how badly we need help. I 
know winn you go back to Washington you will vote for 
money for us." 

"Yes." said Mr. Johnston, "I will sec that this old slough 
is filled in and a trolley line built." 

* * • 

The beautiful Kentucky palace that Mr. J. B. riaggin 
has been erecting has another motive than that of having 
merely a delightful country home. Mr. Haggin will in the 
future be a citizen of Kentucky, for the reason that the laws 
of that State entitle the wife to half of everything the hus- 
band possesses regardless of how many children there are, 
and Mr. Haggin is anxious that his beautiful young wife 
inherit without dispute half of his estate. This looking 
into the future is quite typical of Mr. Haggin, but it does 
not signify that he intends to die soon, for he does not. 
A man just returned from New York relates that Mr. Haggin 
within the past year has put into operation some gigantic 
commercial schemes. His friend said to him: "Why, MY. 
Haggin, will it not take a great many years for them to ma- 
ture?" And the financier answered without hesitation: 
. "Oh, not so very long. I expect to finish the business 
in about twenty-five years." 

Mr. Haggin is now in his eighties. 
* * * 

The story of Sandow's infatuation for an attractive and 
athletic San Francisco girl is not credited by his London 
acquaintances. At last accounts the Sandows were very 




Ever Thus 



The even and unvarying 1 uniformity 
in the quality, aere, purity, flavor oi 



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wi.l be steadily maintained and 
years hence, it will be as now, 



Always Best by Every Test. 



CHRISTY & WISE COMMISSION CO.. Inc. 
223-225 California St., San Francisco, Cal, 
Telephone Main 873. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 



happy. The strong man has a beautiful wife, who was a 
.Miss Brooks "i" Manchester. Her father is a leading photog 
rapher of that city, which may explain those stunning photos 
of Mrs. Sandow tliat found their way to this city shortly 
after Sandow's marriage. The "perfect physical model" is 
the father of a lovely little boy. The Sandows live in great 
style, not socially, but from a luxury point of view, near 
St. James Park. Eugene has a school in London and one m 
Manchester. His cast as the "Modern Hercules" appeared 
for a short time in the National M'useum. It was thought 
by the directors to be too much of an ad. for Sandow, 
therefore it was removed. 



the South American. One day an English noblewoman and 
her daughter were expected to call, so Sybil got the man in 
thi case into another pari of the bouse. The Countess came 

>rding to schedule, and everything went lovely till the 

mutual friend bustled into the room. 

Terry and I have been in the dining room hanging pic- 
she said innocently. 

The Countess heard and understood the situation. Her 
call was short and somewhat frostbitten. 

"I wish Terry would hurry up and many me," said the 
prima donna after the Countess bad left. "Living this way 
makes me feel too naughty for anything." 



It is reported by officers who came over on the transport 
Warren with Major Waller of court-martial fame, thai the 

latter was a little Sultan of Sulu while in command. One 
night, it is said, while recovering from the mental strain 
suffered during his trial he complained that the noise of the 
soldiers passing the door disturbed him. He stood it as 
long as he could, then issued a manifesto ordering every 
man Jack and John aboard to take off his shoes and go about 
barefooted. 

His order was obeyed with but one exception. A civilian 
named Linderbland refused to imbibe the cholera germs 
through the pores of his naked feet by tramping about the 
sloppy decks, and for his disobedience he was ordered to the 
"brig." 

Whether it was from the influence of the fresh sea air 
or the discontinuance of his prescriptions it is hard to say. 
but in a few days the Major sufficiently recovered to real- 
ize the folly of his order, and it was immediately revoked. 

Linderbland, in the brig, refused to accept the apologies 
of the "king" for the outrage. 

"Major Waller," said he. "I have danced to your music 
here, but as soon as we get ashore, you may dance to mine." 

From present indications the music is playing and the 
cotillion has begun for Major Waller. 

• • • 

Mr. Barney Bernard, the realistic Jewish impersonator, 
who comes from Webber & Field's, and has been a drawing 
card at Fischer's Theatre many weeks, is himself a Hebrew, 
his family being among the oldest established Jews in New 
York. The hospitality of the Bernards is proverbial. It 
is told of Mr. Nat C. Goodwin that he called at the Bernard 
house in New York, but did not find Harney in. Mrs. Ber- 
nard, the mother, however, entertained the actor and when 
he arose to go she detained him, saying: 

"Don't go, Mr. Goodwin, slay to lunch. I haff some fine 
Cham crowder keeping varm for you on der stove." 

• • • 

Mr. Roos, the clothier, recently served on a jury in Judge 
Lawlor's court, when the Judge decided not to dismiss the 
jury until they agreed. This meant that they would be locked 
up for a portion of the night. All the jurors were displeased, 
but Mr. Roos had an expression of positive dismay as he 
heard the decree. Finally he approached the Judge anx- 
iously, and said: 

"Couldn't you possibly let me off to-night? It is a matter of 
great importance." 

Judge Lawlor, who is a kind-hearted man, sympathized, 
and said: "Well, what is it?" expecting to hear of a death 
in the family. 

"We have a ping-pong tournament at our house to-night." 
was the answer. 

• * • 

Sybil Sanderson declares that she will never visil thi 
Coast again, so I suppose we have a right to tell everything 
we please about her. Before the shapely Sybil attached the 
name Terry to her own, and while Senor Terry was waiting 
for his fortune, she lived with him in a Parisian apartment 
house, and nobody seemed to eare very much. During 
her "engagement" a confidential friend also stayed in the 
same house, sharing the knowledge of Sybil's intimacy with 



Judge Hunt lias joined the Kaglos. This Information has 
startled bench and bar, anil the rumor went around that 
indge is to retire from office and start a corner grocery. 
However, the more probable explanation is that the Judge- 
is running for office this fall. 

* • * 
There must be money in the business of purser, when a 
man dependent solely upon salary can afford to keep up 
appearances as a member of a swell club. At the most, a 
purser can reckon on about $150 a month, the salary paid 
in first-class passenger lines. More- frequently, however, 
the pay will range from $75 to $100 per month. This dm s 
not go very far in club life if a man has any friends there 
and keeps his end up. especially if cards are played. The 
only other way possible to swell the salary account outside 
a private income would be from "tips." but this is generally 
supposed to be a perquisite of flunkeydom on shipboard, a 

tice unknown outside the steward's department. Pur- 
sers are generally ranked as officers removed from menial 

Ice, so passengers would not likely dare to offer them 
a tip in exchange for every little court -. i ttende i during a 
passage. No one would have imagined that this grade of 
officer in the merchant marine flew so high until a morning 
paper within the week discussed at length the facilities 




VARINEY W. OASKILL, Special Agent 



With HILBERT BROS., Importers 

TELEPHONE BUSH 25 SAN FRANCISCO 



July 5. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



aOordtMl Mr. T I ,na. as a mi 

of the Pacific -Union Club, for entertaining 
riving on his Bteamer. It i for them, ■ 

80 When tl. ~i|j|l ,if (h. P I 

• different entirely from the data In the 
Where ■•very Tom. Dick and Harry can pi put on" If at 
all presentable. But here, where lines are drawn so. rigidly, 
how nice it must be to bo friendly with a purser of such 

hiKh soi ial aspirations. 

■ • a 

This happens to be an absolutely true story, A fevi months 
ago there were gathered In the San Francisco salon of a 
woman physician a palmist who has made rattier a 9U 
at her calling, a Chicago physician who is a noted Mystic, 
his star patient, a rich woman of his own city, and a young 
widow of this town who ran tell fortunes by the cardB, 
though not for any other consideration than pleasure. The 
widow told the Mystic's fortune by the bits of pasteboard, 
and the palmist read his palm. In the midst of chat about 
other matters a silence fell upon the company. The palmist 
turned pale, the Mystic gasped for breath, and finally had 
to open the window to recover his equilibrium. Alter the 
Uystlc and his patient bad gone, the widow said to her hos- 
tess: "Do you know, that man has committed a crime in his 
past, and he will do it again. I read it in his cards." The 
palmist added: "You noticed that moment of silence? Well, 
at that moment I saw that man with his fingers choking his 
throat, just as he will be choking that woman some clay. I. 
tell you that within six months that woman will die. ami 
that doctor will be her murderer." 

A fortnight ago the woman who had been the Mystic's 
patient died in Chicago. She was alone when she died, 
and the cause of her sudden demise is shrouded in mystery. 
She had been under the care of another physician for a 
week or so before her death. The local palmist thinks 
that Anna Katherine Green or Conan Doyle might like to 
look into the story, for it certainly holds good material. 
The Chicago papers headlined the woman's decease, for she 
was not an insignificant personage. Her income was five 
hundred dollars a day. 

* * * 

Edward P. Critcher, one of the organizers and officers 
of the new California Society in New York, once edited 
and published a little amateur paper called the Seal Rock. 
I have a copy before me of the tiny sheet, the issue of April, 
1881. It contains the first chapter of a continued story by 
Mr. Thomas H. Kerr, entitled "Tom Bently, or The Taming 
of a Bad Boy." One of the news items refers to a benefit 
to be given "Master J. Mersfelder" by "his numerous friends" 
in Saratoga Hall. Master M'ersfelder, it will be remembered, 
afterward went to Paris to pursue his art studies, and has 
met with great success in the art world. His name is well 
known in New York, where he ranks among the best of 
San Francisco artists. "Eddie" Critcher was also connected 
with another paper in his school-days. This Was the Pub- 
lic School Record, published in the interests of the school 
children, and which had only a short life. 



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H. REHNSTROM 

^(Successor to Sanders A: Johnson.) 

TAILOR 

Tel- taaln 5387 San Francisco, Gal. 



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FORBES BROS., AGENTS, 307 SANSOME STREET 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 




A BALLADE OF PROTEST. 

(To the Address of Master Rudyard Kipling Poetaster.) 

(Henry Louis Mencken, in the Bookman.) 

For long, unjoyed, we've heard you sing 

Of politics and army bills, 
Of money-lust and cricketing, 

Of clothes and fear and other ills; 

Meanwhile the palm-trees and the hills 
Have lacked a bard to voice their lay; 

Poet, ere time your lyre-string stills, 
Sing us again of Mandalay! 

Unsung the East lies glimmering. 

Unsung the palm-trees toss their frills, 
Unsung the seas their splendors fling. 

The while you prate of laws and tills. 

Each man his destiny fulfills: 
Can it be yours to loose and stray; 

In sophist garb to waste your quills? — 
Sing us again of Mandalay! 

Sing us again in rhymes that ring, 

In Master-Voice that lives and thrills; 
Sing us again of wind and wing, 

Of temple bells and jungle trills: 

And if your Pegasus ever wills 
To lead you down some other way, 

Go bind him in his olden thills- 
Sing us again of Mandalay! 

Master, regard the plaint we bring, 
And hearken to the prayer we pray; 

Lay down your law and sermoning — 
Sing us again of Mandalay! 



THE MORNING SUMMONS. 
(Riohard Burton in the Atlantic Monthly ) 
When the mist is on the river, and the haze is on the hills, 
And the promise of the springtime all the ample heaven 
fills; 
When the shy things in the wood-haunts, and the hardy on 
the plains. 
Catch up heart and feel a leaping life through winter- 
sluggish veins: 

Then the summons of the morning like a bugle moves the 
blood, 
Then the soul of man grows larger like a flower from the 
bud; 
For the hope of high Endeavor is a cordial half divine, 
And the oanner cry of Onward! calls the laggards into line. 

There is glamour of the moonlight when the stars rain 
peace below, 
But the stir and smell of morning is a better thing to 
know; 
While the night is hushed and hoklen and transpierced by 
dreamy song, 
Lo, the dawn brings dew and fire and the rapture of the 
strong! 



FORTITUDE. 
I Lorenzo Sosso in the Overland Monthly.) 
Let me not cavil that my lot is cast 

Where fortune mocks the burden of my lays; 

Since mine the heritage of golden days 
And treasures of the immemorial past. 
Mine too the view of ocean spacious, vast; 

The sunset on the hills that guard its bays; 

Tne stars that travel on in secret ways; 
And those pale dawns that follow all too fast. 
Ratner my spirit laughs to leap at fate, 

With heart made wise through love, through hope 
made strong. 
For like a trumpet through the Golden Gate 

I hear the wild winds of the western sea 
Blowing weird fanfares from the realms of Song, 

Where mighty bards sit throned in majesty! 



BANKING. 
London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

424 CALIFORNIA STREET. 
HEAD OFFICE— 65 Old Broad street, London. 

Capital Authorized. 12,600,000. Capital Paid Up, $1,400,000. 

Directors — Henry Gosahen. Chairman, London; Christian de Gulgne, 
San Francisco; Charles Hemery, London: John L. Howard, San Fran- 
cisco; Bendlx Koppel, London; Greville Hoieley Palmer, London; Norman 
D. Hideout, San Francisco; Arthur Scrivener. London. 

Agents In New York, Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. 

BRANCHES: Portland. Oregon ; Tacoma, Wash., Seattle. Wash. 

Letters ot oredlt Issued available for travelers and the purehase ol mer- 
chandise In any olty of the world. Deal In foreign and domestlo exoha nge 
Accounts of country banks reoelved. Terms on application. 

A. L. Black, Cashier W. Mackintosh. Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With whloh is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFIOE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. 88.000,000- Reserve Fund. $2,000,000. 

Aggregate Resouroes over $70,000,000- 

Hon. Geo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker. General Manager. 

J. H.Pluimner, Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St-.B- C, S. Cameron Alexander, Manager 

NEW YORK. OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. Alex. Laird and Wm. Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon District 
Dawson. White Horse; British Columbia: Atlln, Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Sandon. 
Vancouver, Victoria In the United States— New York, N. Y. San Fran- 
clsoo, Cal- Seattle, Wash. Portland, Ore- Skagway. Alaska- 
Bankers In London — The Bank of Scotland; Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers In New York — The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents In Chicago— The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans- 
— The Commercial National Bank. 
San Francisco Office: Walter Powell. Manager. A. Kalna, Asst. Manager 

LonJon, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansomb and Stjtteb Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 Pald-Up Capital. $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund. $1,000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 10 Threadneedle street. London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres A Cte, 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

8IG. GREENEBATTM, Manager. 
R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Franolsco 
Jas. E. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Oowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL $600,000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. $147,000. 

DIRECTORS-- James K. Wilson, Win. J Dutton.Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope, H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce. C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York— Hanover National Bank. Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank. Boston—National Shawmut Bank ; Philadel- 
phia— Drexel & Co.: Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louie — The 
Meohanlcs' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown. 
Rrown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes St Co. Denver— Natlouat 
Bank of Commerce- Johannesburg — Robinson South African Bank'g Co. 
Ltd. 

Germania 1 rust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve. $450,000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of Individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 
Legal Depository for money In Probate Court proceedings. Interest 

PAID ON TRUST DEPOSITS AND SAVINGS. INVESTMENTS carefully Selected 

for our oltents. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg. President: W. A. Frederick. vice-President; H. 
Brunner, Cashier; J. O. Rued, Trust Officer. 

Board of Auditors— A. G. Wleland.Geo- W. Bauer and J- C. Rued. 

Board of Director* — F. Kronenberg, Fred A. Kuhle. Fred Woerner, W. A. 
Frederick, F. C. Siebe. John Rapp, Walter M. Wlllett and Herman L. E. 
Meyer, E. A. Denicke. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansomb Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. O. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up $1,600,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. St W. Seltgman Sc Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEINHART. P. N. LJJJENTHAL. Managers. 

Securty Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St Mills Building 



NTBBE8T PAID ON DEPOSITS. 



William Alvord 
William Baboook 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 
DLREOTORS. 

8. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
L, F. Monteagle 



H. ii, Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutohen 
R. H. Pease 



July 5. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



15he Boy God Made 



By A. B. Stone. 

Mark Twain has received a "directorate ol letters" from 
the State University of Missouri. At the rate the various 
institutions of learning make or find excuses for linking 
prominent names with their own it is a question of only 
a short while before it will be a distinguished honor to bo 
neither a graduate nor an "adopted citizen." 

Mark Twain h.ing again before the public with a new book, 
one hears many good stories about him that would perhaps 
otherwise rest in obscurity until his death. An ex-Yir- 
glnla City resident told me this: 

Very many years ago, Mr. Clemens was one of the 
school committee appointed by old Bill Nye for a certain 
district. As the district included mostly little Piutes with 
one or two white children, a woman teacher was selected 
for the job. Her specialty was morals, and she had ».er 
own system of instruction. She used to range the young- 
sters in a row, and each had his particular place to stand. 
So every child soon came to know its especial question, and 
no other. "Who made you?" was No. l's question, and No. 
2 got "Who was the strongest man?" The third boy, who 
was half Piute and half white, was as stupid as you could 
find them in tLe district. One day Mr. Clemens came to 
the school to examine its mental standing. The teacher 
brought out her three stellar pupils, and told Sam to go 
ahead and ask them their catechism. The first boy, mean- 
while, had asked leave to go out and recover from a sud- 
den attack of faintness. Now, the humorist of course did 
not understand the teacher's system of instruction and 
therefore began with the first question. 

"Sonny, who made you?" he asked. 

"Samson, sir," answered the boy. 

"Oh, no," cautioned Mr. Clemens, turning to the next 
boy. "Come, now, tell me who made you, my son." 

"Job," was the reply, and the teacher blushed with morti- 
fication. 

"Oh, I guess you didn't quite understand me," said the 
questioner, kindly. To the other boy: "Are you sure, my 
boy, that Samson made you?" 

'Yes, sir," said the little fellow, with the assurance of 
one who knows he is right, "for he was a very strong man." 

Mr. Clemens looked at the other boy, No. 3 on the list 
oi stars. 

"Are you certain that Job made you?" he questioned. 
"Now, stop and think a moment." 

"Oh, yes," and the little half-and-half absolutely beamed 
with pride, "because job was a very patient man." 

"Why, you little rascals," said Mr. Clemens, fancying that 
the boys were having a jest with him, "don't you know that 
God made you?" 

"No, sir," cried the Piute, with an alarmed face; "the boy 
God made is out in the ten-acre lot kicking up his heels and 
having a bully time. You let him go because he was feel- 
ing sick." 



You cannot be sure of getting the kind of whiskey 

you call for unless you ask for J. F. Cutter. The barkeeper 
knows that he cannot deceive you on that — that it has a 
peculiarly rich flavor and aroma that once tasted will never 
be forgotten. J. F. Cutter is the essence of purity and per- 
fection. E. M'artin & Co., 54 First street, sole agents for 
the United States. 



■ If you wish your new suit to always look new, send 

it regularly to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 
Stockton street, where it will be cleaned, freshened and 
pressed. They also clean gloves, cravats, laces, curtains, 
and all such articles. Their work cannot be excelled, and 
promptness is always their rule. 



BANKING. 

Wells, Fargo 6t Co. Bank 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Capita). Surplus, and Undivided \ to «&■ 2QO 2* 
Profits. July 31. 1901. J *"»*" **™-«°* 

DUDLBT Evaks. Acting President; Homer s. Kino. Manager* II. Wadi- 
worth (.'Mliler; F.L. Lipman, Asbt. Cashier; II. L. Miller, Asat. Cashier. 

Branches— New York;Salt Lake, Utah; Portland, Or- 

Correspondents throughout the World. General Banking business tran- 
sacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 



Deposits Jan. 1, 1902... f30.026.452 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 

E. B. PO ND. P resident 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 



Reserve Fund 1130,908 

Contingent Fund 480,204 

W. O. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau have moved to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreets, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Maeree. W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 

0. Miller, Robert Watt, George O. Board in an. Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In cheoks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenings, tor receipt of de- 
posits only 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, S2.000.000. 

Surplus, 81,000,000. 

Undivided Profits, April 1. 1902, 82,956,345.78. 

WTXULAM ALVORD President | THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vlce-Pres't I. F. MOULTON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CLAY Seoretary I SAM H.DANIELS Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co. : the Bank of New York, N, B. A. 
Baltimore — The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louie — Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London — Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris — Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin — 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaf t. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit Issued, available In all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CAUFORNTA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,316,381.43 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1.000,000 00 

Deposits December 31. 1901 30.766,038.17 

BOARD OF DDEIECTORS— President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
John Lloyd; Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 

H. Horstmann, Ign. Strfnhart, H. B. Russ, Emll Route. N. Ohlandt, and 

1. N- Walter. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt: Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Seo- 
retary. George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attor- 
ney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Up Capital 8800,000 

James D. Phblan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Story. Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DTJREOTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald, Charles Holbrook : 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo &, Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. ■ 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subsoribed Oapltal..8l2,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... 8250,000 
Paid-in-Capital 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Pubposb ie to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Offiok— 3. W. Cor. California and Battery Streets, San Francisco 

Wm. Corbin. General Manager 

Crocker- Wool Worth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Oornbk Market. Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81,000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Gbo. W. Kxinb. Cashier 

O. E. Green, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant C&ahlei 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E, B Pond, George Crocker, O. E. Green. G.W. 
Henry Kline T. Scott <•». W. Scott 



22 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 5, 1902. 

The Coal Girls of Nagasaki 



In Your Room. 



Wash delicate things— handKerchiefs, laces, 
doilies, etc. (thing's which one cannot send 
to the ordinary wash) in Pearline's way 
viz : Soak, rinse, squeeze — directions on 
each packet. Spread smoothly while wet, 
on a mirror or window pane. This is bet- 
ter—safer—than ironing. Grand advice for 
bachelors, maidens, boarders and hotel 
guests. Saves fabrics too delicate and valu- 
able to risK to others' hands. 

Pearline is Trustworthy, 



College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic. Full college 
course of studies. Modern building; steam heated. 
Unsurpassed beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 



College San Rafael, San Rafael. CaL 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, and Illustrating 
Life classes. $3.00 month. 

927 riARKET STREET, 



DR. H. d STEWART 



Teacher of Vocal Music, Piano, Or^an Harmony 
and Composition. 

Special course for si niters desiring church 
positions. 

STUDIO: II05 BUSH STREET 



PAPER 



BLAKE, MOFFITT 
&TOWNE De r,', 

TELEPHONE MAIN 199 

55-57-59-61 Firtt Street, San Francisco. 

Blake, Moftiu & Tuwne, Los Anpele--. Cal. 
Blake, McFall & Co.. Portland, Or. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS, ^SaMof&t 1 

"GRAND PRIX" PARIS, 1900. THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 

AWARD. Thene pens are " Ibe beat In Hie world," 

Sole aeent for the United Stages. 

Me. Henry Hoe, 91 John Street New York. 

Sold by all stationers. 

CRAIG BROS.: 120 Sutter Street, San Francisco. 

IMPORTERS OF 

Scotch Tweeds 

AND FINE WOOLENS 

Suits $30 and up, Telephone Davis, 910 



By Max Stovey. 

What would our American girl say — the little girl who 
doesn't like to practice even one small hour at a time on the 
piano, or the school girl who thinks studying her lessons is 
very, very hard work, or the older girl who complains about 
the work in the office or in the store, or the wife wno is 
always fault-finding about so much housework to do, and — 
yes — even the grandmother (for there is no delicate distinc- 
tion of age here — they are all girls) — what would she say 
if she had to exchange places with the little brown Japan- 
ese coal girls — seketan musume — of Nagasaki? This is 
how she would spend her days, her years — her life: 

If she lived in Kogakura, or Fukada, or Shikimi, or any 
of the other little villas that skirt Nagasaki — and most of 
the girls come from these places — she would take her 
place at daybreak in the "sail pan" and row to Nagasaki, 
there to become an important factor in one of Japan's most 
interesting enterprises — the coaling of the ocean liners. 
"But what have girls to do with the coaling of steamboats?" 
you may well ask. In China and Japan, you know, the great 
question of women encroaching upon man's laboring field 
has no consideration. There the women have the privilege 
of doing the same and as much work as the men, and in 
most cases they have still greater freedom — they may do 
all the work. Therefore, the many disruptions consequent 
to the higher education of women elsewhere are totally 
unknown, but even in those countries, where what we call 
advanced ideas of civilization, hobble along so feebly, coal 
heaving seems a strange occupation for women. Stranger 
still is their novel method of doing the work. 

The girl who goes to bed with her face and hands bathed 
in cold cream and lotions would never dream of anything 
so frightful. This is the way the work is done: Instead of 
the big iron buckets and donkey engines we see along the 
docks, little mat baskets, the size of an ordinary saucepan 
and holding about seventeen pounds, are used; the women 
(and the men, for there is no stronger or gentler sex) and 
the children are themselves the parts of the living engine 
that does the work. From Takishima, Shimnoseki, Taka- 
saka and other districts, the coal comes. Lighters carry it 
alongside the steamer; platforms are swtung around the coal 
chutes and the working line, or "human step ladder," as the 
sailors call it, is soon formed. Up from the lighter to the 
platform the line ascends — men and women standing shoul- 
der to shoulder upon baskets, coal heaps, barrels, boxes, 
planks or any footing that will give a foot or so elevation 
toward the chute. Two snovelsful of coal go into the baskets, 
a pair of brown hands pick them up, and they move upward 
along the line to the chute with the swiftness and regularity 
of machinery. Sometimes five or six lines on either side of 
the steamer extend out over two or three lighters, and there 
are hundreds of baskets moving along the line at the same 
time. It makes a striking and animated picture. Like so 
many bees or ants, the Japs look, their little brown beads 
bobbing up and down, and their bodies swaying from side 
to side — a wonderful example of skill and endurance, 

The positions at either end of the line are the more diffi 
cult, The girl at the lower end stands facing the line. 
She sweings her body to and fro and takes at each turn the 
filled baskets as they are handed to her. She must keep 
the swing of the line by sending the baskets along at regu- 
lar intervals in rapid succession. The girl at the upper end 
empties the coal into the chute, and with the same movement 
of her hands and body thai throws away the empty basket. 
she catches the new "lie. The little Jap kids, who in S;in 
Francisco would be our very young paper and messengei 
boys, catch the emptj baskets as they tall to the platform, 
unci toss them back into the lighter to be refilled; there 
is no break — no stop. As evi rj events basketful goes Into 



July 5. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



ihr- chute, the girl at tne top of each line cries out In nor shy 
ilainty voice. Ill icak of a little toy .loll 

Then coma* the mo' if a man 

tl.e heaxl of the lim-. I ba .lock, Iii 

me Court, sit the tai; 

from (heir line, with great care an. I precision, they 
make a mark on a epi twenty marks count one 

When the lighten are nil empty, these sheets are cot- 

I, and by a comparison wiiii the dimensions ol the 

bunkers, the amount of coal on hoard is easily determined* 

"How primitive." you will say. and what a waste of la- 

bnt when you think thai, in on.- single day a big 
liner can be loaded with enough coal to carry her from Naga- 
saki to San Francisco, it do. iad, ami especially 
when girls do most of the work. Sixteen hundred tons is 
an ordinary day's work for a fair-sized gang, so you can 
imagine how fast and hard these girls work. Try lifting 
a fifteen pound weight over your head for an hour or so, 
and then think of these poor girls through the shivering cold 
of winter and the sweltering heat of summer working all 
day at it — and for what? Iwenty cents .Japanese money, 
which is the same as ten cents in our money, is all the most 
of them get. When noontime comes the ones that have not 
brought their little ball of rice with them must sit and watch 
others more fortunate eat theirs. It's a strange life they 
have learned. 

Poor innocent creatures, how ignorant they must be, you 
imagine, but yet their faces have much of philosophy in 
them. "It isn't so terrible even for girls," they seem to say, 
"we have been brought up to this work all our lives, and, 
besides, there are few offices for us to work in, even if we 
could write shorthand and use a typewriter; the men have 
all the clerkships; there are no factories and of course, you 
know, we must do something." Some of the girls have really 
intelligent and comely features, but the married ones still 
adhere to an old Indian-like custom of staining the teeth 
black. Dressed in the silks and finery of the matinee girl, 
our little musume would cut a stunning figure on the 
Market-street promenade. And courage — these girls have 
plenty of it. Here is an incident that will show how faintly 
the line between the gentler and the braver sex is drawn; 
Crowded together in the hold of one of the lighters were 
thirty or forty Japs, mostly girls, some filling and some pass- 
ing the baskets. Suddenly one of the girls dropped her 
basket, and uttered a little cry. Everybody stopped and 
looked. A huge, writhing snake darted from the basket into 
the crowd. There was no chance to retreat. One of the 
girls, quicker than the rest, jumped forward, grabbed the 
snake by the tail and tossed it high in the air over the side 
of the lighter. No one had fainted. No smelling salts were 
needed, and in less than a minute all were back at work as 
if nothing had happened. Think what a terrifying effect 
a harmless little mouse would have amongst our girls. 
What changes a higher standard of civilization has in store 
for them, remains to he seen. 

When night comes and the lighters are all empty the 
girls jump into their "san-pans" and row away, singing, 
joking, laughing. They seem to be very, very happy — and 
yet ? 



Windy summer days are here, and you will need 

something to protect your complexion from its effects. 
Nothing equals Camelline for this purpose. Used and in- 
dorsed by Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, and Adelina Patti. 



Dentist. 80 
extracting. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 

Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 



Nothing but the best and freshest of fruit and vege- 
tables in the stock of Omey & Goetting, stalls 33-34-45-46 
California Market. Try them. 



ALASKA 

Refrigerator 

Is the best con- 
structed ever put 
on this market. 
The Alaska will 
keep provisions 
longer and use less 
ice than any other 
refrigerator. Send 
for catalogue. 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO., 

Importers. 




REDUCED 



Genuine 

Wellington 

Coal 



FOR SALE BY ALL RELIABLE DEALERS 

$10.00 per ton 





BEFORE leaving the 




city for your summer 




vacation you had bet- 


A 


ter store your value j 




ables in the Vaults of ' 


Wise 


the 


Precaution 


CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 




AND TRUST COMPANY 




Cor, CaliiornlavfcMontiromery st. 




San Francisco 



"When you ask for "Jesse Moore" Whisky be sure you get it. 

Don't let anyone tell you they have something just as good. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN T f ^'Ve^riat Melcfcfn ?im- 



edy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs 
at 323 Market St., San Francisco. Send for circular. 



Depot 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 




£f§g. 




Highland Springs 



ALWAYS OPEN 

The famous health and pleasure resort of L,ake County. Fin- 
est waters for the cure of Liver, Kidney, Malaria, Rheuma- 
tism and Stomach Troubles. Every comfort and amusement. 
Free swimming tank. Croquet, Tennis. Regulation bowling 
alley. Riding and driving horses. Splendid Trips to moun- 
tains or valley. 

NOTE SPECIAL RATES: 

One person in room, "small hotel,' $10.00 per week. 

Two persons In room, "small hotel," $18.00 per week. 

One person in room, "cottages," $11.00 per week. 

Two persons in room, "cottages," $20.00 per week. 

One person in room, "Main Hotel," $12 and $14 per week. 

Two persons in room. "Main Hotel," $20.00 and $22.00 per week 

Special inducements for school teachers or families desiring 
to remain by the month. 

For descriptive circulars and analysis of the waters call on 
The Tourist Information Bureau, 10 Montgomery street, or 
the Traveler Office, 20 Montgomery street, or write direct to 
Craig & Warner, Managers, Highland Springs, Lake County, 
California. 

Anderson Springs 

Only natural Mineral Steam 
Baths in Lake County 

14 distinct mineral springs of 8 different characters, hot and 
cold, Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. Board: $10 to $14 per 
week. Baths free. Address J. ANDERSON, Anderson 
Springs, Middletown, Lake County, California. 

Fare— San Francisco to Sprints and return reduced to S8. Send for circu- 
lar. Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5% Kearny St.. San FranciBco. 







HOTEL 
MATEO 

SAN '1ATIO 
CAL. 

WtjENN & SP/fULDING 
Prop'rs- 


A HIGH-CLASS SUMMER 
AND WINTER RESORT 


Reservations may now be 
made for August, Septem- 
ber, October, and the win- 
ter season. 



Hotel El Monte 



LOS GATOS 



Under new management- Five minutes from depot. Now 
open for business. Table unsurpassed. 



RATES 



«o $15 Per Week. 



THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the finest Static Galvanic sinusoidal and 
Faradlc Electrical apparatus. A corps of well-trained nurses of 
both sexes skilled in all forms of treatments and manipulations. 

Rest cure scientifically carried out A quiet, home-like place 

beautiful scenery. Mt. Hamilton and the famous Lick Observa- 
tory in plain view; one block from electric cars; fifteen minutes" 
walk from the center of the city. Terms: $10 to $20 per week, 
Including medical attention and regular treatment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



The Geysers 



One of the wonders of 
the world 



New Management. Newly furnished. Rooms hard finished. 
First Class Table. MeMs a la Carte. Dairy and Vegetable 
rtarden. New Ba'h Houses. Eleotrlo Light. Swimming 
Pool. Twenty miles of the best fishing streams. Hunting 



RATE9-I10. ' 12 14 . 



FABITJS FERATJD, Lessee and Manager 



BEAUTIFUL 



Laurel Dell 



THE ORIGINAL SWIT2ER- 
LAND OF AMERICA. 



Largest dining-room in county; new myrtle cottage; 
hunting, boating, bathing, marine toboggan, new livery, 
coquet, tennis, bowling, Tally Ho coach free to guests 
daily to our mineral springs; 15 different kinds of 
water. 
Accommodations for three hundred people. 

E. DURNAN, 
Laurel Dell, Lake Co., Cal. 



Blue 



New launches anu 



BOATING, BATHING. FISHING AND HUNTING. 
boats. Tennis court and all other amusements. 

HED1CAL SPRINGS 

Our famous "White SULPnCB " Springs, Hot and Cold Baths, and etc. 
«end for new pamphlet. O.WEISMAN, Midluke P. O,. Lake Co, Cal. 

or call at office of C. N. W. W. R. R. Co., 650 Market Street. 



Lakes 



Hotel Ben venue and cottages 



LAKEPORT, CAL. 
LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking the 
shore on Clear Lake. New pavilion, boat-house, and bowling alley. 
Open nil the year. Special facilities for accommodating families 
with children ; home cooking ; boating, bathing, hunting, and super- 
ior fishing. Lovely drives and walks. New sanitary plumbing. 
Modern improvements. Re-furnished, re-decorated. Rates; $8, 
$10, $12 per week. Special rates to families. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



Skaggs 



HOT SPRINGS, Sonoma County; only 4% 
hours from 8. F., and but 9 miles staging; 
waters noted for medicinal virtues; best 
natural hot mineral water both in State; 
boating and swimming in Warm Spring 
Creek; good trout streams; telephone, telegraph, daily mnil. express, and 
8. F. morning and evening papers. First-class Hotel and Stage Service. 
Both morning and afternoon stages; round trip from S. F. only $5. to. Take 
Tiburon Ferry at 7:30 a. m. or 3.3 1 p. m. Sundays, 8 a. m. only. Rates, fl a 
day or $12 a week. References: Any guest of the past seven years. Pa- 
tronage of 1901 unprecedented. J. F, MULGREW, Skaggs, Cal. 



ROSS VALLEY 



TO LEASE 

Property known as Tamnlpais Villa; suitable for hotel purposes; ren 
moderate: Kent Btalion; 44 minutes from city. Apply to G. E. Bctleb, 

413 California Street. 

WISDOM CONSISTS in doing the right thing at the right 

time. 
WE ARE ALL WISE— afterwards— when It is too late. 
THE TIME to take care of your health is when you have It. 
NEVER ALLOW yourself to get into a rut or a groove, 

either physically or mentally. 
bREAK the monotony that makes so many men and women 

old long before their time. 
TAKE an occasional trip. 

THE COUNTRY along the California Northwestern Railway 
is not the only place to visit, but it certainly is the best. 
ITS LOCATION between the coast and the interior affords 

that salubrious climate which invites living In the 

open air, and fills up the system with renewed energy. 
CALL or write for 

" VACATION, 1902," 

A little book issued by the California Northwestern Rail- 
way Company, (The Picturesque Route of California) giv- 
ing Camping Locations, Hotels, Mineral Spring Resorts, 
and a long list of Country Homes where board for the Sum- 
mer can be secured at from $6.00 to $8.00 per week. 

Ticket Offices. G, r >0 Market St.. (Chronicle Buildlne) and Tiburon Ferry, fool 

of Market St. General Office . Mutual Life Hull. line, Sansorae 

and California 9t». San Frauolsco. 

H. C.'WHITINQQon'l. Manager K. X. RYAN.Oen'l. Pa,,, ant. 



July 5, 1902. 



SAN FRANCI8CO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



OBITUARY. 

James Hunter, who fur thirty JUUt had ben known i" 
liquor men as one of the best gangers In the . it > . lied this 
week of apoplexy. He had an offlre In Snn Kra- 

In Alameda. Three sons ami thr laughters survive 

him. 

Thomas Cutler, a nntivr of Putnam. Conn., died Jim. 80lb 
at his home. 630 Fifteenth street, Oakland. Deceased was 
a retired men-ham. seventy seven years of age. ami leaves 
a widow and five grown children. He was a prominent Mason 
and was buried with Masonic honors. 

Mrs. E. B. Hartson, widow of the late Chancellor Hart- 
son, died last week in Napa, aged seventy years. She was 
a native of New York. She came to California and to Napa 
In 1854. when she married Mr. Hartson. Mr. Hartson was 
Judge of the Superior Court in Napa County, a member of 
the Assembly and of the Senate. He was at one time Col- 
lector of the Port of San Francisco. Mrs. Hartson was 
respected and loved by all. 



The following are among tiie arrivals at Highland Springs: 
Mr. Preston Morris. Mr. C. E. Dodar and wife, Mr. A. 
Marlinweiler and wife, Mrs. W. H. Wood. M'iss May Wood, 
Mr. Melvin Wood, Mr. J. J. Loggie, Mr. W. A. Mitchell, Mr. 
C. L. Wooll. Mr. D. Brandley Plymirs. M. D., Miss M'. Brown, 
Mrs. Bernstein and child, Hattie Levin, Blanche Levin, Mr. 
A. Johnson, Mr. Bert Stinson, Mr. A. C. B. Weil, Mr. L. A. 
Wagner, Dr. H. A. Frederick, Dr. M. W. Fredrick, Mr. W. 
E. Graves and wife. Mrs. C. Ivancovich, M'iss P. Ivancovich, 
Miss K. Ivancovich, Mr. J. Ivancovich, Mr. B. Ivancovich, 
Mr. G. Ivancovich, Mr. E. Ivancovich, Mr. C. H. Robinson 
and wife, Mrs. McVay, Mr. D. A. Cahill, Mrs. M\ Cahill, 
Miss K. Cahill, Mr. E. E. Schmitz. 



The following are among those now at Blue Lakes: Mr. 
W. A. Sabin, Mrs. Phil Lippitt, Miss Florence Lippitt, Miss 
May Lippitt, Mr. W. W. Forse, M'r. Bernard T. Shaw, Mr. 
Palmer Hewlett, Mr. Allen Spurr, Mr. Edwin C. Calef, Miss 
Anna T. Haley, Miss Alice R. Power, Mr. G. M. Grigsby, 
Mrs. E. Feldheim, Miss L. Feldheim, M'r. Charles E. Corey, 
M'r. W. C. Hazelton, Mr. and Mrs. H. Lindner, Mrs. Emil 
Happersberger, Miss Anita Happersberger. 



—Take no other, have no other, use no other whisky than 
"Jesse Moore." It's better than any other, and you can have It 
for the asking, but get It. 



AMERICAN DISPENSARY, 614, Pine street, above Kearny. 

To Camera Folks 



The OCTOBER ISSUE of the OVERLAND MONTHLY 
will be a CAMERA NUMBER. It will contain a number 
of articles on the photographic art, and also reproductions 
of many of the finest prints obtainable. We want PACIFIC 
COAST PRINTS of out-door scenes on album or artists' 
paper, and for the best print received suitable for reproduc- 
tion in half-tone we will pay $15; for the next best $10; and 
for the next best $5. We will also reproduce the ten next 
best which are entitled to honorable mention by the judges. 
In judging prints the adaptability o£ the scene for magazine 
publication will be considered. 

Prints not used will be returned when accompanied by a 
stamped and addressed envelope. 

A special prize of $5 will be paid for the best photograph 
by a boy or girl under 16 years of age. 

All Prints Must be Mounted. 
Any Size Will be Considered. 

Address, 

CAMERA EDITOR OVERLAND MONTHLY, 

320 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



LAWN PLAN W—rV 

.IT K. ' - i 



NCAREST TMC CITY 



5ummer Resorts 




Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 

Santa Cruz Mountains 

Delightfully located 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 



BATHING, FISHING, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 
Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 



BOWLING=== 

For the summer the Hotel Vendome management announces 
many new attractions at that popular resort. Two niacin fie ent 
swimming: pools are near the hotel, and guests may have all the 
pleasures of seaside resorts. 

===swinniNQ 

Bowline:, golf, tennis and pine ponff are among: the many diver- 
sions. Johannsen's Orchestra will be there all the time. Auto- 
mobile coaching from the hotel throughout the valley. 

GEORGE P. SNELL, Manager. 

At Hotel Vendome, 



SAN JOSE. 



Congress Springs. 



A charming resort In the Santa Cruz Mountains: 2 hours from San 
Francisco; delightful climate: swimming and all sports: table 
unsurpassed: best mineral water on the coast; open all the year, 
E. H. GOODMAN, Manager. 



BAY STATE HOUSE AND COTTAGES 

Santa Oetjz— Sunny rooms, good table, best service: reason- 
able rates. MRS. L. MATHISON, Proprietress. 

BEN LOMOND P ark House and Cottages; an ideal re- 
sort, unsurpassed climate, drives, fish- 
ing and hunting, two hours' ride to Big Basin. Moderate prices. 
MRS. I. N. HAYES, Proprietor. 



Agua Caiiente Springs 



Also Known as 
, - California Hot Sprints 

Quaintly situated, surrounded by mountains and woodland, and consist- 
ing of three di Iter e nt hot springs. Beached directly by trains of the Calt- 
tomia Northwestern Railway or those of the Southern Pacific Santa Rosa 
Line, (no staging) New Hotel, equipped with modern Improvements, ac- 
commodating 200 guests, Swimming Bath, private Bath. Ball Boom, Music, 
Livery, fane Drives Tennis Court; Rates 82 and $2.50 a Day ; $12 and 814 a 
week. Special terms for Families. Send lor illustrated booklet. Theodore 
Richards, Agua Caiiente, Sonoma County. Cal, The Half-Pare Sunday Ex- 
cursions on the California Northwestern Railway enab e visitors to spend a 
day at the Springs, returning to the City on the same evening. 



Byron 

Hot 

Springs 

Contra Costa Co. 
CAL. 



A SANITARIUM AND RESORT 

The new hotel is the finest on the Coast. Elegantly 
furnished rooms and suites with private mineral 
baths- All modern improvements for comfort and 
safety. Excellent cuisine and an air of home com- 
fort. Rheumatism and Malaria yield quickly to 
these wonderful waters and baths. 

Address Manager Lewis, Byron Hot Springs, Cal, 
Call on Lombard & Co., 36 Geary Street, S. P. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 




,*y ^.y-j-^.- 



Insurance 




The Home Fire Insurance Company of New York will not 
as yet annex the business of Great Britain. Underwriters 
generally concede that its determination to stay at home 
is wise. .American companies have not yet established a 
record of phenomenal success on the other side of the 
pond. 

* * • 

New Orleans is the residence of a .bad-smelling wild-cat 
under the name of the Aetna Insurance Company. It is try- 
ing to green-goods the market with its policies. It is need- 
less to say that any person simple enough to buy this brand 
of insurance would need to disinfect the safe wherein he 

stoweu his policy. 

• * • 

The Equitable Life Insurance Company subscribed for 
five million dollars of the new British consols. 

* * * 

A mortgage has been placed on record in the city of New 
York showing that the Washington Life Insurance Company 
loaned half a million dollars on the property at Broadway 

and Seventh street. 

• • • 

The State Mutual Life of Illinois is safe in the arms of 
a — receiver. 

• * * 

The Armour packing house fire, which cost the companies 
in the neighborhood of $300,000, has created no small 
amount of comment. The risk was not in favor amongst 
fire insurance companies. The fire spread rapidly, and it 
is surmised that the vestibule fire doors were left open by 
the watchman. The value of a roof parapet wall was shown 
by its having checked the fire. Wire-glass windows are also 
credited with having proved their utility in checking the 
progress of a fire. Before this occurred there was great 
opposition to the advance of 25 per cent in rates in the 
stock yards district, but this one fire will take the whole 
year's premiums to pay claims. 

* • * 

Denver and the Rocky Mountain field is in the throes of 
terrible suffering The joint committee of the Pacific Board 
of Underwriters and the Western Union, at their recent meet- 
ing, agreed that an advance of rates in that field was not 
necessary, the present schedules and rates being deemed by 
the committee to meet requirements. The question of board 
or non-board and affiliations was earnestly discussed, and 
hereafter affiliating and non-board companies' agents will 
be required to give pledges or bonds or both to abide by 
rules, dates and forms. This is rather peculiar, and is tue 
cause of the suffering, but is the dictum of the committee. 
A non-board company which will abide by rates, rules and 
forms is, per se, a board company, and it is in the wisdom 
of the committee deemed sufficient that the board companies' 
agents are bound by their companies, and per contra, the 
non-board agents must bind the companies for themselves. 

There is considerable speculation as to what action the 
insurgent non-board companies and their agents will take. 

* • * 

The automobile hazard is now occupying the attention of 
San Francisco underwriters. Rates on premises in which 
is stored gasoline-propelled vehicles must be advanced, and 
the companies may be expected to put a practically prohibi- 
tory tariff on buildings where this hazard affects the rate. 

• • a 

Dallas, Texas, burned up $350,000 worth in one little blaze 
the end of last month, and still the Texans object to the 
advance in rates. 



Mr. George L. Chase, President of the Hartford Fire, has 
had the degree of L. L. D. conferred upon him by the Ameri- 
• can University of East Tennessee. The university is prob- 
ably the best judge as to the special merits of the new 
doctor, which convinced it that he was a worthy subject 
for the gown. 

• • • 

Mr. George D. M'arkham, who is the President of the Na- 
tional Association of Local Fire Insurance Agents, has been 
elected a director of the World's Fair to be held in St. 
Louis. If this person Markham were compelled to pay at 
discount rates for all the newspaper advertising which he 
has managed to work, he would make a Rockefeller fortune 
look like a cancelled postage stamp in a gale of wind. 

• • * 

The railroad companies are supposedly compelled to fur- 
nish to the Inter-State Commerce Commission a monthly 
report of all casualties which happen to passengers or em- 
ployees. The Railroad Gazette has summarized for the year 
1901 the reports made by the different companies to ue 
Commission. While this may be interesting to the rail- 
roads, it is of valuable data to accident and casualty insur- 
ance companies. Here are the figures: Total number of 
casualties to persons on account of railway accidents dur- 
ing year ending June 30, 1900, 58,185; aggregate number o£ 
persons killed in consequence of railway accidents, 7,865; 
number injured, 50,320. Of railway employees, 2,550 were 
killed and 39,643 were injured; trainmen, 1,396 killed, 17,571 
injured; switchmen, flagmen and watchmen, 272 killed, 3,060 
injured; other employees, 8S2 killed, 19,012 injured. The cas- 
ualties to employees resulting from coupling and un- 
coupling cars, killed 282, injured 5,229, as against, killed 
260, and injured, 6,765 in 1889. Casualties from coupling 
and uncoupling cars: Trainmen, 188 killed, 3,803 injured; 
switchmen, flagmen and watchmen, 77 killed, 1,264 injured; 
other employees, 17 killed, 162 injured. Casualties from col- 
lisions and derailments: Trainmen, 380 killed, 1,867 injured; 
switchmen, flagmen and watchmen, 11 killed, 141 injured; 
other employees, 70 killed, 445 injured. 

The number of passengers killed during the year was 249, 
injured 4,128. The corresponding figures for the previous 
year were 239 killed and 3,442 injured. In consequence of 
collisions and derailments, 88 passengers were killed and 
1,743 injured. The total number of persons, other than 
empolyees and passengers, killed was 5,066; injured, 6,549. 
These figures include casualties to persons classed as tres- 
passers, of whom 4,346 were killed and 4,680 were injured. 
The total number of persons killed at railway crossings was 
750, injured 1,350, distributed as follows: Employes, 20 
killed, 53 injured; passengers, 1 killed, 3 injured; other per- 
sons, trespassing, 171 killed, 204 injured; not trespassing, 
558 killed, 1,090 injured. The number of persons killed at 
stations was 521, injured 3,836. This statement covers: 
Employees, killed 113, injured 2,570; passengers, killed 34, 
injured 646; other persons, trespassing, killed 338, injured 
393; not trespassing, killed 36, injured 227. 

The summaries giving the ratio of casualties show that 1 
out of every 399 employees was killed and 1 out of every 26 
employees was injured. With reference to trainmen — in- 
cluding in this term enginemen, firemen, conductors, and 
other trainmen — 1 was killed for every 137 employed, and 
1 was injured for every 11 employed. One passenger was 
killed for every 2,316,648 carried, and one injured for every 
139,740 carried. Ratios based upon the number of miles 
traveled, however, show that 64,413,684 passenger-miles 
were accomplished for each passenger killed, and 3,885,418 
passenger miles accomplished for each passenger injured. 
The corresponding figures in these latter ratios for the year 
ending June 30, 1899. were 61,051,^80 passenger-miles for 
each passenger killed, and 4,239,200 passenger miles for each 
passenger injured. 

One summary shows that in the course of thirteen years 



July 5. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



willing Juno .1". 1900. in consequence of railway acolden.-. 
ns were killed and 4S9.027 persons Wart Injured. 
The Injuries reported varied from comparatively trivial In- 
juries to those of a fatal character. The casualties for 
thirteen years occurred to persons as follows: Employer* 
killed 28.340. Injured I61.789; passengers killed 3,485. In- 
jured 37.729; other persons (Including trespassers) kllN-.l 
Injured 69.509. 



INSURANCE. 



Fountain Pens. 
Wo are selling agents for the Waterman Ideal and the 
Swan Fountain Pens, and sole agents for the Marshall, the 
best $1 pen In the world. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market 
street 



For ail purposes for which whisky Is used "Jesse Moore" 

will serve better than any other. Its purity is unquestioned, its 
quality without a weer. 



Unexcelled for liberality and security 

Life, Endowment, Accident and 
Health Policies 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 



of California. 



Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building 

San Francisco 



=IRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 



PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (limited) OF LONDON ENGLAND 

C- F. MULLIN8, Manager.' 416-41* California street, S. F. 

FLEE INSURANCE 

Northern Assurance Company. 

OF LONDON .^^HHIaX AND ABERDEEN 



Cash Assets 

$20,000,000 

221 Saneome Street, 




Geo. F, Grant 

Manager 

San Francisco. 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(Incorporated by the State of New York.) 

Assets, over {74,000,000. Liabilities, 164,000,000 

Surplus, over 19,000,000. 

Issues policies for all approved forms of insurance; adapted to 
all stations and circumstances of life. Policies are free from re- 
strictions as to travel and residence; are clear, concise business 
contracts, and conditions are plain and simple and easily under- 
stood. 

Pacific Coast head office: Hayward Building, corner Califor- 
nia and Montgomery streets, San Francisco. Home Office— New 
York City. 

John R. Hegeman, President; Haley Fiske, Vice-President; 
Geo. H. Gaston, Second Vice-President; Geo. B. Woodward, 
Third Vice-President; James S. Roberts, Secretary; Thornton R. 
Richardson, Assistant Secretary; A. S. Knight, Medical Direc- 
tor; Thomas H. Willard, Medical Director; Eugene M. Holden, 
Assistant Medical Director. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schlesslnger, City Agent. 304 Montgomery St, 8. F. 




LONDON ASSURANCE. 
OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,750 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,375 

A -acta 19,185,145 



Capital Riihm'iltuMl $5,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assela 2,602.050 



Pounded A. D. 1792 



Insurance Company 



Cc 



of North A 



merica 



Or PHILADELPHIA. PKKN. 

Paid-up Capital 13,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 35,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D., 1720. 

Capital Paid Up, {3,446,100. Assets, 324,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy Hldrs, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $184,000,000 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

501 Montgomery Street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager 
HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F- KINGSTON, Looal Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF New Zealand 
Capital, 15,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Cash Capital 31,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4,318,611.00 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,008.423.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Dept. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St., S. F. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital 367,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, Germany. 

Capital, 32,250,000. Assets, 310,984,248. 

Voss, Conrad & Co., General Manager. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-203 Sansome St., S. F. 

The Continental Fire Ins. Co. 

OF NEW YORK 

ARTHUR Q. NASON & CO., Metropolitan ilanagers 

436 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 
Telephone Bush 381, 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 




■■*&&-■•> . 



ociety 



^-t 




By Betsy Bird. 

As I predicted on one or two occasions the engagement of 
Miss Edith Huntington and Mr. John D. Spreckels, Jr., has 
been announced. She and little Pearl Landers were chums, 
and it is rather an odd coincidence tnat both are petite, 
made their debuts at the same time, and their engagements 
to sons of millionaires were announced within a few weeks 
of each other. They were both ill last winter from over 
popularity. They seem to be almost like Siamese twins, for 
what one does, the other does. Withal they are both unas- 
suming and unaffected, and everyone wishes them joy. 
It is rather odd to see tne grandson of Mr. Claus Spreckels 
and the grandniece of the late Collis P. Huntington, the 
two greatest financiers of the coast, engaged. Mr. John 
D. Spreckels, Jr., has not at all the heavy Spreckels beauty 
of his sisters, but rather the delicate beauty of his mother. 
If he were a girl he would be decidedly pretty. He will be 
tne first of all the Spreckels grandchildren to marry. 

Last summer, when the date of the Oelrichs-Martin wed- 
ding was fixed, the Hermann Oelrichs offered the use of 
their big house at Newport for the wedding breakfast, but 
it was proudly refused by the Charles Oelrichs, whose cot- 
tage is literally a cottage at Newport, resembling the Ala- 
meda cottages at thirty per more than the M'arble House of 
that city by the sea. Now I see that the Charles Oelrichs 
are building an addition to their house in Newport to ac- 
commodate the guests at the ceremony. 

The summer vacations and holidays have broken up that 
team of ping-pongists known as "The Champions," consist- 
ing of Miss Ardella Mills, Miss Ethel Cooper, Miss Eleanor 
Davenport, and Miss Margaret Salisbury. They played to- 
gether a great deal before the summer pleasures began. 
Margaret Salisbury is the best player of them all, but she 
was beaten by Mr. Sumner Hardy. However, she defeated 
him later, and so it is a toss-up. Mrs. Leonard Cheney 
has also vanquished Miss Salisbury, and she alone of all 
the women. Miss M'aud Bourn is the champion of Burlin- 
game. 

Advices from Tahiti tell of the wonderful success of 
Marie Wells and Marie Oge during their stay there. They 
were entertained by the royal family of the place in a most 
royal way, and they had several offers of marriage from the 
natives of Tahiti. Mrs. Brander, who was formerly Gertrude 
Forman, sent them letters to the Princess of Tihiti, for Mr. 
Brander is a relative of that house, and they were taken 
to their bosoms. They swam and rode a great deal. All the 
Europeans on the island thought these girls must be very 
rich, because they were so far away from home, and Mrs. 
Wells was the recipient of several offers of marriage for 
her daughter and niece. They brought back many beautiful 
curios and souvenirs of the place. Among them are some 
photographs of themselves taken in native costumes with 
a white flower sticking out from behind their ears. They 
are very becoming in them. They soon got into the Ways 
of the country, and they took so many siestas that they are 
both much rounder and rosier than when they went away. 
As they left Tahiti, my correspondent informs me. there was 
wailing and gnashing of teeth. The women watched the 
steamer depart, and hurling their flowers to the ground, 
cried out, "Oh, the beautiful ladies are gone!" 

I see that Mrs. Edith Blanding Coleman is going to Ta- 
hoe to pass a few weeks with her sister-in-law, Mrs. Gor- 
don Blanding. She was one of the most popular women in 
the State, and was a purely California product of woman- 
hood. Until nearly thirty years of age she never left Cali- 



fornia. The Brandings were of a South Carolina family, if I 
am not mistaken, and entertained the Prince of Wales when 
he came to America. Mrs. Coleman's marriage was unhappy, 
although she chose from many suitors, but she was a very 
independent woman, and I think she gave music lessons 
much against the wishes of her family. Later she came into 
some money, and is now quite comfortably off. Although no 
formal announcement of the engagement was ever made, she 
was engaged to Mr. George Davidson, the brilliant son of 
Professor Davidson, who committed suicide because he lost 
his eyesight. Mrs. Coleman is a very witty woman, and she 
is always surrounded by a court of unusual men, but she is 
one of the few women who are as fascinating to women as 
to men. 

M'rs. Partridge, nee Simpson, the wife of Bishop Partridge, 
is here, and her friends are very glad to see her. She has 
retained her same Trilby loveliness, and she seems per- 
fectly devoted to her young step-daughter, who is such a 
solid type of a maiden, shorter than her step-mother, that 
she looks almost as old. Mrs. Partridge will not return to 
Japan for two months, and when she goes she will leave 
Miss Partridge with her mother, Mrs. Simpson. The young 
girl will be educated here. 

Dr. Brownell is visiting his fiancee, Miss Pierce, at Port 
Ludlow. They are both the guests of Mrs. Cyrus Walker, 
the aunt of Miss Pierce. The engagement of Miss Pierce 
and Dr. Brownell was one of the most romantic of affairs, 
for it was love at first sight on both sides. Sophie Pierce 
has those romantic, melting brown eyes that always mean 
romance, and she certainly lived up to them, for she saw 
Dr. Brownell but half a dozen times before they became 
engaged, and her mother knew him scarcely at all. He is 
a good-looking fellow, and they are very devoted to each 
other. In the days of our grandmothers there was much 
more falling in love at first sight than now. and certainly 
there were fewer unhappy marriages than now, when every 
one makes such a fuss and ceremony over marriage. So I 
think romance is to be encouraged. 



Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott entertained a house party 
Sunday. The Tobins, Van Nesses and Chases have house 
parties over the Fourth. Mrs. Charles Bent gave a pleasant 
little tea recently at the "Town and Country Club." Mrs. 
I. Walton Thorne, accompanied by Miss Adams, is spending 
the Fourth at Napa Soda Springs as the guest of M'iss Ruth 
Adams. Miss Leila Craig, the sister of Mr. William Craig, 
has gone to the Hawaiian Islands to be absent indefinitely. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Pond left San Rafael several days ago. 
owing to illness in the family. Colonel and Mrs. D. M. 
Burns have gone to Hopland for a few weeks. Mrs. Freder- 
ick N. Woods and the Misses Lottie and Maud Woods have 
left for an Eastern trip, which will extend to Europe. Mrs. 
Daniel Callaghan, accompanied by Lieutenant and Mrs. 
James I. koby, are in Los Gatos for a two month's outing. 
Mrs. Steadman, who was Miss Deming of Sacramento, has 
been the guest of Mrs. William H. Crocker at Burlingame. 

A merry party who are having a good time over the Fourth 
at Guerneville, are Mrs. E. Dore. Mrs. B. F. Soffacker, Mrs. 
Ruby Dore Bond. Mrs. Fred McWilliams. Mrs. James Sea- 
well. M'rs. Harry Seawiell, Mr. Victor Seawell. Mrs. William 
Dodge and Miss Ruth Adams. 

San Rafaelwards there are several picnics over the Fourth. 
The Kanes, the Gibbs and Kips go to Bolinas Ridge, and the 

Visiting Cards 

Wedding Invitations 

and Announcements 
LE COUNT BROS. CO. 

533 MARKET STREET 



July 5. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



29 



Salisbury*. Keyes and Hoardmans to I.ake !.agunltas. The 
Unices, with some friends, go to Bear \ a' 

Mr. and Mrs. Asbton Potter will go abroad in Um 
future. Mrs. Oscar Kitiallan Long will pan the summer 
with her mother. Mrs. Isaac Renua. nt Piedmont Mrs. 
Fred Castle will return from the Baal and Kurope during 
the summer. Meanwhile Miss Norma Castle and Miss Char- 
Castle are In the Santa Cruz Mountains. Mr. Frank 
Carolan, who has arrived in New York, will return home 
a little Inter in the season. Mr. and Mrs. William K. Van 
derbllt. .Ir.. will remain in Paris until after the automobile 
Mrs. Zelia Xuttall and her daughter, Miss Nadine, 
are visiting friends in San Mateo, after a visit to the City 
of Mexico. Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Dreedon, accompanied by 
Mrs. Breedon'S mother. Mrs. Butler, will go to San Rafael for 
the month of August. 

Mr. and Mrs. .lames Follis will be the guests of Mr. and 
M"rs. Frank Griffith in the near future. Mr. and Mrs. Alex- 
ander Young will entertain their son and his bride, Mr. and 
Mrs. Archibald Young, at the home of the former, "Rose 
Crest." at Vernon Heights, when they arrive here. Mrs. 
.1. .1. Valentine, who is visiting in Maine, will not return 
to California for some time. Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. 
Wheeler, accompanied by Miss Essie Weis, will soon leave 
for Capitola. The George Crockers will pass the summer at 
Southampton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Dibblee are passing a few weeks at 
Bolinas. The Pierce-Brownell wedding will occur very early 
in the fall at Mrs. Talbot's home on Jackson street. Miss 
Olive Holbrook will be maid of honor. M'iss Throckmorton 
is at Napa Soda Springs. Mrs. Davenport will soon go to the 
Hotel Rafael. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Magdalene Blan- 
kart, the sister-in-law of General Funston, to Mr. Frank 
Howlett of Alameda. Mr. John Davidson, of 1438 Jackson 
street, announces the engagement of his daughter, Miss 
Mattie Davidson, to Mr. Herbert Louis Delaney. The wed- 
ding will take place the fifteenth of this month at the 
Davidson residence. Colonel and Mrs. Walter Scott Davis 
announce the engagement of their only daughter, Elizabeth, 
to Mr. Frederick F. Boumage. The wedding will take place 
at the home of the bride in Auburn. 

The wedding of M'iss Wanda Nolte and Mr. David E. 
Marchiis took place Wednesday evening at eight o'clock 
in St. Mark's church. The ceremony was performed by the 
Rev. Julius Fuendeling. The bride is a daughter of the late 
Professor William F. Nolte. Mr. Marchus is an attorney of, 
this city. The young couple will soon return from their wed- 
ding trip and reside in this city. 

Miss Alita B. Campbell, daughter of Mrs. J. A. Campbell 
and the late Judge Campbell, to Dr. J. P. Dunwoody of St. 
Louis, Mo., were married Wednesday at St. John's Episcopal 
church. The young people will make their home in Ber- 
keley. 

Mrs. Walter Hobart, after her return from the Yosemite, 
will visit her grandmother, Mrs. Neill, at San Rafael. Later 
in the season the Herrins will go to Tahoe. Mr. and M"rs. 
Stirling Postley have taken a house on Sacramento street. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robinson Riley have taken a house in town. 
Mrs. Morgan and her daughters, the Misses Therese and 
Ella, were in London recently. Mrs. Bowie-Dietrick has been 
visiting Mrs. Parrott at her home in San Mateo recently. 

Mrs. Florence P. Frank gave a six-handed euchre party 
at the Burlingame Club recently. 



NOT NECESSARY TO GO ELSEWHERE! 



Sherman, Clay & Co. 



Are Chief Purveyors of Everything Musical 

from Steinway Pianos to Ragtime Ditties. 



Today (Saturday) al San Hafnel. Is being held thl 

chase of the season, and there will !>•• a big crowd, 
for many nave gone over to the Hotel Rafael for the Fourth. 
Ward McAllister has charge Of it. and II 
success. Two beautiful nips will be given, one to 
the ladles and one to the gentlemen. 

Miss Helen Dean Is giving a large dinner at Paetori'a this 
evening, Mrs. Adam Grant gave a luncheon at Pastori's. 

Among those she entertained were Mrs. Bee. Mrs. I 
Mrs. Kip, Mrs. Hoffmann, Mrs. Sonntag, Mrs. Toy. 
Green and Mrs. Salisbury. 

The Hotel Mateo has this season seen a revolution, and 
ranks to-day as the most popular resort within easy reach 
of San Francisco. This happy result was achieved largely 
through judicious advertising and because of its excellent 
cuisine and the general competence displayed by every one 
connected with the management. 

Mr. E. F. Burns, of the Hammam baths, and family, have 
gone to the Lloyd Eaton House until the end of October. 

R. C. Holcomb, Surgeon U. S. A., Mrs. Francis Churchill 
Williams and child of Philadelphia, and Mr. and Mrs. S. W. 
Wilcox of Honolulu, are among those registered at the Occi- 
dental Hotel. 



New Things in Cameras. 
New cameras, new films, new plates, new papers. Full lines 
of fresh goods at correct prices. Also printing and develop- 
ing. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market street. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 



Southfield Wellington Coal 

recommended by the best dealers. 



" 



For Warm Weather 



let ua make for you suits of our form-iittine 



Linuret or Xyloret 



Pure Lisle 



They are not only the 
healthiest, but also the 
most comfortable gar- 
ments to" wear. If you 
prefer Silk or Wool, we can also suit you. 

UffUtM 

knitJtingco. 



Underwear 



MAKERS OF 

B/f THING SUITS 

SWEATERS 

JERSEYS 

LEGGINS 

GYM, SUITS 

60 Geary St. 

SA/il FHANCISCO, CAL. 



WEAR- 



EAGLESON'S 

Fine Shirts and 
Underwear 



748 AND 750 MARKET STREET 
242 MONTGOMERY STREET 



30 



8AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 



The Disadvantage of 

Being Grown Up 

There's once a. year when I should like to be 

A little, sawed-off crazy boy, so high, 
Without an ounce of grown-up dignity— 

And that's about the fourth day in July. 
And oh, for no position to maintain, 

And oh, for that small rapture unforgot, 
To be a tender patriot again 

And fire my crackers in a vacant lot! 

And how I passed the midnight of the Third- 
All sleepless from the echoing rack and roar. 

And how I quaked ecstatic when I heard 
The cannon of the little boy next door, 

And what increasing raptures filled my soul 
When from my bed at early dawn I got. 

And laden with potential racket, stole 
To fire my crackers in a vacant lot! 

I've dabbled with the ballot and the law, 

I've written much on treaties and canals, 
I've braved a corporation's hungry maw. 

And cursed a Senate s lobbies and cabals. 
A patriotic citizen? — alas. 

That I might feel the thrill that cometh not 
Since, rirtns eight, I scampered in the grass. 

And fired my crackers in a vacant lot! 

WALLACE IRWIN. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat-producing qualities Briquettes are superior to 
coal. Sold by the Tesla Coal Co.. 10th and Channel. 'Phone, 
South 95. 



You will meet only the best people at Zinkand's. It 

is the after-the-theatre resort of San Francisco's smart set, 
who ara attracted by the excellent refreshments, service 
and music. 



Techau Tavern is the best place in town for a bite 

after the theatre. Its central location makes it a very handy 
place to drop Into 



Overland Monthly 

An Illustrated Magazine of the West 

BRET HARTB 
Memorial Number 

The Bret Harte Memorial Number of the OVERLAND 
MONTHLY will be issued in September. 

The issue will be the most interesting and valuable maga- 
zine number ever issued. 

Among the features will appear the following: 

Sketch of the Life of Bret Harte. 

History of the OVERLAND MONTHLY. 

Bret Harte's most famous stories and poems. 

Memorial articles by noted American authors. 

Portraits of early contributors. 

Facsimiles of MSS of "Heathen Chinee." 

A collection of the best short stories by California authors. 

A tribute by Joaquin Miller. 

Sketches by the surviving contributors of the first volume 
of the OVERLAND MONTHLY. 

Articles, sketches, and reviews by Mark Twain, Noah 
Brooks, Dr. Jordan, President Wheeler, Prof. Edgar L. Lar- 
kin, and many others. 
ORDER COPIES FROM YOUR NEWSDEALER EARLY. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco. Cal. Location ol 
works — >torey County, Nevada. 

Notice !■ hereby riven that at a meeting of the Board of Director**, held 
on the 11th day of June. 1902, an oueMinent (No. 71) of ten (10) cent! 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately In United States void coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Franolsco. 
Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 16TH DAY OF JULY. 1902, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 1st day of 
August 1902, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79 Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 
Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Choiiar Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the - 'th day of June, 1902, an assessment, (No. oi) of Ave (5) cents 
p»r share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, paya- 
ble immediately in United states gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 79 Nevada Block, No- 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco. Cal. 
J I Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

24th DAY OF JULY, 1902, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction : and unless pay- 
ment Is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 14th day of August, 
1902. to pay the delinquent asBesament, together with the oust of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT. Seoretary 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street San Fran- 
cisco . Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
Works— Gold Hill, Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice U hereby given that, at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 17th day of June, 192. an assessment (No. 86) of five (5) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, payable 
immediately. In United States eold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, room 35, third floor. Mills Building, corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 22nd DAY OF JULY. 1902, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 12th day of 
August. 1902, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale- By order of the Board of Directors- 

JAMES NEWLANDS. JR., Secretary. 

Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills Building, cor. Bush and Montgomery 
streets. San Franoisoo. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 126 

Amount per share _ 10 cents 

Levied May 16, 1902 

Delinquent In office July 1, 1902 

Day of Bale of delinquent stock July 21, 1902 

E. L. PARKER. Secretary. 
Offick — Room 14, Nevada Blook, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



FOR SALE— Thirty-five feet 
of Plate Glass office partitions. 
Apply to J. Gilbert, room 84, 
Murphy Building, 1236 Market 
Street. 



Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of JAMES HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HASTY, Deceased. 

Noilce it hereby riven by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM, Admin- 
istrator of the Estate of JAMBS HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HASTY, 
Deceased, to the creditors of and all persons having claims against the 
said Decayed, to exhibit them with the necessary vouohers. within four 
months after the first publication of this notice, to the said Administrator, 
at Room 79. Chronicle Building, the same being his place for the transac- 
tion of the business of the said estate In the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. JOHN FARNHAM 

Administrator of the Estate of 
JAMES HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HASTY, Deceased 

Dated at San Francisco. June 21, 1902. 
FRANK McQOWAN 

Attorney for Administrator. 

Rooms 75, 79 and 80 Chronicle Building:. 



July S, 1902. 

A Fern That Walks 

Most fernt an- i onfirnu'd travelers, hi 
lumca of ths creeping habit of 
the under grou nd root-stocks, which arc 
ilal, the new fronds of each suc- 
ceeding year arc prone to appear at 
an appreciable distance beyond the spot 
where the crosiers of the previous sea 
son had uncurled. So, one stop a year. 
do they patiently advance In their life's 
journey and in geographical experience 
of the great world into which they 
have been born. By the average ob- 
server such slow-going — oiit-tortoising 
Brer Terrapin himself — is of course 
scarcely noticed, but there is one of 
our native ferns that steps off in so 
lively a fashion that its odd habit long 
ago caught the popular eye and fur- 
nishes one of the unceasing entertain- 
ments of the woods. 

The plant referred to is the Walk- 
ing Fern, which carpets the ledges and 
tops of shaded rocks in many places 
throughout a large part of the eastern 
United States. The slender, tufted fronds 
singularly unfernlike in appearance, 
somewhat resembling the attenuated 
isosceles triangles, squirming bashfully, 
and they walk, by declining their taper 
tips to the soil and there rooting. In 
due time clusters of new fronds spring 
from such rooted tips. By-and-bye some 
of these, too, bite the earth and, tak- 
ing root, start, still anothier colony', 
which in its turn will continue the pro- 
gress in the same manner. Naturally, 
with the lapse of time the connection 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



31 



ICA. 



akes short roads. 



light loads. 



J. ' JssW lig 

(jREASE 

^■■Wood for everything 
that runs on wheels. 

Sold Everywhere. 
. Made by STANDARD Oil. CO. 



between the older tufts and the younger 
becomes broken, yet one sometimes 
finds series of three or four linked to- 
gether, representing as many steps in 
the pretty ramble. 

A pleasant trait of the Walking Fern 
is that it is evergreen, and its cheerful 
company may be enjoyed not only in 
the summer but in midwinter as well, 
when most plants of our temperate lati- 
tudes have given up the unequal con- 
test with Jack Frost and thrown him 
their leaves. — Charles Francis Saunders 
in Country Life in America. 



..Rounder — There are two kinds of 
girls ' a fellow should never flirt with. 
Saphead — Ya-as ? Rounder — Girls who 
are so young they don't know any bet- 
ter and girls who are so old they mean 
business. — Town Topics. 



1821- A. D. 



D&SIEGMO 



The World's Bert Tonic 
Imported from Trinidad bw 



ZZ GOLD MEDALS 



LONDON 1862 PHI1APUPHIAI8J6 
VIENNA 1873 CHICAGO 1893 
LONDON 1886 BUFFALO 1901 
PARIS _ 1867, 1878, 1900 



I Unrivalled appetizing tonic and stomach corrective, recom- 
mended by physicians. A half a wine-class in sweetened water, 
aoda water or lemonade makea a delightful health-eivine 
drink for ladies and children. A few dashes in pure liquor, 
Bherry or ehampa^ne, the epicure's delieht. Refuse imitations 
and cheap substitutes. None trenuine except Dr. Rlpcert's. 
On the market 70 years. Made only by DR. J. G. B. SIEGf R'l 
&* SONS All trroeers and drueretsts. 

J. W. WUPPERMANN, Sole Agent, New York, N. Y. 
Gray, Lane & Sfcroh. Pacific Coast Agrts., San Francisco. Cal. 



SUNBEAMS 



(Stolen from Thieves. 



Senator Fairbanks is reported by the 
Washington Post as telling the follow- 
ing: In a sleeping car a man was snor- 
ing most loudly, and nobody else in the 
car could sleep. Finally it was decided 
to awaken him and compel him to quit 
snoring or stay awake. So after much 
difficulty, he was aroused. "What's the 
trouble?" he asked. "Your snoring 
keeps everybody in the car awake, and 
it has got to stop." "How do you know 
I snored?" questioned the disturber of 
the peace. "We heard you." "Well," 
said the man who snored, as he turned 
over to go asleep again, "don't believe 
all you hear." 

An Englishman went into a restau- 
rant in a New England town and was 
served for his first course with a deli- 
cacy unknown to him. So he asked 
the waiter what it was, and the waiter 
replied: "It's bean soup, sir." Where- 
upon the Englishman, in high indigna- 
tion, responded: "I don't care what it's 
been; I want to know what it is." 

Mrs. O'Lafferty — Our wee Dannie will 
make a polacemin wan day an' mar-rik 
me wurds." Mr. O'Lafferty — Phwy will 
he? Mrs. O'Lafferty — Don't th' boy 
shlape ha'f the toime? 



A lady in a Sunday-school had a class 
of small boys. Not long ago, after 
the lesson was over, as was her cus- 
tom, she began to tell them something 
about God. This time she chose the 
power of God as her theme. She told 
how "he turned the water into wine, 
opened the eyes of the blind, made the 
lame walk," and many other miracles 
illustrative of God's, power. One little 
hoy said, "I know something God can't 
do." The teacher said, "Why, that is 
wonderful. What is it? I cannot con- 
ceive of anything that God cannot do." 
The little boy replied, "He can't make 
a three-year-old colt in one day." 

Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan, Mr. Chas. 
Schwab, and several friends were at 
Mr. Morgan's kennels looking over some 
of the prize hunting dogs recently be- 
fore the first-named gentleman sailed 
for Europe. Mr. Schwab fell in love 
with a fine-looking pointer, and asked 
Mr. Morgan the dog's name. "That 
dog's name is Russell Sage," said Mr. 
Morgan. "And why do you call him 
Russell Sage?" asked Mr. Schwab. "Be- 
cause," said the great financier, "he 
never loses a scent." 

Gotlieb Schneider — I hear you haf a 
new bicycle got. Did you get much on 
it? Louie Piltzheimer — I haf neffer had 
it to a pawnshop alreatty. 



The Favorite Champagne 

Moet&CIvmdoa 



tt 



» 



WHITE SEAL 
DRY,DEL/CATE e 0EL/C/OUS. 

The gain in importations of Moet & Chandon Champagne during 190L war 
equal to more than 100 per cent of the combined increase of all other Champagne 
Houses. — "ISovfoH's Wine & Spirit Circular." 



32 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 5, 1902. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and .re due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 



leave] 



[Main Line. Foot ol Market St.) 
From Jcne 2!. 1902 



[arrive 



7:00 A Benlola, Sui.un. Elmira. and Sacramento 6|g r 

l$0 i DYvls. Woodland. Kn! E hts Landing. MarwvlUe. Orovllle 7.65 P 

!00 A Atlantic Express. Ogden and East 5;£ 

. _. _•*.. _ _ T _ II Olnnlrlnn • " *•£= 



lMASn«taESre. 9 -Davis. Williams, (for Bartlett Springs). Wil- 

• T1«J DlurT 1 Pnrllnnll - • 



8:3 oa ^!if:Sf^^ti^:^;^^^o,vx^^.. 

Marysvllle.Chtco. Red Bluff..... \;-? r 

8:30A Oakdale, Chinese. Sonora. Tuolumne... 12 : i5y 

Merced. Raymond, FreBno, and Los Angeles 8.25 A 

9:30 A ValleJo. Martinez, and way stations •., • 

lft-nDA HavwardB, Niles and way stations .......~~. k'o( . 

JSS a The Overland Llmited-Ogden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago 5.25 r 

U:O0p Sacramento River Steamers ^"V^ri-j"wim™«"'wino'wa ' 

5:00 p ^&TIS3Ki.^S^r.S: c^!r™= Wi "^: w« a 

JS P S^£1^«. ™&'^ 9:* A 

4:00p Nlles, Livermore. Stookton. Lodl ♦«■'«! 

4-80P Hay wards. Niles. San Jose. Uvermore ••••• io-<*> * 

Mop The Owl Limited-Fresno. Tulare. Bakersfleld, Saugus lor 

Santa Barbara. Los Angeles......... °2S 

5:00 p Port Costa. Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton...;. -V-f^,'" \t'tit 

sloo p Martinez. Antioch. Stookton, Merced, Raymond Fresno l-.2_> P 

7:55 A 
11:25 A 



t5:30pNlles Local 

6:00 p Haywards, Niles, and San Jose 

^'w^JESPSSSTv^^bi^l^ Chicago... <£ P 
7:00 p San Pablo. Port Costa. Martinez, and way stations.................. 11 .2> A 

s'os^O^ego^a'nd'Ca'liio'rnlaEx^ 

ding. Portland. PugetSound, and East »• 55 A 

t9:10 p Hay ward and Nlles »' '™ * 



Coast Line (Narrow Gance). (Footot Market St.) 



17-iSA Santa Cruz Excursion "'■■".': ;i!"";i"« "i" + 8:05p 

S-io A Newark. Centervllle. San Jose. Felton. Boulder Creek. Santa 

Cruz, and way stations •• SSSZT^lSmr. 

t2:15 P Newark. Centervllle. San Jose. New Almaden. Felton. Boul- 

der Creek. Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10.50 A 

4:16p Newark. San Jose. Los Oatos ra'Sn. 

64:15 P San Jose. Los Gatos. Santa Cruz wijwa 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 

From BAH Francisco— Foot ol Market street (Slip 8).-t7 :15. 9 M. and 11 :00 

* From OaIXJtp -Fo"' ol Broadway .-t6:00. t8:00. t8:05, 10;00 A. M. 12:00. 

2:00. 4:00 p.m. 

Coastline (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 



«:10 A Ban Jose and way statlonB 

t7:00A San Jose and way stations 

fT:00 a New Almaden 

"17:15 A Monterey Excursion VI".;;' a '.','" 

8-00 A Coast Line Limited— San Jose, Gllroy. Hollister. Salinas. San 
T...Ih Ohlnnn. Santa Barbara. Los Angeles and Principal lnter- 



:80p 

.30 p 

:iip 
SO P 



Luis Obispo. Santa Barbara. Los Angeles and Principal 

mediate stations ...... ...... 10. 

900 a San Jose. Tres Plnos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove. Salinas, San 

Luis Obispo, and principal Intermediate stations 4 

10:80 A San Jose and way stations * 

11=80 A San Jose. Los Gatos and wavslatlona 0: 

fll:30p San Jose and way stations J7 

12 03 p San Jose and way stations T«: 

13.00 pDel MonteExpress— Only stops San Jose...... .- ■ -■ TI2 

3 30 p San Mateo. Redwood. Palo Alto. Santa Clara. San Jose. Tres 
Pinos. Santa Cruz, Salinas. Del Monte, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove l0 

4:30 p San Jose and principal way stations 1 

15:00 p San Jose, Los Gatos. and principal way stations 9 

6:30 p San Jose and principal way stations 10 

t6:15 p San Mateo. Belmont. Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto T6 

6:30p San Jose and way stations ■ ■•■■ ■■•-■■■• 6: 

7 -OOP New OrleanB Express — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbs ra, Los 

Angeles. Deralng, El Paso, New Orleans, and East 10: 

«ll:45p Palo Alto and way stations... T9 

all :45 p San Jose and way stations - 19 

Alor Morning. p lor Afternoon. t Sundays excepted. 

1 Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

SSaturday and Sunday only. cMonday only. 

ft Dally except Saturday. 



:10 p 

:36 A 
30 I' 

:00p 

:"> a 
.01 p 



:45A 
80 p 
00 A 

Ul A 



15 A 
:45p 

:I5p 



The Union Transfer Compant will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Telephone. Exchange 83. Enquire of Ticket Agents 
lor Time Cards and other information. 

Chicago |N LESS THAN 3 Days 



FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



AT 10 A. M. 



CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars, Bufiet, Smoking and 
Library Cara, with barber. Dining Cars— meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. in. The best of everything. 

R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

817 Market St. Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



CAL N. W. RY. CO., Le " ee « S. F. «* N. P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tiepxon Firbv — Foot of Market Street 
WEEK DATS— 7:30. 9:00. 11:00 a.m.; 1235, 3:30. 5:10, 6:30 p.m. Thursdays— 
Extra Trip at 11:30 p.K. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 1130 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 930.11:00 A.M.; 130. 330. 6:00. 630 P.M. . 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAT*— 6:10, 730. 930. 11:10 A.M.: 12:45. 3:40. 6:15 P.M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 35 and 6 35 P.M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10.9:40 11:10 A.M., 1:40.8:40 6:05.6:25 P.M. 

Between San Franctsoo and Schuetzen Park, same sohedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 


In Effect Apr. 28. 1901 

Destinations 
Novato 
Petal uma 

Santa Rosa 


Arrive at San Franolioo 


Week days 
730 AM 
330 PM 
6:10 pm 


Sundays 
8:00 AM 
9:30 AM 
5:00 PM 


Sundays 1 Week days 
10:40 am 1 8:40 am 
6:05 PM 10:26 AM 
7:35 PM 1 6:20 PM 


730 AM 

8:80 pm 


5:00 pm 
8:00 AM 


Fulton. Windsor. 

Healdsburg. Lytton. 

Qeyserville. Cloverdale 


10:40 AM 1 1036 AM 
7:36 pm 1 6:20 Pm 


7:30 AM 
8:30 PM 


5*0 PM 1 n.^i.^j Tnvt.i. 1 10 ^0 AM 1 M25 AM 
8:00 AM 1 Hopland. Ukiah | 7:36 PK | 8;2 r M 


7:30 AM 
830 PM 


81OO AM 1 „„_ .„ 1 10:40 am | 10:J5 AM 

5*0 PM 1 Gueraeville | 7:35,,, | 6a0 PM 


7:30 AM 
5:10 Pm 


8:00 AM 1 Sonoma 1 9:16 AM 1 8:40 AM 
5:00 pm 1 Glen Ellen I 0:05 PM 1 6:20 PM 


7:30 AM 
S:s0 pm 


8:00 am 1 =.»...,„„, 1 10:40 AM 1 10:25 am 
5:00 pm 1 Sebastopol | 7:3e PM | , :20 PM 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



^ 



Steamers leave San Fran- 
cisco as follows: 

For Ketchikan. Juneau, Treadwetra, Douglas City, 
Skaguay. etc, Alaska, 11 a.m. : July 5. 10, 15. 20. 25. 30: Aug. 
1. Chance to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B- C and Puget Sound Ports, 11 a. *. July 
5. 10, 15. 20, 25. 30; Aug. 4- 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1:80 p. M. July 1.6, 11 
16,21,20.31: Aug. 5. 

For Loa Angelas (via Port Loi Angeles and Redondo), 
San Diego and Santa Barbara, " Santa Rosa." Sundays, 9 A, M. : 
State of California. Thursdays: 9 a. m. 

For Los Angelet. via San Pedro and Bast San Pedro, Santa Barbara, 
Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon. Cayucos. Port Harford (San Lull 
Obispo) Ventura. Hueneme. and 'Newport. (*Corona only.) 

Corona, 9 a. m.. July 5, 13. 21. 29. 
Coos Bay. 9 a. m., July 1. 9, 17, 25; Auk. 2. 
For Mexican Ports. 10 a.m.. July 8; Aug 7. 
For further information obtain folder. 
Right Is reserved to chance steamers or sailing dates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 
GOODAIX, PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts. 
C. D. DONANN, Gen. Passenger Agent. 

10 Market St., San Franoleco. 

SS "Alameda." for Honolulu. Sat. July 12, 2 p. m. 
SS •'Australia." for Tahiti, Tuee , July 15. 10 a. m. 
S3 "Ventum, "for Australia. Thura July 21, lOa.m 
Line to Ooolgardie, Australia, and Capetown. 
South Africa, 

J.D. SPRECKELS&BROS.CO. 
Agents, 643 Market Street. Freight Office. 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 

Incorporated Under Royal Charter 1840. 
— and— 

Compania Sud-Americana De-Vapores 

First-Class Twin Screw Passenger Steamers 

From SAN FRANCISCO to Mexico. Central America, Panama, Guayaquil 

Callao, Valparaiso, and all Ports on the East and West 

Coast of South America. 

Sailing from Howard 3. Pier 10, 12 M- 

Ahequipa July 1. 1902 

Perd July 23, 1902 

Guatemala „ August 2. 1902 

Colombia August 15, 1902 

These steamers are built expressly for Central and South American pas- 
senger service. {No change at Panama.) Freight and passenger office, 316 
California Street. 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE &, CO., General Agents. 





Illinois Central 
Railroad 



EFFICIENTLY SERVES 
A VAST TERRITORY 



DIRECT CONNECTION WITH 

OVERLAND LIMITED at Omaha for Chicago and points East- 

with SUNSET LIMITED at New Orleans for Louiiville, 

Cincinnati and points East. 

POUR PERSONALLY CONDUCTED EXCURSIONS WEEKLY 



H. SNEDAKER, GENERAL AGENT 
646 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



STATEMENT OF THE 

Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 



A CORPORATION 



And where said assets are situated, dated June 30, 1902. 



ASSETS. 

1 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby 
secured, the actual value of which is $23,362,457 31 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts is as follows: They are all existing con- 
tracts, owaed by said corporation, and are pay- 
able to it at its office, which is situated at 
the corner of Market, McAllister and Jones 
streets, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. State of California, and the payment 
thereof is secured by First Mortgages on Real 
Estate within this State and the States of 
Oregon and Washington. Said Promissory 
Notes are kept and held by said Corporation 
at its said office, which is its principal place 
of business, and said Notes and debts are 
there situated. 

2 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby 
secured, the actual value of which is 311,500 00 

lie condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts is as follows: They are all existing con- 
tracts owned by said Corporation, and are pay- 
able to it at its office, which is situated as 
aforesaid, and the payment thereof is secured 
by "Northern Railway Company of California 

5 per cent Bonds." "Southern Pacific Railroad 
Company of California 6 per cent Bonds," 
"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Rail- 
way Company 5 per cent Bonds," "Market 
Street Railway Company First Consolidated 
Mortgage 5 per cent Gold Bonds," "Park and 
Cliff House Railway Company 6 per cent 
Bonds," "Spring Valley Water Works First 
Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds," "Spring Valley 
Water Works Second Mortgage 4 per cent 
Bonds," "Pacific Gas Improvement Company 
First Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds," and "The 
Omnibus Cable Company First Mortgage 6 
per cent Bonds," the market value of all said 
Bonds being $365,695 00. Said Notes are kept 
and held by said Corporation at its said office, 
and said Notes and Bonds are there situated. 

3 — Bonds of the United States, the actual 
value of which is 22,088,423 43 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are kept 
and held by it in its own -vaults, and are there 
situated. They are "Registered 4 per cent of 
1907 ($18,500,000 00) and 4 per cent of 1925 
($1,500,000 00) and 3 per cent of 1908 ($500,- 
000 00) United States Bonds," and are payable 
only to the order of said Corporation. 

4 — Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of 
which is 6,473,982 17 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: 
They belong to said Corporation, and are kept 
and held by it in its own vaults, and are there 
situated. They are "Market Street Cable Rail- 
way Company 6 per ■ cent Bonds ($1,006,- 
000 00)," "Market Street Railway Company 
First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds 
($339,000 00)," "Sutter Street Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds ($150,000 00)," "Powell 
Street Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds 
($50,000 00)," "The Omnibus Cable Company 

6 per cent Bonds ($82,000 00)," "Presidio and 
Ferries Railroad Company 6 per cent Bonds 



($30,000 00)," "Northern Railway Company 
of California 6 per cent Bonds ($584,000 00)," 
"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds ($387,000 00)," 
"Southern Pacific Railroad Company of Cali- 
fornia 6 per cent Bonds ($1,25y,000 00)," "San 
Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds ($25,000 00)," 
"West Shore Railroad Company of New York 
4 per cent Bonds (416,000 00)," "Spring Valley 
Water Works First mortgage 6 per cent Bonds 
($100,000 00)," "Spring Valley Water Works 
Second Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($462,- 
000 00)," "Spring Valley Water Works Third 
Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($1,020,000 00)," 
and "City of San Luis Obispo 5 per cent Bonds 
($20,250 27)." 

5 — Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued 
to July 1, 1902 300,498 29 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($560,520 23), and 
in the Counties of Santa Clara ($244,140 03), 
Alameda ($164,279 79), and San Mateo ($24,- 
346 21), in this State, the actual value of 
which is 993,286 26 

(b) The land and building in which said cor- 
poration keeps its said office, the actual value 
of which is 571,414 99 

The condition of said Real Estate is that it 
belongs to said corporation, and part of it is 
productive. 

7 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver 
Coin, belonging to said Corporation, and in 
its possession, and situated at its said office; 
actual value 1,195,366 04 

Total Assets $55,296,928 49 

LIABILITIES. 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amount- 
ing to and the actual value of which is $52,106,883 46 

The condition of said Deposits is that they 
are payable only out of said assets, and are 
fully secured thereby. 

2— Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3,190,045 03 

Total Liabilities $55,296,928 49 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY,. 

By ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
State of California, City and County of San Francisco, ss. 
JAMES R. KELLY and ROBERT J. TOBIN, being each 
separately duly sworn, each for himself, says: That said 
JAMES R. KELLY is President and that said ROBERT J. 
TOBIN is Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND 
LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and 
that the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 
1902. 

GEO. T. KNOX, Notary Public. 
In and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of 
California. 




The Automobile at War. 

British supply train fording creek in South Africa. 

With S. F. Xews Letter. July 12, 1902. 
(Courtesy "The Automobile Magazine.") 



Price, 10c p«r copy. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1880. 



Annual Subscription, 14.00 







Vol. LXV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 12 - 1902 - 



Number 2. 



The S»n Francisco MEW< LETTER Is printed and Published every Satu 
day by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott, 11a leek building, 330 8ansom e 
street, San Francisco. Cal 

Entered at Sin Francisco Postofflce as second-class matter. 

N*ew York office — -where information may be obtained reeardine subscrip- 
tions and adv rtlslngi 3>S Brosdway, C. C. Mnrphy epresenlatlvc 

London office — a) Cornhlll, E. O. Encland, George Street & Co. representa- 
tive. 

Boston— 36 Bloomtlcld street. W. H. Paeeett representative. 

All soe'al items, announcements, advertising or other matter, intended for 
pub ication in the current number of the NEWS LET 1ER should be sent 
to this office not later than 5 p. m Thursday previous to day of issue. 

It is rumored that the Kansas and Colorado prohibition- 
ists are about to bury the hatchet. 



The stone throwing Omaha strikers have ceased to be 
railroad men, and have become stone workers. 



President Schwab, of the steel trust, is to have a new 
house, to cost $2,000,000. Moral: Become president of a 
steel trust. 



President Roosevelt, in announcing his intention of vis- 
iting the Pacific Coast, reveals a courage that is hyper- 
strenuous. 



If the cholera had started earlier in the Philippines the 
United States might have pacified the islands with a cor- 
poral's guard. 



Joseph Wise, who threw a bunch of lighted fire crackers . 
into a crowd of women on July 4th, is a living proof that 
there is nothing in a name. 



The pistol has led as a means of suicide this week, with 
carbolic acid as a close second. The pursuit of Tracy is 
proving a popular means of exit up North. 



Decoration Day should be celebrated after the Fourth of 
July, for then there is a great demand for flowers to be 
laid on little new-made mounds. 



The statement by the Department of Agriculture that 
mosquitoes cause malaria has little interest for San Fran- 
cisco, which has neither mosquitoes nor malaria. 



San Franciscans who are dissatisfied with the way our 
one set of municipal officers conducts affairs, should think 
of poor San Jose, which has two sets. 



The Examiner's allegations of corruption in the police 
department would receive more credence if that paper 
would make less noise and produce more proof. 



Peace has been officially declared in the Philippines. 
Good! The next thing to do is to bring about actual peace 
— which, probably, only a few of us will live to see. 



Veteran George Gilmore, of Oakland, who died without dis- 
closing the hiding place of $8,000 which he had buried, has 
left a legacy for mediums and spiritualists. 



Secretary Root has disapproved General Miles' selection 
of Captain Van Vliet as a member of his staff. Captain Van 
Vliet needn't feel badly over it; Secretary Root would have 
disapproved any selection General Miles might have made. 



Doesn't explorer Andrees going to the North Pole in a 
haloon and being killed by Eskimos remind you of the man 
who escaped from a train wreck and died of a sore throat? 



It is said that the Ancient Order of Hibernians celebrated 
the Fourth of July. Happy Hibernians! Kind heaven has 
given them two Independence days a year — July 4th and 
March 17th. 



The dispatches speak of the "survivors" of an automobile 
contest. It had generally been supposed that the alleged 
fatalities connected with automobiling were merely comic 
weekly jokes. 



The Kaiser's politeness to M'r. J. Pierpont Morgan would 
lead us to believe that Wilhelm is about to admit the Ameri- 
can into the close corporation of which "himself and Gott" 
are at present the only members. 



Again is Ambassador Choate suffering abuse, this time 
for leaving a Fourth of July banquet in London to attend 
a reception at the India office. It's wrong to pronounce 
judgment on Mr. Choate without seeing the banquet menu. 



In Butte, Montana, Tuesday night, one pugilist knocked 
another out in twelve seconds of actual fighting. So dif- 
ferent from the Jeffrles-Fiizsimmons contest, which will 
probably consist of about twelve rounds of fake fighting, 
with no knock-out — or a pretended one, if any. 



Work on the new customs house will be delayed until the 
post-ohlce has been finished. That means that the next 
generation may probably see the customs house completed. 
This generation, which will have to pay for it, has a de- 
cided grievance. 



Lieutenant Frederick T. Arnold, Fourth Cavalry, has been 
acquitted of the water cure charges brought against him, 
but the War Department has charged him. with laxness in 
vigilance. Probably Lieutenant Arnold's carelessness con- 
sisted in using water where kerosene would have brought 
better results. 



Another respectable citizen was assaulted by a gang of 
young hoodlums Saturday night while pursuing his peace- 
able way homeward. Dear little boys, they must have 
their fun. Of course, it would be propel' to arrest them, 
but the Examiner objects to the arrest of young hoodlums — 
so we will have to allow the continued assault of respect- 
able citizens. Besides, these hoodlums, if left alone, will 
grow up to be criminals, and will furnish lots of sensations 
for the Examiner readers of the future. 



Another danger point has been passed. A lot of "Saints," 
as they call themselves, gathered at Binghampton, New 
York, and waited patiently for four days for the second 
coming of Christ, and the concurrent destruction of the 
world. Neither event happened, but they say they will 
receive a "sure" message within a few days, and that the 
affair will be pulled off without a hitch next time. Mean- 
while, the careless old world goes wagging on, regardless 
of the warning of these "Saints." Foolish world! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



EXIT HORSE, ENTER AUTO. 
This week we present as our frontispiece an engraving 
taken from a photograph of an automobile locomotive carry- 
ing a train of cars laden with provisions across the South 
African veldt, fording rivers and climbing hills. This ma- 
chine was regularly employed by the British army in their 
late war, and its tests were universally successful. Who of 
the scoffers who jeered the automobile some five years 
ago would lampoon the horseless carriage to-day in the face 
of such an achievement? The horseless carriage is no longer 
a wonder, and no longer a fad. It is an accepted fact in 
the progress of civilization. Already the sturdy little "tuf- 
tuf" is rolling smoothly through the Yosemite valley, climb- 
ing the Sierras and scaling the even more difficult heights 
of San Francisco. Our city, in fart, lias been Hi" supreme 
test of the automobile's endurance, and the machine has won 
out most gloriously. The automobile business in this city 
is a sound and lucrative financial proposition, the supply 
is enormous, but the demand is far in excess. As a pleas- 
.ure vehicle the automobile is already firmly established. 
Its next move is to invade the realm of commerce. As trucks, 
express and delivery wagons, automobiles have been tried 
with uniform success here as elsewhere. Their superior 
speed, their endurance, their easy management, have made 
them especially handy for business purposes, and their use 
as such is becoming daily more general. The automobile 
is a civilizer. With its increasing use must come many pub- 
lic reforms. The litter of horses will no longer disfigure 
our streets. City Governments will yield to public opinion, 
and paving will be improved. Good roads will be the rule 
in city and country. The puff of the motor is in the air. 
Farewell, old family horse! Our milk, our groceries, our 
laundry, our relatives, will soon be delivered by automobile. 



the wholesale district, but things are changing, and this 
locality is being deserted for the south side. The north 
side property owners should awaken to the fact that tenants 
desire decent buildings for the conduct of their business. 
Even if their pride in the appearance of the city does not 
inspire tLem to make improvements, their own business 
interests should impel them to do so. 



OUR DISGRACEFUL WATERFRONT. 

Most of the visitors who come to San Francisco arrive jy 
way of the ferries, and their first impression of the city, 
after they pass through the ferry building, is gained from a 
view of our waterfront. The first thing to attract, or rather 
catch, the eye, is East street, which winds its dirty, crooked 
way along the eastern edge of town. Wharves border the 
eastern side of the street, the western side of it consists 
of a lot of dilapidated, ramshackle buildings, mostly one 
or two stories in height, all of them old, few of them fit for 
habitation. At least two-thirds of them are used as saloons 
of the cheapest and lowest character — steam-beer "joints," 
in which the robbing of sailors is a thriving industry. 
Sacramento, Clay, Washington and Jackson streets end 
here, and the lower portions of them are little, if any. Im- 
provement on East street. The buildings are little better 
in character, and the tenants are about the same, except 
that the saloons are not quite so plentiful. Instead are a 
lot of cheap, dirty lodging houses and sailor boarding 
houses. This is the entrance to San Francisco — the first 
view a visitor receives of the town. If he walks up through 
the wholesale district on the north side he will find little 
improvement. Battery, Front, Drumm and Davis" streets 
have few decent, modern buildings, and some of them are 
on the verge of collapse. They are dangerous in many ways. 
They are unsanitary, for one thing, and they furnish fuel 
for a destructive fire. If the owners have not enough pride 
in their property to erect decent buildings, the city should 
take a hand and compel them to do so. They can find 
plenty of buildings there that should be condemned. This 
is especially true of those nearest tne front. They are a 
glaring disgrace to the city. 

The owners of this property are receiving just retribution. 
Within the past few months a building boom has struck 
tne south side of Market street. Along Mission street, be- 
low Third, a number of fine, modern business buildings have 
gone up, and they are finding plenty of tenants. The north 
side of Market street, below Montgomery, has always been 



FORCE THE VAGABONDS TO WORK. 
Visitors returning from interior points throughout the 
Northern portion of the State all voice the general complaint 
of fruit growers regarding a scarcity of help to preserve 
the crop. In every town passed through notices could be seen 
posted up, "Wanted immediately: Men, Women and Chil- 
dren to pick fruit. Good wages paid." Down at Los Gatos 
the largest fruit packing factory is running night and 
day with 350 hands, who earn all the way from $1.50 to $2.50 
per day. There are Stanford students there, taking a vaca- 
tion, and putting away a little money to tide them over the 
months of study later on, side by side with girls in search 
of fresh air and a little pin money, and children, the latter 
under twelve years, earning at the rate of $1.50 per day. 
They have been working now for a month, and will likely 
find steady employment for three months to come. Yet 
this factory is not working full handed, and is advertising 
for one hundred more people willing to earn a livelihood. 
And yet the main thoroughfares of San Francisco are 
packed with idle loafers who molest pedestrians with ap- 
peals for beer money. Oakland and Alameda housewives 
are pestered to death with tramps begging for meals. All 
of them are too lazy to work, so long as charitable people 
are willing to supply their needs or a free lunch counter 
can be reached in the down town precincts. Every sensible 
resident and taxpayer must admit there is something radi- 
cally wrong when such a condition of affairs can prevail. 
The police should be charged with the duty of whipping all 
idle vagabonds of the kind out of town, when they will be 
forced to earn their livelihood in the fields and orchards of 
the State. A chain gang where harder manual labor could 
be enforced might give the loafers of the city a choice 
between two evils, and lead them to undertake a milder 
form of exercise in the interests of the farmer and fruit 
grower. As it is, the bulk of the fine fruit crop of California 
will be a dead loss, to our shame and injury, while the means 
are at hand to save it. It has been decided that Chinese 
shall not be allowed to come here and earn a living, and the 
vagabond class refuse to earn one. M'eanwhile the crops 
are rotting. It is a serious problem. 



THE IRISH TURN AGAINST YORKE. 
One would think that the turmoil in which Father Yorke 
manages to keep himself while in San Francisco would be 
enough to satisfy even a man of his combative tempera- 
ment. For several years he has been constantly before the 
public eye, and nearly always has been conspicuous on ac- 
count of the disturbance he was raising. It is surprising to 
find that all this has not been enough for him. but such 
is the fact. The Gael, an Irish paper published in New 
York, and devoted to the preservation of the Gaelic language 
and the literature, art and folk-lore of Ireland, devotes 
two pages of its June number to him, and shows the gentle- 
man in rather an unfavorable light. 

It seems that during all the time Father Yorke has been 
stirring up labor troubles and running gambling games in 
San Francisco, he has also been interfering with the affairs 
of the Catholic University at Washington. D. C, and has 
tried to persuade its directors to conduct it according to his 
ideas. 

When the Chair of Celtic was established in the Catho- 
lic University, Rev. Dr. Henebry was selected as its occu- 
pant, being engaged for a term of three years. He proved 
to be unfit for the position, so when his term expired, the 



July 12, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



■■r» unanimous!) | to re-appoint him. i 

Cork*, who was his Mend ami who wished through him 
i power in the G ■ in Am.ri, m. demand- 

on his ra-appolntmont, ami succeeded in getting ■ 

his r.-lntii. ia national officers of the League. He 

ids the directors to re-Instate Dr. Henebry, 
though, su ever stales he haa been pouring co 
upon the Catholic University, alleging, anions other tilings. 
that $50,000 of the funds have been misappropriated. The 

managers ami directors of this university are among the 
most exalted Catholic laymen ami clergymen in the United 
States — men beside whom forks is as a mouse to an 
elephant. He has no grievance against the University; 
he was not allowed to have a hand in managing its affairs. 
and is venting his spite by slandering it. 

The Gaelic, in speaking of Father Yorke, says that he is 
"a practical politician of the Croker type much more than 
he is a churchman." The Gaelic is right, but it might have 
gone further and still kepc within the bounds of truth. 
Father Yorke is a noisy disturber of the worst class. Strikes 
are his specialty, and whether the strikers are right or 
wrong, he is always on their side on account of the cneap 
popularity it gives him. His management of the Irish Fair, 
where he had a lot of swindling gambling games introduced, 
at which children were not only permitted but encouraged 
to play, is fresh in everybody's mind. 

Father Yorke's record brings a blush of shame and indig- 
nation to the cheeks of the decent Catholic people of ban 
Francisco. They feel keenly the disgrace he is bringing 
upon their church, and have nothing but words of condemna- 
tion for him. The respectable portion of the people here 
look upon him as one of the most dangerous men in San 
Francisco. The Catholic University and the Gaelic League 
will do well to utterly repudiate him. His connection with 
either of them can only bring about trouble. 



THE KAISER AND HIS YACHT. 
Emperor William often moves in a mysterious way his 
eccentricities to perform. He sent all the way to America 
to have his yacht, the Meteor, built, and he sent his brother, 
Prince Henry, to see her launched, and he delighted the 
hearts of all good Americans by capturing Miss Roosevelt 
to do the christening, and set all our great cities wild over 
the visit of Prince Henry. A suspicious world was curious 
as to what it all meant. Was he after an American alliance 
or what? Well, the Meteor went to her destined home. 
He went out to sea to meet her, took charge of her helm, 
sailed her, played with her, and sent Miss Roosevelt a tele- 
gram of congratulations on the "beauty" she had sent him. 
The boat was taken to Kiel, put in first-class trim, and on uer 
trial trips seemed to fly past the yachts of all nations then 
visiting that harbor. At last a day was fixed for a regatta 
under the auspices of the Imperial Yacht Club. The Em- 
peror and the royal family were present, the visitors were 
numerous, the day fine, and everything promised "a glorious 
time." The Meteor was in the race, steered by the Emperor 
himself, but horrible to relate, he managed to pass the win- 
ning point just two hours behind the conquering boat, a 
German built yacht named the Iduna. It was a shameful 
beat. The news was flashed to M'r. William Downey, the 
Meteor's builder, in New York, and he was at first dumb- 
founded. He said at last that "it was an impossible result. 
The Kaiser expected her to be the fastest boat afloat, and 
he would not be disappointed." Later in the day the Kaiser 
presided at the Yacht Club's dinner, and was publicly con- 
doled with. When he replied, he said he was "perfectly de- 
lighted with the performance of the Meteor. It was another 
instance of the unbounded courtesy of Americans. They 
could build a yacht to beat all creation, but they would not 
build one to beat a woman." The Iduna. he announced, was 
owned and sailed by his Empress. 



TALKS WITH THE COLONIAL PREMIERS. 
Colonial Secretary Chamberlain appears to be a mud 
Important personage in London Jusl now than any oar ,,r 

the Colonial Premiers, tie has nothing in particular i 

whilst they are as ready to chatter as are their native 
cockatoos. Mr. Chamberlain, able politician us he is. really 

knows nothing of the men who in the colonies vote on a 

basis or universal suffrage, and do not think it Inconsistent 

to be passionate imperialists at the same time. They 
realise, as he does not, that they have a destiny to work out 
for which they must prepare. They must either go into busi- 
ness on their own account or federate an empire of which 
they may form a constituent part. They are hard-headed 
men, very capable of taking counsel with themselves. They 
know what they want, and when the right time comes 
are not going to be afraid to ask for it. Mr. Chamberlain, 
whom we have no desire to belittle, gets credit in England 
for bringing about the present happy conditions of affairs 
between the mother country and the colonies. Pshaw! 
He had no more to do with it than has a fly to do with the 
revolution of the wheel that is named after it. Loyalty is in 
the blood of the colonial, and he could no more help rushing 
to the aid of the mother country when in distress than he 
could refrain from believing himself a more effective soldier 
than Tommy Atkins. The same thing would have happened 
if Mr. Chamberlain had never lived. His merit has been 
that, unlike other British statesmen, he knew how to leave 
the colonies alone to manage their own business to suit 
themselves, and they have done it, and done it so well that 
they feel as light hearted as a parcel of school boys let 
loose to enjoy a holiday. That is what they are in England 
for. In their desire for "a good time" they are quite 
Americanized. Nothing serious in the way of business will 
be accomplished at this time. They will set John Bull 
thinking about his played-out policies, and then leave bim 
alone to chew the cud of reflection. Lord Salisbury was 
quite right the other day when he said that time was fast 
solving colonial and imperial policies, and that nothing was 
to be gained by pushing them. Meanwhile, Uncle Sam 
could swap some tariff advantages with the colonies to his 
great benefit. 



AUSTRALASIANS CANNOT SAY "PING-PONG." 

To say that the British take their pleasures sadly is to 
say a trite thing, but to say that the British colonies 
are taking ping-pong sadly is to put a new collar on an old 
dog. To be literal, New Zealand and Australia are not tak- 
ing ping-pong at all, for the proprietors of that tyrannical 
game have, for reasons best known to themselves, issued 
an injunctive edict prohibiting all Australasian newspapers 
from using the name "ping-pong." At first glance it would 
appear that the English company acted merely in the name 
of humanity in suppressing a word which all good Califor- 
nians know is becoming insufferably tiresome. But such 
does not seem to be entirely the case, for there is some 
selfish motive, no matter how deep, behind the action of the 
corporation. Perhaps the proprietors of the game had been 
reading the newspaper jokes and grew exceeding wroth 
at the idea of ping-pong becoming a by-word and a jest. 
Or perhaps there is a Yankee head to the firm who has 
schemed the suppression of the printed w:ord "ping-pong" 
as merely a monumental advertising dodge. Whatever 
the cause, the Australasian journals are referring to "ping- 
pong" as "the game without a name," "the unmentionable," 
or even demurely as "table tennis." Meanwhile the word 
flares blatantly in every daily, weekly, monthly and catch- 
penny sheet in the United States, the ping-pong poet writes 
rhymes about Hongkong and competes for a prize, and the 
poor American public fans itself wearily, hoping in vain 
that the irate proprietors will come over to this country 
and take that mawkish word out of the mouth of the press. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



Reminiscences No. 16 



By an Old Newspaper Man. 

In the middle sixties Mr. Henry 
Henry George as a George was one of the characters 
Newspaper Man in the journalistic field of San Fran- 
cisco. He probably was associated 
with the starting of more newspapers than any other man 
known to California. Had they lived he would have ex- 
ceeded the record of Mr. William Randolph Hearst. But 
there was always a strange fatality about them. Do what 
l.e could they wouldn't "go." It may be said that they all 
"died a-borning." A man of exceptional mental activity, 
his brain was as full of mischief as an egg is full of meat. 
He could pull a leg, handle a wire, and put up a job as well 
as the smartest politician of his day, but for all that he was 
not a success as a newspaper builder. He was backed by 
outside capital time and time again, and in his last attempt 
to revive the drooping fortunes of the Evening Post he had 
the great wealth of Senator John P. Jones to draw upon. But 
all to no purpose. It was not only not in him to build up 
a great newspaper, as Charles De Young did, but he could 
not even for long "get out" a little country sheet such as 
his Sacramento Reporter was. It is no detraction from 
Mr. George's acknowledged abilities in other directions to 
say that he was a failure at the newspaper business. That 
is the record, distasteful as it may be to his many friends. 
ne, however, had enough success in his life time to justify 
much of the laudation of his admirers, who aie wont to 
meet once a year to honor his memory. 

It is not given to every man to create 

He Created a a new cult. Mr. George's "Single Tax" 

New Cult. proposition has enlisted the approval and 

support of hundreds of persons all over 
the country, and he has left more and warmer disciples 
to propagate his ideas than did the author of the Sermon en 
the Mount. But then, so did Joe Smith, the Mormon, and 
even Johann Most, the socialist, has more followers in the 
land to-day than there are single taxers. Of course, the 
many honest and sincere men who believe in raising all 
revenue, national. State and county by means of a tax 
on land, are not to be classed with such men as Most in 
point of character, though what the difference is intellectu- 
ally does not appear. That among the Single Taxers there 
are men of considerable intellectuality admits of no doubt. 
But they are politicians every one. Perhaps the ablest of 
them is Mr. Tom L. Johnson, who as Mayor of Cleveland, 
Ohio, is striving to bring about the municipal ownership 
of all public utilities in that city. He says: "Tax the land 
and with the proceeds buy up all the public utilities, but 
first of all tax them too, so that the city can get them for 
little or nothing." In an interview recently published, he 
says: "Private ownership in land is a special privilege 
which should be destroyed by the operation of the Single 










Tax. With that privilege abolished, the country would 
soon adjust itself to a higher industrial and social plane." 
Just how that condition of things is to be brought about 
by wiping out, by means of a single tax, the great agricul- 
tural interests of the country, Mr. Johnson does not venture 
to make obvious to common sense, nor did Mr. George. 
That people are to be rendered happy and prosperous by 
means of a direct tax, or a tax of any sort, is a doctrine 
that surpasseth all understanding. A tax takes money out of 
one's pocket, but does not put it in. Pull Mt. Johnson up 
with that proposition, just as Mr. George was often pulled 
up with it, and he will pour a flood of gibberish upon you 
taken from single tax writings, possessing neither rhyme, 
leason nor common sense. That the single tax is a cinch 
proposition, calculated to take the fancy of all enemies 
of vested rights is apparent on its face. 

The single tax did not always 

The Single Tax an take on the form it now possesses. 

Imported Idea. It did not originate with Mr. George 

at all. but was instead an impor- 
tation. Australia in her early days suffered from a cause 
by no means unknown in California. Vast blocks of land had 
got into the hands of private individuals, and the burning 
question arose as to how to get it out again. Finally, there 
was a general concensus of opinion that a graduated land 
tax would effect the purpose. All holdings under 160 acres 
were not to be taxed at all, but above that the tax rose and 
rose until it became confiscatory. The purpose was not to 
raise revenue, but to bring about the sub-division of tne 
land. As an illiterate member of Parliament blurted out 
in debate: "Our object is to bust up the big estates." It 
was at that time a worthy object, and the law might not be 
an unmixed evil if applied to California right now. But, 
as the reader must see, its purpose was very different 
from that of the proposed single tax. Mr. George could not 
follow the Australian precedent because the Constitution 
of the United States provides for equal taxation. With 
the graduating feature eliminated, the single tax became in 
fact a proposal to confiscate all landed property, than which 
no more monstrous proposition ever emanated from a hu- 
man mind. 

In the process of obtaining his Aus- 

Good Deeds to be tralian education in this city from a 

Remembered. friend, Mr. George picked up the 

single tax idea. He did more — he 
learned the operations of the Australian ballot law, and of 
the Torrens Land Transfer act, and these he did more to 
popularize throughout the United States than any speaker 
or writer of his time. The Torrens act has for some time 
been the law in Cook county, Illinois, and a commission ap 
pointed by the Legislature of California reported in favor of 
its adoption in this State several years ago, but nothing has 
ever been done about it. The Australian ballot is now the 
law of a majority of our States, and has done much to purify 
our elections. No one thinks of abandoning it. For his 
excellent work in promoting the passage of these measures. 
Mr. George's memory deserves to be honored, and if he never 
did anything else, it cannot be denied that his life had i.s 
successes. Yet we fear that most people forget that he 
ever did those things. The bad that a man does lives after 
him. whilst the good is oft interred with his bones. Poor 
Henry George has gone to his long home, and is remembered 
almost solely for his connection with a proposal that will 
grow odious with time, whilst his really good work is hardly 
remembered even by his friends. 

It is really amazing the tendency 

How People Like there is in this world to run after 

To Be Humbugged, false gods. The new Elijah who 

has built up a Zion in Illinois and 

is feathering his nest with remarkable success, Is not the 

first or only false prophet of these days of vaunted enllght- 



July 12, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



( common 
- ami Irarnrd universities like to be bumtrai 
pa} for it. too, wiiii cheerful alaci indei 

the new Elijah, led Ban Fraiu lai a • <• re 
»iili hardly enough money to earn him to Chicago. H 
laughed ami Jeered at In this city, and 
in the street* of atelbourna, Australia n>- put up a dlffi 
kind of CBtni' In Chicago, ami its su. lay "lip of 

tin' wonders of this continent The Prophet Priest and king 
of a host of followers, who deem it their religious duty to 
pay tithi's uf all they possess Into his treasury, he is rap- 
iilly becoming rich. Henry George did nol himself claim 
any divine revelations, but his followers have been claim 
inn them for him since his death. They declare that only 
a being divinely Inspired could have formulated the single 
i.i\ Ides, lis munificence to humanity is held to be too 
great to have originated in the mind of a mere man. Ukr 
the moral law. it must have had a divine origin. Yet. as 
we have seen, its sole aim is to confiscate property — the 
Kieat god of all instituted propel ty rights. God gave to 
Abraham, Lot, Job and others lands on which to feed their 
flocks. Christ said to the rich man, "Go and sell all that 
thou hast and give to the poor." He did not say, "Take 
thy neighbor's property and give the proceeds to the poor!" 
Not at all. That would be theft, and the divine command 
says: "Thou shalt not steal." 

The single takers' Bible is a 
The Single Taxers' Bible, book written by Mr. George 
entitled "Progress and Pov- 
erty. That book, by the way, had an origin that is not gen- 
erally known. Mr. George was an incorrigible lobbyist 
for cinch bills at the legislature. Among the bills of this 
class that he got through was one to appoint an Inspector 
of Gas Meters for San Francisco. He induced Governor 
Irwin to appoint him the Inspector at a salary of $250 a 
month. He occupied the office for two years as a sinecure, 
and it was abolished as being useless. Mr. George made 
haste to make his peace with the gas company, and he and 
it got along swimmingly. People everywhere throughout 
the city asked, "What is Henry George doing in his new 
office?" As it would have been inconvenient to answer, 
Mr. George stayed at home and wrote "Progress and Pov- 
erty." Witn the profits made during his official term he 
went East, published his book, and with his knowledge of 
working the reporters, soon found himself famous and rich. 
He essayed to extend his "divine mission" to England and 
Australia, but made a sorry failure. His first lecture in 
Melbourne was fairly well attended, but he could never draw 
an audience afterwards. He challenged the Prime Minister 
to a public discussion of the question of Free Trade vs. 
Protection, but was laughed at for his pains, and told that 
there were a dozen or more members of the Labor Unions 
any one of whom was more than a match for him. One of 
them picked up the gauntlet, but he levanted and shook the 
dust of Australia from off his feet. The home of the land ■> 
tax would have none of him. This is free criticism, but it is 
the truth, mildly told, and its publication is justified because 
of the threatened activity of the cult he established. 
Mayor Tom L. Johnson is to be the single taxers' candidate 
for the Presidency. Several of the magazines of the East 
have announced his candidacy and are engaged in writing 
him up. 



Or. Charles W. Decker. 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 
extracting. 



Surprise at the good mercantile lunches served in San 

Francisco will he increased if you try the lunch served by 
Fay & Foster, of the Grand Hotel Cafe, from 11 to 2 daily. 
It cannot be excelled. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



HARMONY THAT DOES NOT MATERIALIZE. 
Most men would like to see the grand old party of Jeffer- 
son and Jackson accomplish the harmony it talks so much 
about, and get together and do something. Under our system 
of government, party rule is a necessity. There must be 
action on the one side and effective criticism on the other, 
with the people looking on as the final arbiters. Then poli- 
tics become an interesting study, and are worth following all 
the time. But when one of the parties refuses to act to- 
gether as a party, hates it supposed friends worse than it 
does its natural enemies, and is united upon no single 
question of policy, what excuse is there for its existence, 
what temptation is there for young men to enter it, and of 
what use can it be to the country? The party of the ins 
may go on making all sorts of mistakes with impunity, 
because it is not confronted with a party in a condition to 
be entrusted with the reins of Government. No thoughtful 
citizen, be he a Republican, a Democrat, or a nondescript, can 
possibly wish to see that condition of things maintained. 
As long as it is, party Government is practically in abey- 
ance. Recently there has been considerable talk about 
Democratic harmony, and some efforts have been put forth 
to bring it about. The only man in the past forty years 
who has proven himself able to lead the Democrats out of 
the woods was called from his retirement, magnificently 
banqueted, and induced to deliver a stirring appeal to his 
party at large for harmony on lines that all ought to be 
able to agree to. He has been twice President, and has noth- 
ing further to seek. Yet he confesses to a passionate desire 
to see the Democracy once more organized and on the road 
to a worthy success. What is the result? We read last 
week of how William Jennings Bryan, twice the defeated 
standard bearer of the party, let loose the vials of his 
scurrility upon the ex-President, whom even his opponents 
respect, and denounced him as a scoundrel in office. Verity, 
that is harmony with a vengeance! Now comes Henry Wat- 
terson, of the Louisville Courier Journal, and says: "Grover 
Cleveland is an ill-tempered, self-willed man, having neither 
the intellectual training nor the moral and political inspira- 
tion to fit him for Democratic fellowship or leadership. . . . 
He is personally an ingrate and a glutton, whose selfishness 
and brutishness render him alien to everything Democratic." 
And he is told in poetical lines to know that "the grave doth 
gape for thee thrice wider than for other men." Great heav- 
ens! Fancy that for harmony! Clearly, there is no hope for 
the Democracy during the present generation. 



The many friends of Mr. Henry Clinton M'elone will learn 
with surprise of his departure on June 28tn on the Hongkong 
Maru for Shanghai, China, where he goes to occupy the re- 
sponsible position of assistant manager of the branch house 
recently established there by Getz Bros. & Co., wholesale 
grocers and commission merchants of San Francisco. Mr. 
Melone is a son of a distinguished family, a native of Cali- 
fornia, a graduate of the State University, speaks Frencn 
and Spanish fluently, and being of fine character will 
prove a valuable acquisition to the coterie of enterprising 
commercial men who discern a broad field for their chosen 
profession in the Flowery Kingdom. 



■ The use of a stick on your husband may do him good. 

But carpets are different. A stick doesn't half clean them. 
The best and cheapest way is to send them to the Spaulding 
Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street. They renovate 
a carpet thoroughly without injuring the fabric. They call 
for and deliver goods. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau have moved to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreets, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



— Southfleld Wellington Coal 
the best for all purposes. 



No headache, no gastritis, follows the use of "Jesse Moore" 

pure whiskey. It does one good. There is none other to equal It. 



To Camera Folks 



The OCTOBER ISSUE of the OVERLAND MONTHLY 
will be a CAMERA NUMBER. It will contain a number 
of articles on the photographic art, and also reproductions 
of many of the finest prints obtainable. We want PACIFIC 
COAST PRINTS of out-door scenes on album or artists' 
paper, and for the best print received suitable for reproduc- 
tion in half-tone we will pay $15; for the next best $10; and 
for the next best $5. We will also reproduce the ten next 
best which are entitled to honorable mention by the judges. 
In judging prints the adaptability of the scene for magazine 
publication will be considered. 

Prints not used will be returned when accompanied by a 
stamped and addressed envelope. 

A special prize of $5 will be paid for the best photograph 
by a boy or girl under 16 years of age. 

All Prints Must be Mounted. 
Any Size Will be Considered. 

Address, 

CAMERA EDITOR OVERLAND MONTHLY, 

320 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



FOR SALE— Thirty-five feet 
of Plate Glass office partitions. 
Apply to J. Gilbert, room 84, 
Murphy Building, 1236 Market 
Street. 



Overland Monthly 

An Illustrated Magazine of the West 

BRET HARTB 
Memorial Number 

The Bret Harte Memorial Number of the OVERLAND 
MONTHLY will be issued in September. 

The issue will be the most interesting and valuable maga- 
zine number ever issued. 

Among the features will appear the following: 

Sketch of the Life of Bret Harte. 

History of the OVERLAND MONTHLY. 

Bret Harte's most famous stories and poems. 

Memorial articles by noted American authors. 

Portraits of early contributors. 

Facsimiles of MSS of "Heathen Chinee."' 

A collection of the best short stories by California authors. 

Tributes by Ina Coolbrith and Joaquin Miller. 

Sketches by the surviving contributors of the first volume 
of the OVERLAND MONTHLY. 

Articles, sketches, and reviews by Mark Twain, Noah 
Brooks, Dr. Jordan, President Wheeler, Prof. Edgar L. Lar- 
kin, and many others. 
ORDER COPIES FROM YOUR NEWSDEALER EARLY. 



July 12, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 




Mary MacLane. who lives in Butte. 

Mary Should be M'ontana. has written a book, and has 
Spanked. called It "The Story of Mary Mar 

Lane.' She had only one object in writ- 
ing it: she has a morbid, disordered, one might say filthy 
mind, and she had to unload its putridity upon somebody. 
Most likely her friends and relatives would not listen to 
her, so she has chosen type and paper as her medium. The 
Germans nave a saying that paper is the most patient thins 
in the world, because it never rebels at what is printed upon 
it. But the pages of Mary MacLane's book must have 
had their patience taxed to the utmost by the sentences 
that string across them — by the morbid, unwholesome, de- 
generate and disgusting things written by this Mary .Mac 
Lane, who is only nineteen years old, and has a mind that 
might belong to one old, not in sin alone, but in viciousness. 

Do not make the mistake of thinking that this book is al- 
luring — that is immoral through suggestiveness. Do not buy 
it thinking that you are to read something like "The Quick 
and the Dead" or Ella Wheeler Wilcox's "Poems of Passion.'- 
It takes cleverness to write such things as those — to write 
such a story as that of Mary MacLane's life takes merely 
a nasty mind and the nerve to record its sensual thoughts. 

She devotes pages to her anatomy, and the workings of it. 
Here is some of it: 

"My sound, sensitive liver rests gently with its thin yellow 
bile in sweet content." 

"My calm, beautiful stomach silently sings, as I walk, a 
song of peace." 

There is more, but I didn't read it and don't think you 
would care to. 

Mary MacLane devotes pages to her sensations in eating 
an olive. Here is about as much as any sensitive reader 
could stand of it: 

"I set my teeth and my tongue upon the olive and bite it. 
It is bitter, salt, delicious. The saliva rushes to meet it, 
and my tongue is a happy tongue. As the morsel of olive 
rests in my mouth and is crunched and squeezed lusciously 
along my cheek, a quick, temporary change takes place in 
my character. * * * The bit of olive slips down my red gul- 
let and goes into my stomach. There it meets with a joyous 
welcome. Gastric juices leap out from the walls and 
swathe It in loving embrace. It lavishes flattery and endear- 
ment galore upon the olive. It laughs in evident delight. 
It feels, that the day it has long waited for has come. The 
philosophy of my stomach is wholly epicurean. Let it 
receive but a tiny bit of olive, and it Will reck not of the 
morrow, hut of the past. It lives voluptuously in the present. 
It is content. It is in paradise. * * * Also this bit slips 
down my red gullet, and again the festive stomach lifts 
up a silent voice in psalms and rejoicing. It is now an 
absolute monarchy with a green olive at its head. The 
kisses of the gastric juices become hot and convulsive and 
ecstatic." 

Does not that come near being disgusting? There is more, 
but it is unquotable, as the above is on the border line of 
being. 

Sometimes she drops the merely filthy and tries to be 
tragic, but succeeds only in writing burlesque. The follow- 
ing is a, sample: 

"In this house where I drag out my accursed, devilish, 
weary existence, upstairs in the bathroom, on the little ledge 
at the top of the wainscoting, there are six tooth-brushes: 
an ordinary, white bone-handled one that is my younger 



brother's; a white iwlstcdhandled one that Is my sister's; 
a flat handled one that Is my older brother's; a celluloid- 
handled one thai is my step-father's; ■ sllver-handli 
that is mine; and another ordinal > one that Is my nm> 
Thr sight of those tooth-brushes day after day. week after 
■reek, and always, is one of the most crushl l.-nlng 

i Ircumstancea In my fools life. 

"Every Friday i wash up the bathroom. Usually I like 
to do this. I like the feeling of the water squeezing a 

my lingers, and always it leaves my nails beautifully neat 
But the obviousness of those six tooth-brushes signifying 
me and the five other members of the family and the aim- 
less emptiness of my existence here — Friday after Frld 
makes my soul weary and my heart sick. * » » I am not 
undergoing an Inquisition, nor am I a convict in solitary 
confinement. But I live in a house with people who effect 
me mostly through their tooth-brushes— and those I should 
like, above all things, to gather up and pitch out the bath- 
room window— and oh, damn them, damn them." 

One of Mary MacLane's chief characteristics is a supreme 
and overwhelming egotism, as instance: 

"I am charmingly original. I am startlingly Bohemian. 
I am quaintly interesting — the while I may be smiling and 
smiling, and a villain. I can talk to a roomful of dull people 
and compel their interest, admiration and astonishment. 
I do this sometimes for my own amusement. As I have said, 
I am a rather plain-featured, insignificant-looking genius, 
but I have a graceful personality. I have a pretty figure. 
I am well set-up. And when I choose to talk in my charm- 
ingly original fashion, embellishing my conversation with 
many quaint lies, I have a certain very noticeable way with 
me, an 'air'." 

I have only one excuse for spoiling so much of a page 
by quoting such stuff: this book has been written and talked 
of a great deal, and the impression has gone out that it is 
suggestively attractive, that it touches on forbidden sub- 
jects in a very plain manner, that it is erotic and excit- 
ing. I want to show that it is merely disgusting and repul- 
sive, and, if possible, keep decent people from buying it — 
for the welfare of the indecent, who are fond of such a mess, 
I don't, to quote Mary MacLane, "care a tupenny damn." 

Herbert M. Stone & Co., Chicago. 

"The Virginians," by Mr. Owen Wis- 
A Cowboy Story. ter, is not, as the title indicates, an 
historical novel or a colonial romance. 
It is a story of early days in the cow-country, and has as 
its principal character a cowboy, known as the Virginian. 
In him Mr. Wister has drawn a great character, life-like 
and vivid. The Virginian is big in body and soul, rough, hon- 
est, a gentleman to the core. He leads the rough cattle- 
puncher's life, but is captured by a New England school- 
teacher and becomes a man of affairs. 

In some respects Mr. Wister's book is admirable. It opens 
auspiciously, and his description of a night in Medicine Bow 
is realistic and strong. It is perhaps a trifle too strong in 
some respects — yet Mr. Wister is describing a phase of life 
which is subject to hardly any other treatment. 

The author becomes deadly dull at times, and rambles 
from page to page without aim or purpose. He devotes 
several pages to a hen that persisted in sitting on potatoes, 
peaches, anything that resembled eggs, and Anally went 
insane. Some writers might have marie this account humor- 
ous, but Mr. Wister has not done so. Instead, he has cum- 
bered his story with a lot of useless verbiage, which is alto- 
gether foreign to the main purpose of the story — besides be- 
ing dull. 

When Mr. Wister sticks to his text, when he remembers 
that his aim in writing is to portray one of the most inter- 
esting phases of American life, to leave a record of a class 
and mode of existence now nearly gone, he is entertaining to 
a marked degree. 

The Macmillan Co., New York. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 




azures 
Wand 

$>\^^GJe oly no wand but Pleasure' 
i^f — Tom Jioort, r^c 




Isn't it about time for Mr. Henry Miller to do a little star- 
ring? San Franciscans like Mr. Miller, and admire his tal- 
ents — but they like them to have full swing. This is the 
fifth week of the Miller-Anglin engagement, but as yet Mr. 
Miller has done nothing startling. In "Trelawney of tiie 
Wells," the opening piece, he had a distinctly obscure part. 
In "The Gay Lord Quex" he had an opportunity to do some 
good work, and he did it — yet Le was overshadowed by Miss 
Anglin's splendid playing of a role that was greater than 
his. This week, "The Adventure of the Lady Ursula" is 
on. and again Miss Anglin is the star. Mr. Miller scintillates, 
of course, and brilliantly — yet most of the applause is for 
the beautiful Lady Ursula, who truly earns it. It may be 
Mr. Miller's unselfishness that prompts all this — or it may 
be that he is to have his chance during the last few weeks, 
and that the season will end in a M'illeresque blaze of glory. 
We know his work in "The Only Way," and are assured 
from experience that he will be the commanding figure 
in it. Then we are promised "The Lady of Lyons." which Mr. 
Miller has not yet produced here, and in which he will. 
I predict, make a great success — and so will Miss Anglin. 

Daintiness and a bright and merry wit are the chief 
characteristics of The Adventure of the Lady Ursula, by 
Mt. Anthony Hope. The dialogue in it is especially good— 
ot the quick, snappy variety, rejoinders following half-fin- 
ished sentences, as in his books. There is an engaging plot, 
too. The efforts of Lady Ursula to break Sir George Syl- 
vester's resolution to allow no woman in his house, tLe 
threatened duel between Sir George and Lady Ursula's 
brother, brought about by her madcap prank, her masquerade 
in a man's attire, by which means she strives to avert 
the threatened duel, and the duel she herself conies neat- 
fighting, all go to make up a charming play. Of course 
it would he better to end it at the third act, and leave the 
hearers to infer that Sir George and Lady Ursula termin- 
ated their affair in marriage; still, the last act is entertain- 
ing, and has one or two scenes in it that are thrilling, 
even though they are unnecessary to the happy ending 
or the coherence of the play. 

Mr. Hope has built up a very charming character in Lady 
Ursula, and Miss Anglin succeeds thoroughly in carrying out 
the author's conception. She is piquant, merry, bubbling 
over with mischief — yet sufficiently serious and strenuous 
where needs be. Nothing could be more winning than her 
mingled terror, bravery, and witchery in the third act. The 
duel scene, in which she and Sir George each take a choice 
of the two pistols, one of them loaded, and prepare to fight 
across the table, is positively thrilling, thanks mostly to 
Miss Anglin's superb acting. 

Powdered hair and a black-patched face always add to the 
interest Mr. Miller arouses — especially When supplemented 
by such good acting as he does as Sir George Sylvester, the 
courtly, gentlemanly recluse, who is at last drawn from his 
hermitage by the fair Ursula. He does not do any distinct- 
ive work — he has been seen in other roles which he handled 
in the same manner. This is not Mr. Miller's fault, but the 
fault of the part he plays. It simply calls for straightfor- 
ward work, which Mr. Miller performs with grace, ease, 
charm, and intelligence. But here's hoping for something 
that will make him break through his repression — something 
that will permit bim to add vigor, force, dash, and fire to 
his consummate art. 

A very human Bishop, so human that he actually con- 
sents to deceive in a good cause, is Reverend Mr. Bllmboe — 



and the part is played in an absolutely perfect manner by 
Mr. Charles Walcott. In appearance, manner, poise, expres- 
sion, he is the dignified old churchman. Mrs. Whiffen, too, 
plays an old part, that of Mrs. Fenton. It is hard to say 
whether the young or the old actresses are the more charm- 
ing. Such veterans as Mrs. Whiffen and Mrs. Gilbert run 
the younger ones a hard race. 

Miss Grace Elliston plays Dorothy Fenton. The part calls 
for spirit, grace and intelligence, all of which M'iss Elliston 
furnishes. Miss Elliston has a distinct individuality, which 
counts for a great deal. 

Mr. William Courtleigh, who always does good work, is 
up to his usual standard as the Earl of Hassenden, and_JVlr. 
Walter Allen as Mr. Castleton shows the trained actor in 
every word and movement. Mr. Arthur Elliott plays Mr. 
Dent, the quarrelsome duellist, in a thoroughly good manner, 
and Mr. Fred Thorne does an excellent piece of character 
work as Quilton, the old servant. 
• * • 

Some people have loads of fun at tno Orpheum, and to 
them their periodical visits there are almost as necessary 
as food and cirink. "Orpheum fiends" are a perfect mine of 
information regarding every entertainer who has appeared 
there since the house was established, and can draw a dozen 
comparisons out of every turn. 

Tuesday night I saw two exceptions, a Mr. and Mrs. Jap. 
who, in trying to become Americanized, were sitting eagerly, 
but not amused, through the performance, trying their level 
best to understand it, but compelled to take most of it for 
granted. They seemed to appreciate the singing, the tumb- 
lers chained them in rapt interest, and they enjoyed the bio- 
graph pictures immensely. But the monologues and sketches 
puzzled them. Their limited knowledge of English made 
the jokes a senseless jumble to them — as, indeed, some of 
them were to those who understood English. 

In direct contrast was a woman somewhere in the center 
of the house who had a laugh that led all the rest. I don't 
think it was all appreciation, either. One can tell when 
a monologist is about to make his point — and when Mr. 
James Thornton was delivering his little matrimonial lec- 
ture I caught her gay peals ringing out time and again, but 
before he was nearly to his point. But think of the fun she- 
had ! 

If Mr. Thornton would end his turn with his lecture the 
audience would be saved much suffering. It is exceptionally 
good, and exceptionally well delivered — but those songs! 
Mr. Thornton himself must have written the last one, "The 
Bridge of Sighs." Nobody but a man with nerve enough to 
write it would have the nerve to sing it. 

"Billie's First Love" is a one-act playlette, done by Mr. 
Walter D. Green, Valerie Bergere and Rose Stuart. Al- 
though it is not thrillingly good, it has the merit of being 
different from the ordinary run of sketches, and is more 
than moderately interesting. Miss Bergere, who plays 
Josephine Paul, is a queer mixture of good and bad. She has 
a voice that seems to be under no control — musical and 
pleasing at times, and then again harsh and strident. She 
has more than the average vaudevillian's ability, though. 
Mr. Green, as Billy Paul, does very well — and Miss Stuart 
as Ozette does very badly. W. J. W. 



"Pousse Cafe'" still continues at Fischer's Theatre. 

* * • 

"Zaza" continues at the Alcazar next week. It will be 
followed by "As You Like It," with Miss Florence Roberts 
as Rosalind and Mr. White Whittlesey as Orlando. 

* * • 

Mr. George C. Boniface and Bertha Walzinger, comedians, 
will appear at the Orpheum next week in their sketch. 
"The Woman Who Hesitates is Won." The Eretto family. 
European acrobats, will make their first appearance in thlB 
city. Carson and Willard do a German comedy turn, and 



J ly 12. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



Iho I.nw,. Hnchis trio will present a sketch one 

»l Daughter ' Th.- holaoren will !>>■ the Ru 

Mr Jam.s .1. Morton. V«l npnny. the 

1US, and the blograph. 

• • • 

Monday night Mr. Osrar Wtlde'g comedy, Tin* [in 
portance of Being Karnest." win be presented bj the Milter- 
Anglln company. MY. II V. Ksmonrt's "The Wilder! 
will follow. 

• • • 

Mondny i-vining the Tivoii win revive "The Serenade," 
with Frances Graham. Annie Myers, Aimee Lei' 

rrls llartman. Joseph Fogarty, Arthur Cunning- 
ham, Harry Cashman. and Thomas Guise among those in tiie 
On Monday. July L'sth. is the opening night of the 
grand opera season. Reservations for the season may be 
made from July 1 1th to July lftth. The sale of tickets for 
tne first week opens one week in advance. 



THE TRUSTS NOT EQUALING EXPECTATIONS. 
The New York Journal, a Weighty authority in the busi- 
ness world, sounds something very like a death knell to 
the great trusts. They are failing to realize expectations, 
and are being beaten by the competition of less unwieldy 
concerns. It expresses the firm belief that the folly of the 
trusts "in imagining that they can hold the enterprise of 
this greatest of all nations in unjust restraint is approach- 
ing its day of reckoning. The inevitable is in sight to men 
of sound vision." This is solacing to those of us who feared 
that the great trusts had come to stay, and were destined 
to swallow us all up. The best of it is that the figures jus- 
tify the Journal's prognostications. The smaller and inde- 
pendent enterprises launched during the last seventeen 
months have a larger capitalization than that of all the trusts 
organized in the past twelve years. All the trusts so far 
formed have a nominal capital of $4,500,000,000, while the 
increase of large and small independent corporations in 
the last seventeen months is stated by this authority to be 
$5,000,000,000. This shows that, imposing as the expansion 
of the trusts may seem, that of the competitive concerns is 
immeasurably greater. Minor millionaires and substantial 
business men have obviously reached the conclusion that 
conservatively financed and well managed individual enter- 
prises have nothing to fear from the water-logged and 
official-bled trusts. The new independent concerns are re- 
ported to be everywhere busy, and cutting into the business 
of the trusts at a remarkable rate. The figures show this 
to be so. The United States Steel began with a control of 
eighty per cent of the national output, but now only claims 
67 on steel and 45 on pig iron; while the sugar trust has 
reduced its claim of control from 90 to 50 per cent. All the 
trusts are falling far behind their early promises of net 
earnings, and their expected economies are not being real- 
ized, so that in several notable instances the combinations 
are resolving themselves into their original elements. 



The special musical features in the forthcoming produc- 
tion of "As You Like It" at the Alcazar will be in charge 
of Dr. H. J. Stewart. 



In Substitute Feeding 

for infants, physicians agree that cowi's milk is the basis for 
all beginnings. What is required, then, is the best possible 
milk product. Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is 
ideal, pure, sterile, and guarded against contamination. 



If you wish your new suit to always look new, send 

it regularly to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Works, 127 
Stockton street, where it will he cleaned, freshened and 
pressed. They also clean gloves, cravats, laces, curtains, 
and all such articles. Their work cannot be excelled, and 
promptness is always their rule. 



Fischer's Theatre 

'■..i ft, *,. Thlnki ri.o « hota I 

POUSSE CAFE 

ANTHONY A«D CLEOPATRA AND A ROYAL FAMILY. 
Mttat trippl* blll«T»r«MnofiMy slat*. A immli. a r<-n for 
every brwlb roil take The remarkable eaet: K..u>. Dili, itr-menl 
HUke. Dermaan, Re ftorreet, Irober, Bvana, Vldol and mir enohanl- 
iiiir rintriin. Ineludlns rJopeand Braeraon. lame popular priced • 



Tivoii Opera house. MR " ■«.'& ?.?£.£.„. 

Evenings At 8 sharp! Mnllnce Saturday at 2 sharp! 
To-olBht »nd Sunday night, lmatol THE IDOL'S EYE. 
Monday, July i Ith. The Great Hit. 

THE SERENADE 

The Grand Opera Season Hoe ins Monday, July 38th. Heats for the 
aeii-*»r.ii can be reserved from July I Uh. till Saturday, July I9th. luclus- 
Ive. 

Popular prices— 25, 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



0_ _ L _ , , __ San Francisco's Greatest MubIo Hall 
rpneU m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and 



Powell streets. 



Week commencing Sunday Matinee, July 13. 

GEORGE BONDAGE dR. It BFRTHA WALZIGER;The 
Eretto Family; C-rson and WilJard: The Lowe Hughes Trio: The 
Russell Hrothers; James J. Morton: Tfce ItoHseaue : The Bfograph and 
Iferi »uek of VALERIE BERGERE& COMPANY. 

Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday. 

Reserved seats. 25c; Balcony lOo: opera ohairs and box seats. 50o. 



A|____,_ T~L.~-.4- — «. BHLiaco A Thall, Managers. 
icazar I neatre. pnoneMa.n 2 M 

Beginning- Monday, July lllh. Positively Sixth and Last Week. 

MISS FLORENCE ROBERTS 

Supported by White Whittlesey, and the Surpassing Alcazar Stook 
Company, in David Belasco's Great Play 

ZAZA 

Last matinee Saturday, July 19th. Seats selling for all performances 

up to and including Sunday, July 2l)lh. 

Monday, July 21— Big Production of "As You Like It." Florence 

Robert-*' First Appearance as Rosalind. 

Prices— Evenings. 15c, 25c, 35c, 50e & 75c. Matinees, 15e, 25c. 35o 50c. 

Sale of seats opens July Hth. ^ 

G~J..«~k!_ T*U« — J-—— UOTTLOB. MABX & i O 
OlUmDia I neatre. lessees ana Manager*. 

Week Beginning Monday. July 14th. Matinees Wednesday and 
Saturday. Charles Frohman presents 

HENRY MILLER 

and a special company in the London New York and San Francisco 
success, 

THE IMPORTANCE' OF BEING EARNEST 

Ocnr Wilde's Brilliant Comedy. 
July 21— "The Wilderness." 



After the Theatre 



Whiskey that suits, that does you good, aids your diges- 
tion and appetite, Is the pure stuff— "Jesse Moore" rye or bourbon. 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand Is society's gathering place after 
the theatre is over. 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of JAMES HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HASTY, Deceased. 

No'ice i* hereby given by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM, Admin- 
istrator of the Estate of JAMES HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HAHTY, 
Deaeased, to the creditors of and all persons having claims againbt the 
said D- c a«ed, to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers, within four 
months after the first publication of this notice, to (he said Administrator, 
at Room 79, Chronicle Building, the same beii.g his place for the transac- 
tion of the business of the said estate In the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. JOHN FARNHAM. 

Administrator of the Estate of 
JAMES HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HASTY, Deceased 

Dated a* San Francisco, June 21, 1902. 
FRANK McGOWAN 

Attorney for Administrator. 

Rooms 75, 79 and 80 Chronicle Building. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year and the 
transaction of such obht-r husiness as may be brought before the meeting 
will be held at the office of ihe company, No. 2^S Sieuart Street, wan Fran- 
cisco, on MONDAY, the 1th day of August, lyt2, at II o'clock A, M, 

AUGUSTUS TAYLOR, Secretary. 

SCIENTIFIC MANIPULATION 

Mrs. A. Bilsbrougit, the sucee a sful specialist, particularly in chronic 
and nervous disorders. Ladies and children only. Home treatments by 
arrangement. Office Menesini Building, 231 Post Street, Room 12, Houra 
9 to 1*. 1 to 5,30. Telephone James 2606, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



The PHonetic Will 



By Robert H. Jones. 

That Roy Fetherngill was an eccentric man no one resid- 
ing in the neighborhood of his residence could deny. Being 
a chemist, however, and an ardent worker in that profes- 
sion, the purpose of many of his strange doings was seldom 
questioned, and was merely ascribed to his interest in sci- 
ence. 

Fetherngill was the possessor of a most thoroughly equip- 
ped laboratory, which he kept secretly guarded and in which 
a great part of his time was spent. He was in possession 
of ample means to gratify his most elaborate whim, and aside 
from the time and money which he spent in his laboratory, 
he reserved sufficient of both for the proper devotion to 
his home and family, as well as to the society in which 
he was a central figure. He never allowed a member of 
his family to cross the threshold of the apartment which he 
held so sacred. 

One morning Mr. Fetherngill cast a feeling of depression 
over the family circle at the breakfast table by opening 
a conversation on the subject of death. 

Although he had ever since his marriage twenty-eight years 
previous, persistently resisted the entreaties of his Chris- 
tian wife to join the church, he now talked of the necessity 
of preparing for the time when all earthly accounts must be 
settled. 

The conversation sounded at first as though the seed 
she had persistently sown and re-sewn had by some favor- 
able occasion at last begun to take root and grow, but Mr. 
Fetherngill's ideas upon the subject were entirely of a secu- 
lar nature. He reasoned that every man must die — this 
from a scientific standpoint. He had read of one man who 
did not die and he did not believe that. 

He left the table with the remark that he was going to 
prepare for death, and repaired to the laboratory leaving 
his wife and three daughters in a flurry of muddled thoughts. 

A telephone order brought to the house the skilful and 
famous Peter Vandenbroek, whose great works of sculpture 
had brought him fame and recognition from remote parts 
of the country. 

The sculptor was admitted to conference with Fetherngill 
in his laboratory. On the following day he returned with 
several boxes of paraphernalia and instruments of his art. 

For the ensuing month Fetherngill and Vandenbroek 
were closeted in the laboratory, but to what purpose Mrs. 
Fetherngill and her inquisitive daughters could not even 
surmise, and a thought of entering the scientist's sanctum 
none of them dared to entertain. As society and the public- 
had long since ceased to give second thought to Mr. Fethern- 
gill's peculiar movements, nothing more than a passing curi- 
osity was excited by the sculptor's daily visits to the Fethern- 
gill mansion, though M"rs. Fetherngill, possessing that 
womanly peculiarity, had heralded her husband's strange 
action among the circle of friends with whom she was in- 
timate, and on the following day Fetherngill received by 
mail several tracts and sermons entitled "Repent ye. for 
the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand," and others of a like na- 
ture, together with a very impressive poem, "Pray ere it be 
too late"; all of which he consigned to the fire with remarks 
which threw bis religious wife into despair. 

At luncheon one day the sculptor, whose presence had 
graced that noon-day meal for the previous month, was 
absent. Mr. Fetherngill said that he had finished his work. 

Mrs. Fetherngill, whose curiosity had been restrained until 
now it was at the bursting pressure, asked for the first 
time what the sculptor had been doing. She received the 
reply that Vandenbroek had been preparing her husband's 
will. 

Why a sculptor, instead of a lawyer, should have been em 



ployed to draw up a will Mrs. Fetherngill could not imagine, 
and her curiosity was now more than doubly aroused, and 
in spite of a conference held with her daughters, she could 
not discover a clew which might throw light upon her hus- 
band's strange intentions. 

Mrs. Fetnerngill was in anything but a pleasant mood 
as she sat in the parlor reviewing her husband's recent and 
strange remarks about deatn and wills. Glancing out of the 
window, a scene confronted her which sent her with a loud 
scream into a violent fit of hysterics. Her daughters rushed 
to her assistance, and were equally horrified upon seeing 
two men bearing into the house a coffin from the wagon of an 
undertaking establishment in the city. The bell rang, and 
Mr. Fetherngill personally received the man and conducted 
them with the casket to his laboratory. 

The event most naturally created quite an excitement in 
that quiet household, and Mr. Fetherngill was the only mem- 
ber of the family who enjoyed the evening meal with com- 
posure. 

"Why did you bring that coffin into the house?" asked 
his wife, her voice controlled almost mechanically rather 
than by her own will. "There is no telling when I might 
need it." replied her husband calmly. "But if you ebjee* 
f<- its being here I will have it removed to-morrow." 

True to his word, on the following day Mr. Fetherngill 
had the coffin removed, but in a decidedly different manner 
than that in which it had entered the house. 

On the day before, the casket was bandied carelessly and 
easily by two men. but now it was carried carefully by four 
men. who staggered under its weight. This peculiarity was 
not overlooked by Mrs. Fetherngill and her daughters. 

Their curiosity, rather than being satisfied, was more 
deeply aroused when they were informed by Mr. Fetherngill 
in answer to their questions regarding the contents of the 
casket, that it contained nothing but his will. It was beyond 
them to conceive of a will drawn up by a sculptor and de- 
posited in a coffin. 

The casket was delivered to the office of Frank M. Adler. 
Mr. Fetherngill's attorney and bosom friend; there deposited 
in his vaults for safe keeping, and to be opened after his 
death. 

This peculiar circumstance had no effect upon hurrying 
Mr. Fetherngill's departure from this mundane sphere, and 
the strange incident had quite been forgotten when Mr. 
Fetherngill was killed by an explosion in his laboratory, his 
features being most horribly mutilated. 

After the funeral of his beloved friend and client. Mr. Ad- 
ler returned to his office, and looking through a bundle of 
large official envelopes selected one upon which was written: 

FRANK M. ADLER, 
To be opened after the death of 

ROY FETHERNGILL. 
Adler opened the envelope and read as follows: 

Frank M. Adler, Attorney — Sir: Not later than a week af 
ter my death, in the presence of my wife and those of my 
children who at the time of my death may be living, your- 
self, two competent stenographers and four such reputable 
citizens as you may select for witnesses, place the casket 
left with you on December 1. 189 — in a vertical position 
and remove the lid by unfastening the screws, then follow 
the directions that you will find in the casket. 

ROY FETHERNGILL. 

Upon the following afternoon Mr. Adler's office was the 
scent, cf a most unparalleled experience. 

Seated about tic- room were Mrs. Fetherngill and her 
daughters, dressed in tin- mourners' garb, and in accordance 
with the deceased husband's request, tour gentlemen, mu- 
tual friends of both Adler and the late Mr. Fetherngill. 



July 12. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



mplptcd Ihc assembly, 
utly remoTed Ui* caakel from itio 
mull, ami as directed, plared it in an upright position !><■ 
mbl) . 
iiil of ihf caakel «as alowly removed, and then 
(ranted them Mr Fetherngill in all the likeness ol I. is (ormi t 
s»'lf. i lural, though motionless, in his hand was 

an envelope addressed to the attorney. Tin' lawyer opened 
it and na<l : 

"Adler: Under my left aim yon will Bnd a string. Pull it 
anil carefullj watch and cloaelj observe the result R, l". " 

Though dumbfounded with sm h an unparalleled exper- 
lence, Adler, knowing these to l»- the requests of his ;:"• 
friend, obeyed. 

A deathly silence fell upon the audience, broken only 
by the rumbling of miniature machinery in operation, issu- 
ing from the casket. 

Every eye was intently riveted upon the strange likeness 
of the man recently departed. As they gazed upon the tig. 
ure its eyes seemed to gain expression and its features as- 
sumed the animation of the living: its arms slowly raised 
and extended. The figure took the position of an orator, ami 
in a clear voice, unmistakably that of the deceased husband 
and father of the mourners in whose presence it stood. 
spoke to the silent, expectant and grief-stricken audience. 

"Hear ye!" the image said. "In the presence of God as 
my witness, I, Roy Fetherngill, of rational mind, do make 
the following disposition of my property, to be in effect 
immediately after my death: 

"To my wife I do bequeath all of my real property in this 
the city of San Francisco, together with all improvements 
thereon, and all furniture therein, except the furniture and 
fixtures in my laboratory. 

"All moneys which I may have on aeposit in the First 
National Bank at the time of my death and upon this declara- 
tion are made payable to the order of my wife, and she shall 
issue checks immediately upon this hearing to the follow- 
ing persons and in the following amounts: 

"To each of my children living at the time of this declara- 
tion, twenty thousand dollars. 

"To each stenographer and wi.ness to this declaration 
one thousand dollars. 

"To my attorney and friend, Frank M. Adler, two thousand 
five hundred dollars. 

"To each and every servant in the family employ one hun- 
dred dollars. 

"To my friend, Ambrose Harris. I do bequeath all stock 
and shares held by me in the Development Syndicate. 

"All other property, both real and personal, which I have 
not herebefore made disposition of, shall be sold and the 
proceeds be devoted to the erection and maintainance of a 
school of art and science, and I request that Peter Vanden 
tioek be appointed to the chair of sculpture at a salary 
of twelve thousand dollars a year. 

"And I earnestly charge all present, as sponsors, that 
they will harmoniously work to the fulfillment of these 
my last requests. 

"This in the city of San Francisco, State of California, 
on the thirteenth day of November, 189 — ." 

At the conclusion of the oration an explosion occurred 
within the casket, converting what was a most beautiful 
piece of the sculptor's art to a shapeless mass of debris. 

In removing what almost seemed the mortal remains of his 
client, Mr. Adler discovered a phonograph, but an examina- 
tion of the cylinder showed that the chemist had arranged 
a knife which followed the diamond point of the instrument 
and had permanently erased all impressions on its surface. 
"Fetherngill was a man," icmarked Adler, "who never did 
repeat anything which he said." 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

[(BlMOWMl I" Shi. tier* At JdhlMOB 

TAILOR 

Phelsn Bldg. Tel. Main 5387 San Franelsco.Cal. 

Hotel Bartholdi, 

Tha very center of the city, convenient to all the 
big stores and all places of amusement. Euro- 
pean plan, $1 a day and upwards. 

23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square Park.) 
Finest cafe In this city. 



Milton Roblee. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST.,nearTremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 

A High Class Kxclufeive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate ratts- 
Accesslbly and Delightfully located. 



W. Johnson Quinn, Proprietor. 




RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C, 

The Hotel '• Par Excellence" 



of tbe National Capital. First-class in all appointments. 
O G. Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Every delicatessen 

Domestic and Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



'I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in. 



—Dr. Shbadt. 274 Lexington avenue. New York 
L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 
Send for Pamphlet. 418 Sacramento St 



Worthington Ames 



flember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker in stocks, bonds and municipal securities. 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street. Tel. Main 1381. 



Gray Bros. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 



Hayward Bide., California and Montgomery 

streets. San Francisco. 

205 New High Street, Los Angeles 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 190i 




Mr. Frank McComas, the artist, has his studio at Mont n i 
in the old Spanish house occupied by the historic Spanish 
lady to whom General Sherman was supposed to be engaged 
in his youth. The legend runs that General Sherman 
planted a rose bush and promised the young girl he would 
return and claim her as a brille when it blossomed. The 
Dush bore blossoms many seasons, and the General did not 
return. It grew to be a splendid thing of beauty and tne 
girl was still a spinster. Now she is an old woman, wrin- 
kled with care. She lives there, refusing to alter or sell 
anything in the place. The tourists from the East have 
heard of the famous rose bush, and they flock there to pho- 
tograph it. They weary Mr. McComas excessively, and so 
when they came to ask him to point out the Sherman rose 
bush, he selected an old scraggly affair, and he tak 
demoniac satisfaction in knowing that they are taking home 
the photograph of the wrong bush. 

» • a 

Mr. "Jo" Redding came back from New York the other 
day to be a peace-maker in the Bohemian Club. He was to 
sire the midsummer jinks, but he has given up the idea. 
He is a particular friend of Mr. Ned Hamilton, and he asked 
him to go back into the club and read a paper at the jinks. 
for Mr. Hamilton has great histrionic as well as literary 
ability. Mr. Hamilton, together with MY. Williams, the pub- 
lisher, and Mr. Robert, the managing editor, and all the 
members of the Examiner staff except Mr. Aiken, withdrew 
their names from the club at the time President McKinley 
was assassinated, and were instrumental in founding "The 
Family." Mr. Redding's efforts were not successful, for « tiile 
Mr. Hanii.ton agreed to appear at the jinks bis confreres, 
Mr. Williams and Mr. Robert, objected, and the idea has 
been abondoned. 

* * * 

There's a man in San Francisco who makes his living 
in a novel way. He is a jag recuperator; in plain language 
he braces up fashionable drunks. His patrons number 
many prominent men, and his "studio" is in the Palace 
Hotel. His work consists in putting a new head on a man 
who has temporarily misplaced his own. Men whom we all 
know come to the studio after they have been on artistic 
sprees, and they arrive in various dilapidated conditions. 
The jag artist massages them, bathes them and works over 
them until they are able to take up life again with the zest 
of a new-born babe. Lesser lights go to a hammam to 
sober up after an evening of riotous pleasure. Men of money 
seek the jag artist. 

• • « 

Two men passed away during the week whose names 
are linked with the stirring times in the early history of 
San Francisco. George Wallace, who died aged 70, at 
Pasadena, of Bright's disease, was thirty years ago one of 
the leading lawyers at the local bar. During the great Bo- 
nanza deal in the latter seventies, Mr. Wallace was the con- 
fidential adviser of tne late James C. Flood, the financier 
of the quartette who retired eventually from the market 
with millions and the rank of kings in the mining world. 
Mr. Wallace was full of reminiscences in connection with 
the rise and fall of the Con. -Virginia and California stock 
under the skilled manipulation of a master-hand. ]!•■ was 
a learned man, of gentle birth, and in his palmy days a 
liberal patron of the arts. George C. Hickox, far years 
auditor of the California Northwestern Railroad, whose 
funeral took place on Monday last, had an eventful career. 
As a boy he sailed in a whaler to the Northern Pacific, land- 



ing eventually in San Francisco, where he entered the bank- 
ing business with one of the pioneer houses. He subse- 
quently branched out himself under the firm name of Hickox 
& Spear, with offices on the northwest corner of Montgom- 
ery and Pine streets. At one time he was worth millions, 
but reverses came, and the firm passed out of existence. 
As a member of the "big board," Mr. Hickox subsequently 
retrieved a portion of his fortune. He was one of the foun- 
ders of the Bohemian Club, a kindly, charitable soul by 
nature, and died possessed of more real friends to mourn 
his loss than many a wealthier man can boast. 

* * * 

The American methods of training the young idea how to 
shoot are mild indeed compared with those adopted in 
merrie England. Passengers crossing the Oakland ferry 
with an eye to the natural surroundings on the trip are 
prone to enquire the whys and wherefores of three parallel 
lines encircling the steep southern flank of Goat Island. One 
above the otner these paths have been indented into this 
rocky and hitherto inaccessible section of the island. This 
is where punishment drill takes place for the youth in train- 
ing on the Pensecola, securely moored on the leeward shore. 
When any of these future sailors of the American navy 
disobey the rules against smoking, orinking or using foul 
language, out they go for a solitary march on the punish- 
ment path, where for hours they can commune in silence 
over the fault which has brought them in touch with dis- 
cipline. In the other great navies of the world a rope's end 
in the hands of a sturdy boatswain's mate is meted out for 
similar offenses on training ships for the boys of this class. 
Going a step higher, on the Brittania herself, where the 
naval cadets are broken into harness and where King Ed- 
ward's sons took what was going like the rest of the boys 
on board, the commanding officer is empowered for serious 
offenses, such as use of obsene language or grave insubor- 
dination, to order physical punishment, the cadet being 
strapped down ami thrashed in the presence of the execu- 
tive and medical officers of the ship. What a howl would 
be raised here if such a punishment were inflicted; and 
yet there is nothing to prove that man or officer suffer in 
their subsequent careers before or abaft the mast by a taste 
of discipline which taught them a never to be forgotten 
lesson in manners. 

• • V 

M'r. John Parrott can do other things than breed blooded 
horses and write musical scores. There are ever so many 
little Parrotts in San Mateo who call Mr. Parrott papa. Mr. 
Parrotfs progeny will keep the name perpetuated if no 
other member of the family manages to do it. The little 
Parrotts had a great Fourth of July, but the end of it was 
spoiled by a too officious match. Parrott padre had invested 
a good-sized sum in fireworks for his children, and in the 



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July 12, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



16 



i on the lawn prepared t" 
rocket*, rein* it ran ami wheal*. Whether ■ carolec 
vant or ono of th<- petite 1'iirroiis precipitated the 
truptio no one Is prepared to Mate Hut all at once, before 
a rocket had hit the air, the whole boa of fireworks went up 
In smoke. A walling arose from Fourteen Juvenile ilironts, 
ami the San Mateo town children who had gathered In the 
street to peep over the I'arroit feme joined In the dismayed 

chore 

■ • • 

Mr. t'haunrey Winslow has a new title. His friends are 
calling him "Lord Quex." It is not Ms moral resemblance 
to the gay nobleman with whom we lately became ac- 
quainted that has won Mr. Winslow the name — for Sallie 
Stetson's husband Is a very sober and virtuous man — but 
his likeness to MY. Henry Miller's make-up for the part. 
Mr. Miller as Lord Quex was the dead image of Mr. Chaun- 
cey Winslow in every-day life — gray hair, eye-glasses, com- 
plexion, figure, carriage, manner. 

• • • 

Mrs. Veronica Baird a year or so ago had a coachman 
who had been in her service for years, but one day he an- 
nounced to his employer that he had a brilliant position of- 
fered him. So he wrote her a long letter regretting his de- 
parture, and sending by a messenger a present for each 
member of her family. The name of his employer was un- 
revealed. but he was supposed to be an Eastern capitalist. 
A month later she received a bill for the gifts, which 
had been charged to her. Soon after she learned that her 
former coachman's employer was Colonel Isaac Trumbo. 

* * * 

Judge Lawlor not only has a double in Mr. Belasco, the 
playwright, but one of his most intimate friends, Mr. Henry 
Whiteley, the broker, is as much like him as one of the 
two Dromios resembled the other. Not long ago M'r. White- 
ley was at one of the clubs, and was cordially greeted by 
Mr. Dwight Porter, the banker. Mr. Whiteley did not like 
to ask him his name, because he seemed to know him very 
well. Mr. Whiteley accepted the treat of Mr. Porter, and 
was amazed to hear himself called "Judge." Then he asked: 
"Who do you think I am?" 

"Judge Lawlor," was the reply. 

Then Mr. Whitely realized that his likeness to Judge Law- 
lor had gained him a cigar. 



NO ARTISTS' LEAGUE EXHIBIT. 
Some tvw> weeks ago the News Letter announced the ex- 
tended exhibition of local artists under the auspices of the 
Artists' League. As the idea was a good one in view of tne 
large number of clever artists here, we regret to see that 
the project has been abandoned for the present. The sub- 
scribers, who had agreed to select pictures before the 
exhibition to the amount of their subscription, have had 
their money returned to them, and those who had charge 
of the exhibit have returned to Chicago. It is to be hoped 
that the next venture in this line will be put through, as 
such a stimulus to art cannot but be beneficial to San 
Francisco. 



Fountain Pens. 

We are selling agents for the Waterman Ideal and the 
Swan Fountain Pens, and sole agents for the Marshall, the 
best $1 pen in the world. Sanborn, Vail & Co., 741 Market 
street. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy, 
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If you knew that "Jesse Moore" Whisky was the best and 

purest on earth you'd have no other. It is the best, but we can- 
not prove It except you try H. Try it. 



The "CLAN HACKENZIE" 
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Leader in Glasgow Exhibition 19' 1 Supplied to the largest shipping; 
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G. R. MACKENZIE, 

GLASGOW LONDON LIVERPOOL 

FORBES BROS., AGENTS, 307 SANSOME STREET 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




"Hear the Crier"* "hO/at the devil art Mou * 
"One that will play the devil , j/r, wtthyou * 




own \~ner 



At large he got and shot and shot 

And in a manner racy 
He bathed the shore with rich, red gore, 

While all were tracing Tracy. 

They traced him and they chased him and 

The chasers chased the chasey, 
But when they traced his traceless trace 

They found no trace of Tracy. 

Tis not so hard to trace the trace 

Where Tracy traced the chasey, 
But those who joined the Tracy chase 

Were often chased by Tracy. 

The "mystery" of that human head found in North Ber- 
keley Canyon, has been cleared up, somewhat satisfactorily, 
but not entirely so. Harry Grigg, a student at the Hahne- 
mann Medical College, claims it as his own. and says that 
ne had been using the canyon as a dissecting room, and that 
the human head was only part of the ghastly morsels whicn 
he had hidden in the bushes of the vicinity. If that is the 
case, some one ought to tell Grigg a few things about de- 
cency, a trick even a medical student ought to know. The 
human body is regarded with entirely too slight reverence 
by the many young fellows who intend to become practic- 
ing physicians. Even a dissecting room cadaver is too good 
to be hacked like so much carrion in the publicity of a side 
hill. So much for the corpse. I will say nothing of the 
feelings of North Berkeley residents who are likely to stum- 
ble across pickled arms, legs and finger bones in almost 
any vacant lot in their part of the country. 

And our buildings shall keep pace with our civilization. 
It took us several years to knock up a rickety postofflee on 
a Seventh-street peat bog, but I'll wager more than I'll 
bet on the prize fight that the Jeffries-Fitzsimmons building 
to be erected for the "great battle" will arise like Aladdin's 
palace, and at less than half the expense. The Board of Su- 
pervisors have granted the San Francisco Athletic Club 
permission to erect a building at the corner of Fourteenth 
and Valencia streets. The fight is to come off on the even- 
ing of July 25th, and the building will be in beautiful un- 
sanitary, un-fire-proof shape at that date. The speed with 
which it will arrive will be worthy a better cause, but nobody 
can expect such a building to be safe. Well, if it burns down 
or tumbles down the night of the fight, it will not wipe out 
the most respected element in this and other cities, which is 
a solace not to be overlooked in case of disaster. 

There has been trouble in one of the Chinese theatres 
again. I don't know why it should be, but it is a fact that 
female parts in Chinese play-houses are always taken by 
men — in fact, such is the law in China. So when Lee Fook, 
who was to appear in a theatre in San Francisco's China- 
town, was headlined as a real lady, the Mongolians filed in 
by the thousands, to the threatened financial ruin of the 
rival theatre. So the managers of the deserted play-house 
kidnapped Lee Fook, and held her for ransom — until the fact 
was disclosed that Lee Fook was a fake, a mere man. Now 
the erstwhile prosperous Thespian temple is doing a big 
business, almond eyes slant evilly toward the other place, 
and Lee Fook wanders abroad, a disgraced actor, a Pariah, 
a maverick. Such is the penalty of not being a lady. 



July 12, 1902. 

San Francisco has a free public library. I know it, be- 
cause I have been there. And because I have been there 1 
aiso know that it is about the worst managed institution 
of the kind that exists. Go up there and try to find a book, 
and you will agree with me. You will find Carlyle's "Sartor 
Resartus" under the head of poetry, and "Gulliver's Trav- 
els" in the biographical department. Dumas' works will 
probably be found catalogued as history. Worse than this, 
the catalogues are woefully incomplete and behind the 
times. They have three sorts of catalogues at this misman- 
aged free public library. There are the revolving catalogues, 
which sound like threshing machines when you turn them. 
There are some bound catalogues, which are mysteries of 
arrangement. Then there are catalogues made up of monthly 
bulletins. To find the number and class of a book that 
has come in within a year, you must go through these latter 
catalogues, and if you do not know in what month the book 
was issued you can imagine the hunt you will have — and 
then you will find that the book is out. To get the numbers 
of old books in order to draw them you must hunt through 
all the catalogues in the library. Books that are listed 
on the revolving catalogues are not in the bound ones, 
and vice versa. Added to ail this, there are no printed rules 
posted up for the guidance of new members, and some of 
the attendants are decidedly impudent. I hear that many 
people are giving up their cards and going to the other li- 
braries which charge a monthly fee but give decent treat- 
ment. The public library is a star example of municipal 
management as it is bound to be. 

This is no joke. I have been told, unofficially, that a negro 
sehoolhouse is about to be erected on Russian Hill. I am a 
lover of the negro, and as such I believe that the black man 
should be neither burned nor sent to the United States 
Senate, but with my abolitionist heredity I have learned to 
respect the negro — at a distance. A school-house of any 
color, red. white or yellow, on Russian Hill, would be an 
outrage and a sacrilege, hut a negro school-house would be 
worse. It would be damnable. Russian Hill is one of the 
finest landmarks on the continent. It has been spared the 
casino and slums of Telegraph Hill, and it stands to-day like 
a brown-clad giant overlooking the Gate. Set on this a San 
Francisco school-building, with its characteristic jig-saw 
architecture, overrun this height with wooly-headed pic- 
aninnies — shade of Sievenson, arise and prevent it! 

I hope that all the stories told of Dr. Lawlor, manager 
ol the Home for the Feeble M'inded at Glen Ellen, are not 
true. It would be too much of a disgrace to the State to 
have them proven in full. Not since Mrs. Reeves Atkin- 
son conducted her notorious "Sanitarium" on Sutter street 
has such a ghastly list of atrocities been reported. Governor 
Gage, with characteristic promptitude, has ordered an in- 
vestigation, which is going on at the present writing. 
I am convinced, from what I have heard, that b'ood-curd- 
ling atrocities have been committed upon these mental weak- 
lings. No punishment will fit Lawlor's case if he is found 
guilty, but he should be given all the law allows — and d 
a little more were administered everybody would be willing 
to wink at the overdose. 

That's right, boys! Morris Maeterlinck says that fist, 
fights are brutalizing and that gentlemen should settle their 
differences in mortal combat. Little Moxie Albert and 
Georgie Vowinkle of Tehama street are readers of the Ger- 
man symbolist, so after quarreling over the smiles of Flos- 
sie Smith, they came together with pocket knives last 
Saturday night. Such is the beneficial influence of modern 
German philosophy. Let us keep on with the good work. 
Let us teach our growing sons to abandon the barbarous 
practice of pugilism, and if they must fight do it according 
to Maeterlinck with pocket knives, dull hatchets, or other 
weapons of refinement. 



July 12. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



Iconoclast Wields the Hatchet 



While tipping at mt Dewey Monument he takes a side 
crack at the head of his opponent "Truth" — whose head, 
he says, is as bald as his logic. 



Editor News Letter- IVnr Sir: Week before last you 

SO kind ns 1o publish out the lioacl "Why a Dewey 

Monument?" a communication from my pen. The following 

sreek I am flattered by an answer to my humble prates! 

from one "Truth." a gentleman of undoubted respectability, 

as his writing bore silent witness. My great surprise was 
that lie didn't sign himself "Pro Bono Publico." for he bean 
all the earmarks of the plump, Pickwickian old gentleman 
who writes "indignant protests" outside of banking hours 
and contribu:es indefinitely to the sleepiness of nations. I 
can testify to the excellence of the letter of "Truth." 1 
had been suffering from acute insomnia for sis weeks. 
Drugs, medicines, nursing, were all alike of no avail. Six 
of the most famous physicians in the State came into con- 
sultation and agreed that if I did not sleep inside of six 
hours I would become a raving maniac. After having des- 
paired of all other remedies, I read "Truth's" letter in last 
week's "New Letter." The effect was instantaneous. At 
the second sentence I fell into a light, refreshing doze. 
the first I Lad enjoyed for many a night. By the time I 
had reached the second paragraph my sleep was deep, my 
snores musical. I have been asleep day and night for the 
past week, and was only aroused to pen this letter by means 
of a stream of ice-water poured down my neck by a bell-boy 
who had been to the Philippines. 

"Truth crushed to earth will rise again." I hope so, but 
I fear that the present reincarnation of that ancient lady 
will succumb to the squash and float away in a sea of fat. 

But to resume the question of a Dewey monument. It 
was not my intention to spatter my ink across the spotless 
tunic of Manila's hero. It was not Admiral Dewey's fault 
that he became confused with a rat poison and an inex- 
pensive brand of cigar. But why increase his embarrass- 
ment by chipping the name of that cigar and that rat 
poison across the bosom of the imperishable marble? May- 
be the nation wants to show Dewey that they really intend 
to immortalize him in marble and concrete, and are going 
to finish his monuments before he dies, so that he can see 
for himself that he is really immortal. Perhaps that's it. 

Otherwise it were an act of rare indelicacy to rear a 
man's tomb, at public expense, before he is dead. 

I am glad that this plump gentleman, "Truth," has written 
to you, my dear Mr. Editor. I Lave learned that ping-pong 
is not comparable with patriotism as a means of national 
enjoyment; also that Truth is English; also that Dewey 
and Schmitz are not running in the same class of heroes; 
and finally that the Spanish fleet was not composed of kit- 
chen utensils, but of veritable warships. 

Also I have learned that Truth is an ass, and that his bray 
does not disturb my slumbers. 

But forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of 
Heaviness. ICONOCLAST. 



Smartest Train of All. 
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tri-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
es' inc winter journey across the continent. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

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coal. Sold by the Tesla Coal Co., 1 0th and Channel. 'Phone, 
South 95. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 




With the exception of a drop 
Local Stocks and Bonds, in Oceanic Steamship Co.'s 
stock to $7 during the week, 
there was nothing of an exciting character in the local 
Stock and Bond Exchange since the Board opened after 
the holidays. Oceanic rallied subsequently to $10 under 
feeble support of buyers. The street is not inclined to 
dabble in these shares for the present, awaiting develop- 
ments, considerable credence being given to the report 
that the control will before long pass into the hands of the 
Santa Fe Railroad Company, which for some time past 
has been on the lookout for a trans-Pacific connection with 
its lines. California Fruit Packers is firm. The new price 
list just issued is thought by some to be low, and by others 
high, but in the main it gives general satisfaction. The pros- 
pect for business is good, as fruit, cans and sugar are 
cheaper than last year. It is thought that owing to the diffi- 
culty in procuring labor there will be a smaller pack than 
in former years, which will aid in cleaning up the market. 
There is again some talk about an Eastern combine gob- 
bling up all the fruit canneries and the wineries in Califor- 
nia, and in spite of all denials, which come as a matter 
of course, it is safe to say that if the Eastern financiers 
take up the matter in earnest, they will not have much 
difficulty in attaining their ends. Sugar stocks rule firm 
on good reports from the Island plantations. There is also 
a disposition in this direction to consolidate the Island com- 
panies, which while undoubtedly a safe proposition for the 
small concerns, is not altogether as desirable for the 
wealthier companies, which could only come into the com- 
bine at a disadvantage to themselves. Raws are still 
dull and weak, with no likelihood of any change in the situa- 
tion until after the Cuban crop is sold out. It is certain, 
however, that any demand for stocks listed in the local 
board would speedily enhance values, which are now inor- 
dinately low, considering the intrinsic values of the prop- 
erties they represent. The Independent Gas and Power 
Company began to supply gas from its mains on July 
1st, and the system is now in full operation, with a capacity 
of 2,000,000 cubic feet per day. The price charged all over 
the district south of Market, through which run its 40 miles 
oi mains, is 75 cents per thousand, and business is increas- 
ing all the time. The old company is still hammering away 
under a 50 cent rate in an effort to wipe out the little 
Equitable Company, wherever the latter enters into compe- 
tition. The rate for the city having been raised from 98 
cents to $1.2o per thousand feet for gas. it is said that this 
system will shortly be dropped entirely for electricity. 
Water stock is steady, with light business. Bonds hold 
firm under a good demand. 

State Mineralogist Aubury has 
Latest Publication of just issued a bulletin on the sa- 
Mining Bureau. line deposits of the State, which 

is about the most interesting 
subject he could have taken up in the mining line on 
behalf of the public. Until this volume appeared but little 
was known on the subject of a definite or reliable charac- 
ter. Individual reports from time to time appeared, deal- 
ing with some particular deposit of borax or nitre, avail- 
able for the few personally concerned, but here it ended. 
According to general information California borax was the 
best in the world, but the same story applied to nearly 
everything produced within the State from pumpkins up. 
Now the public can find out all about it by inquiring at the 



State* Mining Bureau. All classes of saline deposits are 
covered in this interesting report, together with maps 
of the localities where each variety is found, with field 
notes, analysis, and all necessary details. We can heartily 
commend this publication to all desirous of full and reliable 
information on a topic of vital importance to the com- 
mercial prominence of the State. 

The Comstock market is drag- 
The Pine-St. Market. ging along in a kind of haphazard 

way. Business is very dull and 
prices are weak, with no particular movement in any 
special line of stocks. The reports from the north-end 
mines continues good, and values ought to be higher, but 
lacking local manipulation the attraction of a speculator is 
lacking to bring in the investing public. 

Unfavorable comment continues on 
A Good Thing what is known as the Rayo Mining and 
to Leave Alone. Development Company promotion 
scheme, which Harper's Magazine has 
been advertising at considerable length. The News Letter 
devoted a column to an adverse criticism of this outrageous 
catch-penny in its issue of April 5th last, in the hope that 
the warning would reach some people in time to save them 
from loss. We can hardly believe that the Harper's publi- 
cations would willingly lend themselves to the flotation of 
an enterprise of this kind by disseminating a series of abso- 
lute falsehoods, and the same applies to men whose names 
are mentioned in the advertisement as sponsors of such a 
scheme. To reiterate, the falsehoods in the prospectus include 
the following statements: Kern County is not the truest min- 
ing district in the United States; Yellow Aster does not pro- 
duce $300,000 monthly and has not $25,000,000 in sight. 
There are other statements which will not bear the light of 
investigation, and on the whole the old maxim false in one, 
false in all, applies to the advertisement, which should 
in itself put people on their guard. 

The announcement that the Tonopah 

The Working of Mining Company is about to start mill- 

Tonopah Ores. ing is on a par with the majority of the 

so-called mining news which finds its 
way into the press by the present system of garbled re- 
ports, contradiction following assertions of fact with start- 
ling regularity. In the first place, the company has not yet 
decided what system it will be best to adopt, looking toward 
the economical working of the ores. It may be that smelting 
will be considered the most practical method, and if so. 
a way may yet be found to connect the district with the 
smelters at Eureka, where everything in the way of appro- 
priate fluxing is on hand. This would appear to be the 
best plan if the difficulties of transportation can be tided 
over at the cost of moving the ores elsewhere. In the 
meantime it can be said authoritatively that the manage- 
ment of this company has not definitely decided upon any 
plan of action. 

The following dividends have 
Dividends Now Payable, been declared payable on the 
15th inst. : Contra Costa Water, 
42 cents; Oakland Gas, Light and Heat, 25 cents; Port 
Costa Water Company, 30 cents. The Pacific Coast Com- 
pany declared a quarterly dividend of 1 per cent on com- 
mon stock, 1% per cent on first preferred, and 1 per cent 
on second preferred stock, payable August 1st. The Italian- 
American Bank of the city has declared a dividend of $2.50 
per share on its capital stock, and interest on deposits at 
the rate of 3 6-10 per cent per annum. In Oakland the fol- 
lowing banks have declared semi-annual dividends on all 
savings deposits at the rate of 3>4 per cent per annum, 
payable July 1st: Union Savings Bank, Central Bank, Oak- 
land Bank of Savings, and Farmers and Merchants' Savings 
Bank. 



July t2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



1t 



The linnni It I Bl I the Mil" r 

Hiberma Bank in 

Statement. appeared, showing lis condition al lin- 
ing to thU statenn-nt the total u>s.is were J 
. by a list of BOlld in\ .stiii. nt> m real 
securities, of this amount (28,362,457.61 
surr.l by loans upon real estate, 122,088,423.43 In i 

bonds, ami (6,473,982.17 m miscellaneous bonds. 
Other values are represented by real estate holdings In 
different portions of the State. In cash in the hank vaults 
Is the sum of (1,195,866.04. The sum total of. deposits la 
(62406,883.46. The reserve fund now amounts to (8 
045.03. The statement shows a continuance of the pros- 
perity which has at all times Followed the operations of 
this old-time and highly popular Institution. A semi-annual 
dividend at the rate of ?,'« per rent has just been declared 
on all deposits, payable on and after July 1st. 

The Bank of E. Lauer & Sons has just been licensed to 
do business at Alturas. Modoc county, by the Bank Commis- 
sioners. It is a private concern with a paid-up capital of 
$100,000, run by the Lauer family. The officers are B. 
Lauer, president; Marx Lauer, vice-president; Benjamin 
Lauer. treasurer and cashier, with I. J. Lauer and A. Lauer 
directors. 



.i o. Ham_, Pm . » 

Tm..*. RtCKAKD, I.I. - 
VI. el-rr-l.trul \ 



Koriuprlr "I 
I'.rke A I wy Co. 



I v I M la. :...l VI. • 

President, n 
( Fnllon F.I>.Viriili.l»fllr 



Rubber goods are of little value unless you get the best 
— such, for instance, as those manufactured and sold by the 
Goodyear Rubber Company, 573 to 579 Market street, San 
Francisco. To anglers the Goodyear rubber boots are 
universally known as perfection. They are light, strong 
and durab.e, and, more than all, cool and sanitary. Half of 
the pleasure of fishing is lost if one wears boots that are 
hot. damp, and chafe and swell the feet. There is no trou- 
ble of this kind with the Goodyear Rubber Co.'s goods. The 
highest standard is maintained in everything they manufac- 
ture. 



OBITUARY. 

A death that has saddened society more than any 
that has occurred for a long time was that of Miss Ruby 
Sessions, who died on July 1st, after an operation for ap- 
pendicitis. She had been ill but a week, and two days before 
her death she was taken to the Lane Hospital, where i^r. 
,-tillman performed the operation. At first there were hopes 
of her recovery, but a relapse occurred, and quick pneumonia 
attacking her, death quickly followed. 

Ruby Sessions was born in Carson, Nevada, and was the 
only daughter of David R. Sessions, claims adjuster of the 
Southern Pacific Company. Most of her life was spent in 
San Francisco, and she was educated here. She was ex- 
tremely popular in society, her winning ways endearing her 
to everybody. She was twenty years and ten months of 
age at the time of her death. 



New Things in Cameras. 

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of fresh goods at correct prices. Also printing and develop- 
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Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal ptaoe of business, Sun Franoisco. California. Lo- 
cation of wo ks — Storey County, Nevada, 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the26lh day of June, 1902, an asses-ment (No 1 3) of five (6) cents per share 
was levied upon the capital stock of the coi poratlon, payable immediately 
in Ui.ited Stales gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of ihe company, 
room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. 

Any Block upon which this wsessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 31st DAY OF JULY, 1902. 
will be deemed delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction : and 
unless payment is made before, will be sold on Thursday, the 21st day 
of August, 1902. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Dlrecors, 

CHAS. E, ELLIOTT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Franciico 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Mexican Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works — -torey County, Nevada. 

Notice Is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
' on the 11th day of June, 1902, an assessment (No. 71) of ten (10) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street» San Franoisco, 
Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 16TH DAY OF JULY. 1902, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 1st day of 
August. 1902, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 
Cal. ■ __ 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Chollar Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the 20th day of June, 1902, an assessment, (No. 59) of five (5) cents 
p Q r share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, paya- 
ble immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 79 Nevada Block, No- 309 Montgomery street, 
San Franoisco, Cal. 
31 Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 

24th DAY OF JULY, 1902, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction : and unless pay- 
ment Is made before, will be sold on THUKSDAY, the 14th day of August, 
1902. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary 
Office — Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 3i9 Montgomery street San Fran- 

clscoi Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
Works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice it hereby given that, at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 17th day of June, 19' 2 an assessment (No. 86) of five (5) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, payable 
immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, room 35, third floor. Mills Building, corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 22nd DAY OF JULY. 1902, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the I2th day of 
August, 1902, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS. JR.. Secretary. 

Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills Buildiog, cor. Bush and Montgomery 
streets. San Franoisco, Cal- 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment . No. 126 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied May 26, 1902 

Delinquent in office -July 1, 1902 

Day of sale of delinquent stock July 21, 1902 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 14, Nevada Blook. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



BANKING. 
London and San Francisco Bank, united 

421 OAJLIFORNIA STREET. 
HEAD OFFICE— 55 Old Broad street. London. 

Capital Authorized, 12,500.000. Capital Paid Up, Jl.400,000. 

Directors— Henry Gosohen, Chairman, London; Christian de Guigne. 

San Francisco; Charles Hemery, London; John L. Howard, San Fran- 

olsoo; Bendix Koppel, London: Greville Honaley Palmer, London: Norman 

D. Rldeout, San Franclsoo: Arthur Scrivener, r>ondon. 

Agents In New York, Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. 

BRANCHES: Portland, Oregon: Tacoma. Wash., Seattle. Wash. 

Letters of oredlt Issued available for travelers and the purohase of mer- 
chandise in any olty of the world. Deal In foreign and domestic ezoha n ge 
Acoounts of oountry banks reoelved. Terms on application. 



The Made Land of San Francisco 



A. L. Black, Cashier 



W. Mackintosh. Manager 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which la amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. 88,000,000. Reserve Fund, 12,000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over 170,000,000- 

Hon* Geo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker, General Manager. 

J. H. Plummet, Asst. General Manager. 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St-, E. C, 9. Cameron Alexander. Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. Alex. Laird and Wm- Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES. 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon District 
Dawson, White Horse; British Columbia: Atlln, Cranbrook, Ferule 
Greenwood, Kamloops, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Sandon, 
Vancouver, Victoria. In the United States — New York, N. Y. San Fian- 
olsoo, Cal- Seattle, Wash- Portland, Ore- Skagway, Alaska- 
Bankers in London — The Bank of Scotland; Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers In New York — The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents in Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans- 
— The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franolsoo Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Katun. Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sansohb and Suttee 8ts. 

Subscribed Capital tE.GOO.OOO Pald-Up Capital. 12.000,000 

Reserve Fund. $1,000,000 

OTEAn OFFICE — 10 Tb read needle street, London, E. O. 

AGENTS : New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie. 17 
Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

8IO. GREENEBAUM. Manager. 
R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 



The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of San ho me and Pine Sts., San Franolsoo 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pikbob Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Oowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL $600,000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. $147,000. 

DIRECTORS— James K. WitBon. Wm. J Dutton.Wm. Pierce Johnson. Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Plerue, O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York-Hanover National Bank. Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Mhawmut Bank ; Philadel- 
phia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St, Louie — The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Brown. 
Brown, Shipley & Co. Parle— Morgan, Harjes & Co. Denver— National 
Bank of Commerce- Johannesburg — Robinson South African Bank'g Co. 
Ltd. 

Germania 1 rust Company of San Francisco 

42 Moittgokkby St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, tl. 000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, t450,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Acoounts of Individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid ON trust DEPOSITS and SAVINGS. Invehtments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers — F. Kronenberg. President: W. A. Frederick, vice-President : H. 
Brunner, Cashier; J. O. Rued, Trust officer. 

Board of Auditors— A. G. Wieland. Geo. W. Bauer and ,T. n. Rued. 

Board of Director* — K. Kronenberg, Kred A. Kuhle, F ed Woerner. W. A. 
Frederick, F. C. Slebe. John Kapp, Walter M. Wille l and Herman L. E. 
M yer. E. A. Denicke. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansohb Stb. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars. London, E. O. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up tl.500,000 

Subscribed 3.000.000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, mattes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 
IQN. 8TE1NHAET. P. N. LILTENTHAL. Managers. 



Secur'ty Savings Bank 



222 Montgomerv St Mil Is Building 

NTEKBMT PAID ON DEPOSITS. I.OANS MADE. 

DIRECTORS. 



Wil'lam \iv>rd 
William Rahcoelc 
Aadiu < Irani 



H. L. Abbot. Jr. 
L. F. Monteagle 



H.H, Hewlett 
E. J. MoCulcldi 
R. II. Pease 



By J. M. Scanland. 

Hundreds of men and carts are employed daily in "filling 
in" the waste places of this city, and in reclaiming what is 
known as "made land." The district to the south of the 
city, locally known as "Butcliertown, " comprises about 
three-fourths of a mile of territory which has been reclaimed 
from the Bay by the system of "filling in" or "filling up." 
A large area of this section is still marshy, unnavigable for 
boats, and not yet open for street traffic. The process of 
filling continues at a rapid rate, for property in that section 
has become more valuable within the past year. All kinds 
of city refuse is hauled to this waste land — and among these 
cart-loads of tin cans, boxes, ash heaps, and everything that 
one throws away in a city, may be seen numbers of scaven- 
gers, each with a long prod, turning over the rubbish, hop- 
ing to find a gold watch or a roll of money in a tin can or a 
paper-box. Similar work is also going on at Central and 
China Basins, the shore line of North Beach, and the made 
land near the Presidio. The property owners of this north- 
ern section get their filling material from Jones and Larkin 
streets, where a number of lots are being graded, also some 
sections of the stieets in that vicinity. 

About fifteen years ago the shore line of the city was ex- 
tended further outward by a new survey, going to the limits 
of the seawall line, and including some territory partly 
under water. The line makes a curve, extending from the 
Presidio to Hunter's Point, the southern boundary line. 
The curvature between the San Jose Military Reservation 
and the Presidio is about 2,000 feet; that between Stockton 
and Jackson streets is about the same in extent, and that 
between Jackson and Battery streets is about 2,200 feet. 
The general curvature of outward extension averages about 
500 feet. 

In order to have a permanent water front, and to keep 
the city from sliding into the bay at some points, notwith- 
standing that it gains land at others, a seawall was decided 
upon, and is being built along this curved line. Work has 
been stopped for the present, however, but the Harbor Com- 
missioners are hoping for more appropriations. The two 
and a-half miles constructed, making ten sections, extend 
from Market street to Taylor street. About six miles remain 
to be completed. The wall costs about $500,000 a mile. As 
an evidence of how rapidly land is made on the city front, 
the bay naturally fills to the depth of one foot a year, and 
sometimes to a greater depth, according to the sediment 
brought down by the rivers, and to some extent by the quan- 
tity of the sewerage of the city, which is thrown into the 
bay. The Harbor Commissioners keep the bay front dredged 
to a depth of forty-one feet, low tide, so as to admit the deep- 
est draught steamers with ease. 

Thus it will be seen that a large part of San Francisco 
is made land, reclaimed from the bay, but the seawall will 
henceforth curb its boundaries in the direction of the bay. 

Forty-niners remember when Sansome street was the 
water front, and nearly all the houses below that line were 
built on piles. The water was not deep, but the land was 
partly covered by water, and rubbish was carried along the 
streets and emptied into the bay to make the foundations 
solid. Wharves were extended into deep water, and the 
builders began marching into the bay. Cross-streets were 
built on piles, and the spaces between these wharves were 
filled up, and the piling and filling was extended along the 
wharves, thus enclosing the blocks into made land. The first 
wharf was built by Captain Folsom, and extended into the 
bay about 400 feet, beginning at near the present site of 
the Bank of California. A lagoon extended from the bay 
to the corner of Jackson and Montgomery streets, and into 
it a stream ran down a ravine now known as Sacramento 
street. On the southwest corner of what is now Sacramento 
and Montgomery streets was, in aboriginal days, an Indian 



July 12, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



temescaJ. or hot bath, from which the Indians would run 
and plunge Into the lagoon. 

By this filling In process the wharves were gradually ex- 
I, anfl rocks were quarried from Ttlcgrapli Hill and 
tarted Into the bay. BtTMtt w. n- graded, and thi 
dumped Into the water district, ami thus the city front was 
led. The increased value of lands consequent upon 
th>- tide of gold-eeekers rushing in. poshed work forward. 
and at the same time led to land-jumping, lawsuits and 
numerous street-fights.. 

ll the Mine time the city was being reclaimed from 
the bay in the North Beach district. Harry M'eiggs. the DOti 1 
financier and absconding speculator in city warrants, had 
bought a large tract of land fronting the bay, and built bis 
historic "long wharf." He excavated a road to the business 
part of the city round the base of Telegraph Hill, and hoped 
to draw the business part of the growing city in that direc- 
tion. But the route was too circuitous, as there was a 
cemetery in the district bounded by Powell, Stockton, Lom- 
bard and Chestnut streets. However, Meig^s secured the 
rassage of an ordinance removing the dead to the site of 
the present New City Hall. When the streets now known 
as Stockton and Powell were graded, the dirt was thrown 
into the bay at North Beach, and helped to reclaim some 
of the land for Meiggs. It availed him little, however, for 
his speculations failed, and he -fled to South America, under 
the charge of forging contractors' city warrants to pay debts 
Incurred in reclaiming these lands. He was a pioneer in 
city extension work, and perhaps deserved a better fate. 

Incidentally, it may be mentioned that several blocks of 
the city south of Market street is made land, which is 
known to the present generation only by tradition. From 
Third to Ninth streets the ground was marshy in a number 
cf places, and a creek extended from Mission Bay, near the 
line of the present Third street to the Mission of Dolores. 

At about the corner of the present Seventh street was a 
lagoon which extended to the corner of what is now Market 
street. There were two or three other creeks in that dis- 
trict, but nothing remains to show even their boundary 
linef. 

It will be seen that the city has done a great deal of filling, 
but this made land is now as solid as any other portion of 
the city. The immense structures that rest upon these once 
marshy spots are evidences of that fact. Some of the largest 
buildings constructed on Sansome and Battery streets within 
the past few years, rest upon 20-foot piles. The new ferry 
building, an immense and heavy structure, at the water's 
edge and on the newest of the made land, is also a witness 
of its solidity. 



THE NEW ELECTRIC-LIGHTED OVERLAND LIMITED 

is a revelation in the art of car building. Every want seems 
to have been foreseen. Each seat is provided with an ad- 
justable electric reading lamp so that one can read either 
sitting or reclining. The highest taste has been shown in 
the choice of soft tones In the decoration of the walls and 
ceilings, with which the carpets and upholstery match per- 
fectly. The traveling branch of the Book-Lovers Library in 
the composite car will prove a great convenience, as mem- 
bers can take a book onto the train, exchange it there, and 
take another with them when they leave. Telephone ser- 
vice by special wire is provided up to the hour of depart- 
ure at the terminals, a special operator being in attendance 
in the observation car at the rear of the train. The train 
leaves San Francisco at 10:00 a. m., daily, and reaches Chi- 
cago in three days. Secure descriptive booklet at Southern 
Pacific Information Bureau. 613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you'll save at least one-third on your fuel bill, 
'fhone Tesla Coal Co., South 95. and your order will receive 
prompt attention. 

A cafe, club or hotel which serves "Jesse Moore" Whisky Is 

handing to their trade the finest goods that can be had. A cafe 
is known by the goods It sells. 



BANKING. 

Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank 



SAN FRANCISCO 



('■pllnl, BUTpltM, *n<l I' iiclivldcd 
Profits, July 31, 1901, 



$9,561,290.28. 



t>i hi.kv Evans. Acting President; HomkkS, Kiso, Manager- II Walk- 
worth Cashier; F.L. I.ipman. Asst. Cahhikk: Eg. I.. Mm.i.kh, A««t. < ashler. 

Branches— Now York; Suit Lake. Utah; Portland. Or 

Correspondents throughout the World. General Hanking business trsn- 
paoled. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA .hTkEKT > K 

Deposits Jan. 1, 1902... '30,026 452 Reserve Fund 1130.908 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 480.204 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY. Vloe-Prestdent 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Frenjery, CO 

0. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman. Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
landsln the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Fxpress, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge 1b made for pass hook or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to S p. m. and Saturday evening*- . for receipt of de- 
posits onle 6:30 to ft o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. S2.000.000. 

Surplus, 81,000,000. 

Undivided Proflts, July 1, 1902 H3.027.997.S8 

WILLIAM ALVORD President I THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vlce-PreH't I. F. MOTM.TON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary I SAM H. DANIELS As B 't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.: the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore — The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev. — Agency of The Bank of California. London — MeBBrs 
N. M. Rothschild A Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothsoblld Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Disconto GeBellschaft. China, Japan, and Eat t Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit issued, available in all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus *2 JI7.3S7.5S 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1 IHKl 00D.0O 

DeposltB June 30. 1902 31.698 792 56 

BOARD OP DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vlce-l-resldent 
John Lloyd: Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 
H. Horstmann. Itn. Stelnhart, H. B. Russ, Emll Rohte, N Ohlandt, and 

1. N. Walter. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Sec- 
retary, George Tourny: Assistant Secretary, A, H. Muller; General Attor- 
ney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Up Capital.... 8300,000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

Geobob A. Stoby, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobbon, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal. James M. 
McDonald, Charles Holbrook: 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital.. 812,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... 8280. 000 
Paid-in-Capital 2.000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Pubpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office— S. W. Cor. California and Battery Streets, Han Franolsoo 

W«. Cobbin. General Manager 

Grocker-Woolw/orth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
OoBNBB MABKBT. MONTGOMEBY AND POST Ht«. 

Pald-up-Oapltal 81,000 000 

Wm. H. Obookbb, President Geo. W. Klink. Cashier 

O. E. Gbbbn, Vice-President W. Gbkqg. Jr.. Assistant C'ashlei 

Director.— W, W. Crocker. E. B Pond. Georg-e Crocker. O. E. Green. G.W . 

Henry Kline. T. Soott ». w. Scott 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



T5he Automobile 



The Automobile Club of California, 415 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Main 934. Officers: Mrs. F. A. 
Hyde, President; Dr. F. J. Tillman, Vice-President; Mr. A. 
C. Aiken, Secretary; Mr. Byron Jackson, Treasurer 

* * * 

Automobile Club of San Jose. — Mr. E. T. Sterling, Presi- 
dent; Mr. B. D. Merchant, Secretary; General Executive 
Committee; Messrs. Frank Coykendall. Harry Bercovieh, 
Charles Chrisman, E. T. Sterling, and B. D. Merchant. 

* * * 

Touring Committee: Mr. E. P. Bruguiere, chairman; Mr. 
H. Courtney Ford, and Mr. George H. 'Whitney. 

V * * 

The Automobile Club of California is arranging for a 
club run to Hotel Mateo, San Mateo, in about two weeks. 
Arrangements are being made for a very enjoyable outing, 
and doubtless quite a number of machines will line up at 
the start. The San Jose Club will be invited, and as usual 
will be well represented. The outings of the automobile 
clubs are becoming very popular, and are making many 
friends for the automobile. 

* * * 

The recent automobile ordinance passed by the Marin 
County Board of Supervisors is not taken seriously by au- 
toneers. The ordinance is a curiosity in law making, and 
provides that an auto driver must stop his machine within 
300 feet of an approaching team. In passing through a 
town, this requirement might cause a driver to remain 
stationary hours at a time, as one team after another would 
approach. While the Supervisors probably acted with 
the best intentions it would appear that a little legal ad- 
vice might have saved them from perpetrating such a fake 
as this ordinance must prove to be. Auto drivers will, of 
course, pay no attention to the 300 foot requirements, al- 
though they will be as careful as possible in passing teams 
on country roads. 

* * * 

It is said that Miss Sarah G. Drum of this city was the 
first lady on the Pacific Coast to own and operate her own 
automobile. If this department is in error on this point, 
a correction will be gladly received. 

* * • 

It will not be very long before San Francisco can boast 
of an automobile show. Why not this coming winter? 

* * • 

Sir Henry Thompson, the eminent British medical author- 
ity, has just published a book, in which he appears as an 
enthusiastic advocate of this form of exercise. He declares 
that the easy jolting which occurs when an automobile is 
driven at a fair speed over the highway conduces to a heal- 
thy agitation; it acts on the liver in much the same way 
as horseback exercise acts. He says the exhilaration which 
accompanies driving is particularly helpful to people who are 



We quote the following from the Cycle and Automo- 
bile Trade Journal for June 1st, 1902, page 24: 

"THE 'WHITE' STEAM MACHINE" 

The unbroken record of the 'White' steam vehicles scoring 100 per 
'cent, in every endurance run in which they have entered, is % f itself 
"the hichest possible recommendation, and the added lau-els they 
''have won as a result of the fuel and water consumption reco'da 
|^made in the last two runs, and the strictly nnn-stop runs ma.lo 
^place llm-we vehicles in a clu*a by themselves. There is little wonder 
"that these vehicles are the talk of the trade." 

WHite Sewing Machine Co. 

300 POST STREET, San Francisco, Cal. 

C. A. HAWKINS, GENERAL AGENT. 



somewhat enervated. Furthermore, the action of the air 
on the face, and the continual inspiration of fresh air, tend 
to promote sleep, and is an excellent aid in the prevention 
of insomnia. 

» « * 

As every horse in San Francisco has become convinces 
long since that he is not in danger of annihilation from 
every passing automobile, it is respectfully suggested that 



Vhe locomobile 



» Company 

of tr;e pacific; 

1622-1628 HAKhtT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

Take pleasure in an- y«\ i* A J. I *l 

KEStiSM?" Gasoline. Automobiles 

and represent the followinir well-known manufacturers: 
Wlnton Motor Carriage Company. Cleveland. Ohio; United States Long. 
Distance Automobile Company, New York, N. Y.i Buffalo Automobile and 
Auto-Bi. Company, Buffalo. N. Y.; Smith & Mabley. American Agents 
"Panhard— The Peuget." 

Full nit<t Complete Line of Parte and Accessories, Automobile Leather 
Clothing for Ladies and Gentlemen, Lamps, French Horn*, etc. 

"LOCOMOBILES" FOR RENT Telephone Sodtm 697 



OLDSMOBILE 




RETAIL WAREROOMS: 

Western Automobile Co. 
201-203 Larkin St.. San Francisco 



GASOLINE 
AUTOMOBILE 

Climbs 20 per 

cent, grades 
riaximum Speed 
20 miles 

Orders taken now for 
August Delivery 

PRICE $750, 

f. O. B. SAN F/tAVC SCO 
PACiFIC COAbT AGENTS: 

The Manufacturers' Co. 
26 Fremont St., San Francisco. 



MOTORlTTE 



TRIE.D 
TRAJE. 



Malcom C. 
Whyte Co. 

Pacific Coast 
Agents 

71 McAllister St 

SAN FRANCISCO 




SUNSET AUTOMOBILE CO. 

1811 MARKET STREET, S. P., CAL. 



July 12. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



the Park restrictions regarding motor carriages arc obso- 
lete. Certainly no valid reason exists for the continuation 
of the antiquated restrictions that now attend kutoffloblling 
In the Park. Let us progreaa, Messrs. Park Comml 
ers. 

• • • 

Mr. A. K. Hooker Ridley has received the agency of the 
Electric Vehicle Company of New York and Hartford, I 
and expects a first shipment of electric automobiles before 
nd of August. 

• • • 

An automobile, appropriately named, after .lules Verne's 
character. "Passe-Partout," left Hyde Park Corner, London, 
in April, for a journey around the world. The car is fitted 
up In the style of a Pullman sleeper, and its adventurous 
owners propose to live in it during the trip. The route 
will be from Paris to St. Petersburg, thence through Asiatic 
Russia to China, to Honolulu, New Orleans, Canada, New 
York, and home via Liverpool. London's innumerable motor- 
ists have a new weekly journal, The Car, to the first number 
of which Gilbert Parker, author of The Right of Way, has 
contributed. Mr. Parker "thinks that in ten years the roll 
of the omnibus and the far-off rumbling tread of the heavy 
horse will be things of the past in London. 

• • • 
Automobile Proverbs. 

A miss is better than a mile-runaway. Goggles and caps 
don't make an automobilist. Be sure you're right and go 
ahead, but be sure you're sure first. He who hits and runs 
away should go to jail another day. A clutch in hand is worth 
a whole machine in the ditch. Better to have raced and 
lost than never to have raced at all. A fool and his auto 
should soon be parted. Folly at the helm makes the police- 
man's watch go fast. What doth it profit a man to gain a 
wagonload of trophies when he breaks his neck once? 
Any excuse for an accident is better than none; but no acci- 
dent is better still. — Automobile Topics. 




For That Tired Feeling and Headache 

demand Bromo Kola. For sale 

everywhere. 



HOW DO THEY DO 

Thu«e new lightning speed 



IT 



AUTOMOBILES 



IliRt we build to order? The swift, cany motion in (ruined 
by superiority in details of manufacture Hint It would pay 
you to Investigate. We Pell automobiles on 



MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS 



California Automobile Co., 

30J CALIFORNIA ST., 

Factory, 346 McAllister SI. Phone South U6 



College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic. Full college 
course of studies. Modern building; steam heated. 
Unsurpassed beauty and healthfulness. Address, 

Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael, Cal. 

BEST'S ART SCHOOL 

Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, and Illustrating 
Life classes. $3.00 per month. 

927 flARKET STREET, 

DR. H. d. STEWART 

Teacher of Vocal Music, Piano, Organ Harmony 
and Composition. 

Special course for singers deBirlng church 
positions. 

STUDIO: 1105 BUSH STREET 



HEMS 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 

Illustrated Catalogue Free 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Paraffine Paint Company. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Paraffine Paint Com- 
pany will be held at the office of the company, 116 Battery street, 
San Franciwco, California, at 1.30 P. M., on Wednesday, Ihe sixteenth day 
of July, 1902, to elect Directors to serve for the en- uli g year and for 
the transaction of such other business as may be brought before the meet- 
ing. R. S. 8HAINWALD, Secretary. 



San Francisco, June 24, 1902. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at therBte of three and one-eighth (3% %> 
per cent per annum, on all depot-its for the six months ending June 30, 1902, 
free from all taxes, and payable on and after Julj 1, lut'2. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 
San Francisco, June 27, 3902. 
Office— Corner Market. McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisoo, Cal- 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For ihe half year ending June 3D, 1902. dividends on term deposit* at the 
rate of three and six-tenths <"3 6-10) per cent per annum, and on ordinary de- 
posits at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum, free of t^xes. will be pay- 
able on and after July 1, 1902. 

FRED W. RAY, Secretary. 

Office— 222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building, San Franc isco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE^ 
Peerless Oil Company. 

Has declared a dividend of six cents per Bhare. payable August 1st., 1902 
Books oloBe July 26th. Tt e address of aiockholdt r W. I. Taze la desired. 
GURDON BRADLEY, Assistant Secretary. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 




Highland Springs 



ALWAYS OPEN 

The famous health and pleasure resort of I>ake County. Fin- 
est waters for the cure of Liver, Kidney, Malaria, Rheuma- 
tism and Stomach Troubles. Every comfort and amusement. 
Free swimming tank. Croquet, Tennis. Regulation bowling 
alley. Riding and driving horses. Splendid Trips to moun- 
tains or valley. 

NOTE SPECIAL RATES: 

One person in room, "small hotel,' $10.00 per week. 

Two persons in room, •"small hotel," $1S.00 per week. 

One person in room, "cottages," $11.00 per week. 

Two persons in room, "cottages," $20.00 per week. 

One person In room, "Main Hotel," $12 and $14 per week. 

Two persons in room, "Main Hotel," $20.00 and $22.00 per week 

Special inducements for school teachers or families desiring 
to remain by the month. 

For descriptive circulars and analysis of the waters call on 
The Tourist Information Bureau, 10 Montgomery street, or 
the Traveler Office, 20 Montgomery street, or write direct to 
Craig & Warner, Managers, Highland Springs, Lake County, 
California. 



Anderson Springs 



Only natural Mineral Steam 
Baths in Lake County 

14 distinct mineral springs of 8 different characters, hot and 
cold. H it Sulphur and Iron Buths. Board: $10 to $14 per 
week. Baihs free. Address J. ANDERSON, Anderson 
Springs, Middletown. Lake Coun'y, California. 

Fare— San Francisco to Springs and return reduced to $S. Send for cirou- 
lar Full particular* **t S. F. News Letter, b% Kenrny St . Sun Francisco. 



HOTEL 
MATEO 



MS '1 \1 10 
CAL. 



WfjE NN & SPfULDING 
Prop'rS' 



A HIGH-CLASS SUMMER 
AND WINTER RESORT 



Reservations may now be 
made for August, Septem- 
ber, October, and the win- 
ter season. 



Hotel El Monte 



LOS GATOS 



Under new management. Five minutes from depot. Now 
open for business. Table unsurpassed. 

RATES $8 to $15 Per Week. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the finest Static Galvanic sinusoidal and 
Faradic Electrical apparatus. A corps of well-trained nurses of 
both sexes skilled in all forms of treatments and manipulations. 

Rest cure scientifically carried out A quiet, home-like place 

beautiful scenery. Mt. Hamilton and the famous Lick Observa- 
tory in plain view; one block from electric cars; fifteen minutes' 
walk from the center of the city. Terms: $10 to t20 per week, 
including medical attention and regular treatment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



The Geysers 



One of the wonders of 
the world 



Now Management Newly furnished, Rooms hard finished. 
First Class Table. Me. Is a la Carle Dairy and Veeetxble 
"•rden. New Ba li Hnu«es. Electric Unlit. Swlmmlnr 
Pool. Twenty miles "f i he ttcsl fishitnr streams 



KATF.S— »W. 



II . 



Humlne 
FABHS FERATJII. Lessee and-Msnaeer 



BEAUTIFUL 



Laurel Dell 



T HE PR IG 1 \ T A L SW1TZER- 
LA.ND OF AMERICA. 



Largest dining-room in county; new myrtle cottage; 
hunting, boating, bathing, marine toboggan, new livery, 
coquet, tennis, Dowling. Tally Ho coach free to guests 
daily to our mineral springs; 15 different kinds of 
water. 
Accommodations for three hundred people. 

E. DURNAN. 
Laurel Dell, Lake Co., Cal. 



Blue 



BOATING. BATHING. FISHING AND HUNTING. 

boats. Tennis court and all other amusements. 



New launches ana 



HEDICAL SPRINGS 



Our famous "White Sulphur " Sprinurfl. Hot and Cold Baths, and etc. 
Pend f.r new pamphlel. O WEISwAN", Mldlake P. O. Lake Co. Cal. 

or call at ottice of C. N. W. W. B. R. Co., 650 Market Street. 



Lakes 



Hotel Benvenue and cottages 



LAKEPORT, CAL. 

LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking the 
shore on C'ear Lake. New pavilion boat-honse. and bowling nlley. 
Open ell the year. Special facilities for accommodating families 
with children f home cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and super- 
ior fishing. Lovely drives and walks. New sanitary plumbing. 
Modern improvements. Re-furnished, re-decorated. Rates: $8, 
$ 10, $12 per week. Special ratea to families. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



Skaggs 



HOT SPRINGS. Sonoma County: only i% 
hours from S. ¥,, and but 9 miles BLsglng; 
waters noted for medicinal virtues; best 
natural hot mineral water bath in State; 
boating and swimming in Wai in Spring 
Creek; good trout streams; tele, hone, telegraph, dally mail, express, and 
S. F. morning and evening papers. First-class Hotel and Stage f-ervloe. 
Both morning and afternoon i-tHees; round trip from S. F. only $5.10. Take 
Tlburon Ferry at 7:3u a. m. or 3,3j p. m. Sundays. 8 a. m. only. Bates, f2 a 
day or $12 a week. References: Any guest of the past seven years. Pa- 
tronage of 1901 unprecedented. J. F. MDLGREW, Skaggs. Cal. 

ROSS VALLEY 



TO LEASE 

Property known as Tamalpais Villa; suitable for hotel purooses; reo 
moderate; Kent station: 44 minutes from city. Apply to G. E. Butler, 

413 California Street. 



WISDOM CONSISTS in doing the right thing at the right 

time. 
WE ARE ALL WISE — afterwards— when It is too late. 
THE TIME to take care of your health is when you have It. 
NEVER ALLOW yourself to get into a rut or a groove, 

either physically or mentally. 
LREAK the monotony that makes so many men and womer 

old long before their time. 
TAKE an occasional trip. 

THE COUNTRY along the California Northwestern Railway 
is not the only place to visit, but it certainly is the best. 
ITS LOCATION between the coast and the Interior affords 

that salubrious climate which invites living in the 

open air, and fills up the system with renewed energy. 
CALL or write for 

"VACATION, 1902," 

A little book issued by the California Northwestern Rail- 
way Company, (The Picturesque Route of California) giv- 
ing Camping Locations, Hotels. Mineral Spring Resorts, 
and a long list of Country Homes where board for the Sum- 
mer can b» secured at from $6.00 to $8.00 per week. 

Ticket Offices. Kill Market St., (l hronlcle Bulldlnar) and Tlhuroii Kerry fool 

of .Market M, Oe-eral Ofllce. "Mutual Life Ruilding. Sani-onie 

and California Sis San Franciaoo 

H. O. WHITlNOllen'l. Manager B. X. RYAN.Uan'l. Paas. Am 



July 12. 190?. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 




THE THREE BEST THINGS. 

Henry Vim I'yke, in OutlOOk. 

Work. 
Let me but do my work from day to >h)>. 
In field or forest, at the desk or loom. 
In roarlns market-place, or tranquil room; 
Let me but find it in my heart t<> say. 
When vagrant wishes beckon me astray — 

This is my work: my blessing, not my doom; 
Of all who live. I am the one by whom 
This work can best be done, in the right way:" 

Then shall I see it not too great, nor small. 
To suit my spirit and to prove my powers; 
Then shall I cheerful greet the laboring hours, 

And cheerful turn, when the long shadows fall 

At eventide, to play and love and rest, 

Because I know for me my work is best. 

Life. 
Let me but live my life from year to year, 

With forward face and unreluctant soul, 

Nor hastening to. nor turning from the goal; 
Not mourning for the things that disappear 
In the dim past, nor holding back in fear 

From what the future veils; but with a whole 

And happy heart, that pays its toll 
To Youth and Age, and travels on with cheer: 

So let the way wind up the hill or down. 

Through rough or smooth, the journey will be joy; 
Still seeking what I sought when but a boy, 
New friendship, high adventure, and a crown, 
I shall grow old, but never lose life's zest, 
Because the road's last turn will be the best. 

Love. 

Let me but love my love without disguise, 
Nor wear a mask of fashion old or new, 
Nor wait to speak till I can hear a cue. 

Nor play a part to shine in other's eyes, 

Nor bow my knees to what my heart denies; 
But what I am, to that let me be true. 
And let me worship where my love is due, 

And so through love and worship let me rise; 

For love is but the heart's immortal thirst 
To be completely known and all forgiven, 
Even as sinful souls tnat come to Heaven; 
So take me, love, and understand my worst, 
And pardon it, for love, because confessed, 
A.nd let me find in thee, my love, my best. 



A SONG OF AUTUMN. 

(Erneat McCialTey, in Mirror ) 
Justice and Truth at last 

Virile shall come again, 
Brushing aside the Past 

Giving new life to men; 

When the pine leaves grow yellow. 

When the flint suard turns mellow. 
Charity's self shall come 

Eager to serve and aid; 
Lips that were once all dumb 

Will tremble with pity swayed 

When the flint shard grows mellow, 

When the pine leaves turn yellow. 
Love from his throne exiled 

Flower-crowned shall return; 
Fate will be reconciled, 

Hearts will have ceased to mourn; 

When the pine leaves grow yellow, 

When the flint shard turns mellow. 
Hope, with her harvest train, 

Shall follow the Maytime's breath, 
There will be sun and rain, 

Nevermore blight nor death; 

Man at peace with his fellow; 

When the flint shard grows mellow, 

When the pine leaves turn yellow. 



5ummer Resorts 




Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 

B intft Cnil Mountain, 

Delightfully located 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 
HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 



BATHING, FISHING 

Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 



B0WLING=== 



For the summer the Hotel Vendome management announces 
ninny new attractions at that popular resort. Two magnificent 
swimming pools are near the hotel, and guests may have all the 
pleasures of seaside resorts. 

===swinniNG 

Bowling, golf, tennis and ping pong are among the mmy diver" 
sions, Johannsen's Orchestra will be there all the time. Auto- 
mobile coaching from the hotel throughout the valley. 

GEORGE P. SNELL, Manager. 

At Hotel Vendome, 

SAN JOSE. 



Congress Springs. 

A charming resort in the Santa Cruz Mountains; 2 hours from San 
Francisco; delightful climate; swimming and all sports: table 
unsurpassed; best mineral water on the coast; open all the year, 
E. H. GOODMAN. Manager. 

BAY STATE HOUSE AND COTTAGES 

Santa Cruz— Sunny rooms, good table, best service; reason- 
able rates. MRS. L. MATHISON, Proprietress. 

BEN LOMOND Park House and Cottages; an ideal re- 
vniL* sort, unsurpassed climate, drives, fish- 
ing and bunting, two hours' ride to Big Basin. Moderate prices. 
MRS. I. N. HAYES, Proprietor. 

Agua Caliente Springs c^a"^^ 

Quaintly situated, surrounded by mountains and woodland, and consist- 
ing of three different hot springs. Beached directly by trains of the Cali- 
fornia Northwestern Railway or those of the Southern Pacific Santa Rosa 
Line, (no staging) New Hotel, equipped with modern improvements, ac- 
commodating 20U guests, Swimming Bath, private Bath. Ball Room, Music, 
Livery, fine Drives Tennis Court; Rates $2 and $2.50 a Day; 312 and 814 a 
week. Special terms for Families. Send lor illustrated booklet. Theodore 
Richards, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County, Cal, The Half-Fare Sunday Ex- 
cursions on the California Northwestern Railway enab e visitors to spend a 
day at the Springs, returning to the City on the same evening. 



Byron 

Hot 

Springs 

Contra Costa Co. 
CAL. 



A SANITARIUM AND RESORT 

The new hotel is the finest on the Coast. Elegantly 
furnished rooms an<l suites with private mineral 
baths- All modern improvements for comfort and 
safety. Excellent cuisine and an air of home com- 
fort. Rheumatism and Malaria yield quickly to 
these wonderful waters and baths. 

Address Manager Lewis, Byron Hot Springs, Cal, 
Call on Lombard & Co., 36 Geary Street, S. F. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT 
&TOWNE De r s 



TELEPHONE MAIN 199 



PAPER 



55-57-59-01 First Street, San 



Franoisco. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles, Cal 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Or. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



The Fastest Craft Afloat 

Surrounded by all tile precautious 
for secrecy which might be thrown 
around the construction of a challenger 
for the America cup, there has recently 
been constructed at a shipyard on the 
Hudson River the speediest vessel ever 
turned out anywhere in the world. The 
great goal of the present day in the 
maritime realm as well as in the rail- 
way world is high speed, and that the 
travelers of the sea are not to be left 
behind in the march of progress is elo- 
quently attested by the fact that this 
new flyer is constructed to cut through 
the water at a speed of fifty miles an 
hour, or faster than the average passen- 
ger train travels, even under present 
conditions. 

A strange craft she is, so crowded 
with heavy and powerful machinery that 
it would seem as though the mighty 
engines must rend asunder by their 
throbbing the frail body into the com- 
position of which aluminum enters so 
largely. If the sea were suddenly trans- 
formed into wax, and you were to lift 
this swift little vessel as you might 
a toy boat, the basin in which she re- 
posed would scarcely be large enough 
to hold fifty tons of water — a bulk no 
greater than might be loaded on a steel 
freight car — and yet within the limited 
confines of this diminutive ship is 
housed a mechanical giant, whose 
strength measures 4,000 horse power, 
almost as much as was possessed by the 
transatlantic liners of a few years ago, 
and higher powered machinery than 
was ever before placed in a vessel of the 
size of this one. 

Nor does this end the category of the 
novel attributes of this eccentric craft, 
which has been appropriately christened 
the Arrow. Strangest of all, perhaps, is 
the fact that she is both a steam yacht, 
upon pleasure bent, and a torpedo boat, 
bristling for fight, and may be changed 
from one to the other in less than two 
hours. What a boon, in truth, she would 
have been to the pirates of old, an inno- 
cent-seeming bark, lazily ambling tow- 
ard an unsuspecting ship, and then 
suddenly transformed under the very 
eyes of an astounded master and crew 
into a highwayman of the seas. 

The Arrow was built for Charles R. 
Flint, a New York capitalist with ex- 
tensive interests in all parts of the 
world. — Pearson's Magazine. 



Soft 
Harness 



You can make your har 
nesa us Boft as a gluve 
and ns touyh as wire by 
using EUREKA Har. 
ness Oil. You can 
lengthen Jta life— make It 
lust twice as long us it 
ordinarily would. 

EUREKA 

Harness Oil 

mnkeaapoor looking har- 
ii> -■< like new. Mtule of 
pure, heavy bodied oil, es- 
pecially prepared to with- 
stand the weather. 

Sold everywhere 
In cans— all sizes. 

RUo by STANDARD OIL CO. 




m&&up&8^mm 



The World's Regulator 

Nearly ten million Elgin watches 
act as one great pendulum in regu- 
lating the hours of business, travel 
and pleasure the world over. Every 

ELGIN 

Watch 

is made of the finest materials by 
the most skilled hands. 

Always look for the watch word 
"Ki^in," engraved on the works 
of the world's best watches.Send 
for free booklet about watches. 

ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO., Elgin, III. 

*q— — H 



THE HARNESSED CYCLONE. 

It was during the portion of his ca- 
reer when he lived in the valley of the 
South Fork of the Big Sunflower River 
that Henry Plymshaw, the inventor, 
made his most notable invention. This 
invention had to do with cyclones. 

One afternoon Inventor Plymshaw 
saw a fine specimen of a funnel cyclone 
coming over the prairie, and he called 
to me and said we would go out and 
study it, since it was evident that it 
was going to one side. The instant the 
cyclone sighted us it came straight in 
our direction. We weren't prepared for 
this exactly, so all we could do was to 
run. We were just on the point of giv- 
ing up, when a most extraordinary thing 
happened. Curious thing. Sort of natu- 
ral, too. That cyclone stepped down a 
fifty-foot well. And there it was. Only 
one leg. and that down a fifty-foot well, 
in the middle of a sheep pasture. If it 
had had two legs no doubt it could have 
scrambled out, but it couldn't make it 
with one. Couldn t do anything except 
revolve. And it (Irl. do that. / never 
saw a cyclone revolve like that one. 
M'ad, apparently, because it had missed 
Plymshaw and me, and got caught. 
So it just buzzed around like a top. 
Nothing in the world to stop it. 

Most men — mere men of action — 
would have been satisfied at getting 
away, and not having to revolve with 
the houses and lots. But not Plymshaw. 
No; he got to thinking, and what was 
the result? Put a belt around the stem 
of that cyclone just at the top of the 
well, set up a dynamo, strung wire, and 
ran all the machinery and electric 
lights in that part of the country. Regu- 
lar Niagara for power. Going yet. Noth- 
ing to stop it. you see. Wonderful what 
a thing mind is! — H. V. Marr in Har- 
per's. 



It is told of a learned professor, who 
was better at Greek than golf, that after 
a round on the links, in which he had 
foozled most of his shots, he turned to 
his caddie for advice as to improving 
his play. The reply of the ruthless 
caddie was: "Ye see, sir, it's easy to 
teach laddies Latin and Greek, but it 
needs a head for gowff." 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Tbieves, 

"What do you think! Clarice wont 
out and sang at an entertainment in a 
private insane asylum." "Did she say 
whether they showed their insanity 
much?" "Oh, yes; they encored her 
three times." 

Mrs. Malaprop — My husband's getting 
ready for the opening of the fishing 
season. Browne — Fond of the sport, 
eh? Mrs. Malaprop — Well, I should say. 
Why. he's a regular anglo-maniac. 

"What's that sound of running water 
out there, Willie?" "It's only us boys, 
ma. We've been tryin' the Fillypiny 
water cure on Bobbie Snow and now 
we're pourin' him out." 

J. Pierpont Morgan has jilst imported 
a fine jewel-studded Bible. M'r. Morgan 
is very fond of the Bible, due probably 
to the fact that it is a number of books 
merged into one. 

The steel corporation is devising a 
scheme to save ten million dollars a 
year. If it works all right everybody 
will try it. 

Mr. Bryan could tell President Palma 
a great deal about the value of enthu- 
siastic receptions. 




This show's the magnificent new h< 

_ NewEnflland , 
Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 

With this equipment we can now surpass even the 
wonderful results of the past 48 years. Music and 
elocution in all branches. Year-book on request. 

GEORGE W. CHADWICK. Director. 
Frank W. Hale, General Manager, Boston, Mass. 



Don't get discouraged. It Is often 
the last key on the bunch that opens 
the lock. 



I Guaranteed not to give trouble. Save money. 
I time and labor by mounting your shades on the I 
IMPROVED 

HARTSHORN 



SHADE 



WOOD 
ROLLERS 



ROLLER 



July 12, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 




By Betsy Bird. 

Everyone is admiring the pluck of Azalea Keyes in win- 
ning the paper chase at San Rafael Saturday last as brave- 
ly as she did. Of course she had a splendid horse, but her 
riiling was the admiration of all the critics. She came 
actually first, and she was very tired after her hard ride. 
She lost her hat. and her hair was flying. Mrs. Salisbury 
took her nonie in her carriage. Miss Keyes' stand in the 
paper chase matter will do much towards increasing the 
popularity of that amusement, and now there are society 
girls who are anxious to ride and show that Miss Keyes 
is not the only rider in society. Azalea Keyes has tremen- 
dous independence, both by inheritance and race. She comes 
of the Hastings family, who are rarely endowed with wills, 
and her father, Mr. Winfield Scott Keyes, is a financier of 
brilliant ability. He is one of the few men in this State 
finished intellectually in every branch and yet able to ac- 
quire millions. Miss Keyes is his sole heir, and she has four 
hundred thousand of her own. She is considered the clever- 
est girl in the younger set of society. 

Everyone at the paper chase was commenting upon and 
comparing the beauty of Miss Doris Jeffrey, who won a cup 
last year, and Mrs. Miles Baird, who this summer has a house 
in Ross Valley. They are both very picturesque beauties, 
and they resemble each other so much that one is often 
mistaken for the other. Mrs. Baird had the prettiest trap 
at the chase, and she is an excellent horsewoman. She 
wore a beautiful barege gown and a big pale blue picture hat. 
Miss Jeffrey was dressed in a frock of grey etamine over 
Nile green silk. Her Lat was of pink roses and plumes, 
and her sunshade was of white. Miss Kip was very hand- 
some in white. Miss Oge wore white, as did M'iss Wells. 
Mrs. Brett was another of the handsome young women. 

. Burlingame seems always to be in a state of trouble 
over golf. They are resolved that the cup shall not leave 
there, and biased ones accuse them of resorting to nearly 
anything to keep it. Last year it was the unsportsmanlike 
treatment of Mrs. Gilman Brown, and this year it is for 
inviting Miss Underbill, former champion of the United 
States, to aid them in holding the cup. Last year they pre- 
tended that the reason they objected to Mrs. Brown was that 
she was not a resident of Burlingame. Miss Underhill 
passes her time between New York and Santa Barbara, and 
yet she was asked to save the cup to Burlingame. 

Young Mr. Harry Scott is so much improved since his en- 
gagement, every one is saying. He is a devoted cavalier 
of Miss Landers. They are not to be married for a year 
yet, it is said, although these long engagements are always 
snortened. Miss Landers, whose ring is of pearls and dia- 
monds, is down at Pacific Grove with her cousins, the Misses 
M'ay, where she will pass the summer. 

At Mrs. Adam Grant's luncheon, given last week at Pas- 
tori's, a very pleasant hour was passed in guessing conun- 
drums after the luncheon, and prizes were awarded for 
them. 

Divorce and quick re-marriage makes no difference, gos- 
sips notwithstanding. Mrs. Harry Mendell, formerly Mrs. 
Janin, re-married, I believe, within six weeks after her 
divorce, a man younger than herself, and no one has a bet- 
ter position than Mrs. Mendell in society. She goes in the 
Tevis-Haggin set, and was a great friend of Mrs. Fred 
Sharon. Her brother was the late Ballard Smith, the famous 



lallst, and anothei brothei li a millionaire mining man. 
■ charming and bright I believe the Mei 
uaj three hundred dollars a month for the rent ol the 
Sidney Smltu place a) Ban Rafael this summer. 

Every one was greatly surprised over the marriage of 
Miss Goewey to Mr. EiavenB. it occurred when no on 
pected it. although ll had been rumored for a long time, 
11 seems that a naval officer appeared on the scene, a friend 
"i Commander Brice, and paid tireless court to Miss Goe- 
wey. The result was that Mr. Havens knew no peace until 
lie was married and took his bride away from danger. 

While Mr. Peter Martin was here every one remarked 
how much he has improved. Before he passed a year cam 
paigning in New York for the hand of Miss Oelrlchs liis 
manners were a little boisterous, but now they are charm- 
ing. The experience did him good. Mr. Walter Martin has 
absolutely reformed, and has taken to reading, and is en- 
deavoring to force his wife to do the same. To make the 
family completely remarkable, Mr. Downey Harvey has 




VAKNEY W. GASKILL, Special Agent 

With HUBERT BROS., Importers 

TELEPHONE BUSH 25 SAN FRANCISCO 



WEAR 



EAGLESON'S 

Fine Shirts and 
Underwear 



748 AND 750 MARKET STREET 
242 MONTGOMERY STREET 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



quieted down to the] French Revolution by Carlyle. A friend 
who has just returned from New York tells me that tne fu- 
ture Mrs. Peter Martin effects the clinging, striking effects 
of M'rs. "Jo" Tobin. It is said she is not a beauty, but a 
very stunning-looking girl. 



Mrs. Samuel Blair and Miss Jennie Blair will soon go 
abroad for a European trip. Mrs. Eleanor Martin has de- 
cided to do the same. Mrs. Pacheco will soon join her 
daughter, Mrs. Tevis, at Lake Tahoe. Miss Lillie O'Connor 
will shortly leave for Napa Soda Springs with Mrs. Oxnard, 
and later she will visit Tahoe. The Kips will join the Rev. 
W. I. Kip at Los Gatos for the month of August. Mr. and 
Mrs. William Irwin, with their party, consisting of M'rs. 
Ivers, Miss Irwin and Miss Wilson, will return to San Fran- 
cisco in August. Dr. Harry Tevis is to visit Tahoe during 
the same month. Judge and Mrs. James A. Cooper and Miss 
Ethel Cooper go to Tahoe next week. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Pope and Miss Taylor will be visitors 
at Tahoe during August. Miss Jean Nokes will spend July 
at Burlingame. Mr. and M'rs. Ritcnie L. Dunn and family 
will pass the summer in Blythedale. and later they will 
join Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dutton in Japan. Mr. and Mrs. 
Brook and Mr. Wright will pass two weeks at Deer Park 
Inn. Mrs. John E. de Ruyter and Miss Agnes Lane have lert 
London, and they will return home presently. Mrs. T. Z. 
Blakeman and Miss Blakeman will soon leave for Tahoe 
to pass several weeks. M'r. and Mrs. Gordon Blanding, Miss 
Blanding and Miss Henrietta Blanding, leave next week for 
Tahoe. Mrs. Harry Mendell will visit Mrs. Tevis at Tahoe 
during the summer. Mrs. Charles F. Mullins and her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. John Rodgers Clark, will soon return from Mon- 
terey, and go to Tahoe. Mrs. Zenit Nuttall and Miss Na- 
dine Nuttall have been the guests of M'rs. Abbie Parrott. 
Mrs. Walter Hobart was recently the guest of her grand- 
mother, Mrs. Neill, in San Rafael. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks 
Wright have been spending their honeymoon in the Sierras. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moore have taken a cottage at the 
Hotel Mateo for the remainder of the summer. Mrs. Beau- 
ford Mason has gone to San M'ateo to be the guest of Mrs. 
Erwin Rodolph. Mr. and Mrs. John Jackson recently occu- 
pied their home at Mountain View. Mr. and Mrs. Athearn 
Folger have bought the Jones place between Redwood City 
and Menlo Park. It extends over fifteen hundred acres. 
The Stirling Postleys and Miss Loughborough spent the 
Fourth at Monterey. M'iss Wells and Miss Oge recently 
passed a few days at the Hotel Rafael. Miss Bourn, Miss 
Landers, and Miss Wilson were the guests of Miss Helen 
Dean at the Hotel Rafael over the Fourth. Mrs. Grace 
Bailey of Belvedere has gone to Oregon for a six weeks' 
hunting trip. The Homer Kings and Miss Genevieve King 
are in Sissons for three weeks' outing, and Mr. Frank King 
has gone to New York and wih return with his sister, who 
is at Smith College. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Doolittle and M'rs. 
Rebecca Jennings have taken a house at Piedmont for the 
summer. Miss Ethel Dean has gone to visit her sister. Mrs. 
Walter Magee, at the Magee mine in Nevada. 

Lieutenant and Mrs. Martin Crimmins, nee Cole, have left 
for New York. After a twit) months' holiday. Lieut. Crim- 
mins w f ill report to Fort Leavenworth. Mrs. M'cLane Martin 
and daughters, the Misses Martin, recently were the guests 
of Mrs. John Boyd in San Rafael, but now they are occupy- 
ing "The Cabins" at Santa Cruz. Mr. and Mrs. Keyes have 
gone to the Yosemite. Mr. John R. Glascock and Mr. Alec 
Baldwin are remaining in the Yosemite Valley for several 
weeks. Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Kittredge entertained a party 
over the Fourth at their summer home at Los Gatos. Their 
guests were Mr. and Mrs. William Hamilton Morrison, Miss 
Florence Hush, Miss Mary Barker, Mr. Wallace Alexander, 
and Mr. Edmund Baker. Miss Sophia Horner was recently 
the guest of Miss Virginia Nokes at Los Gatos. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Wright will sail for Tahiti July 15th. 



Lieutenant and Mrs. Ashton Potter will go to Europe in the 
near future. 

M'rs. Antoine Borel and the Misses Borel have gone to San 
Mateo for the summer. Judge Lawlor passed the Fourth 
at the Hotel as did Mr. Truxton Beale, who was one of the 
judges of the paper chase. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Welch 
have taken a cottage at Monmouth Beach, New Jersey, for 
the summer. Mrs. William Alvord's accident was not so 
serious as reported, and she has gone to Tahoe. Mrs. Ed- 
ward Barron and family are at the Barron ranch, near May- 
field. Mr. Hermann Oelrichs and M'r. Frederick Webster 
spent the Fourth at Del Monte. Mr. John Parrott and fam- 
ily have been at the Hotel Del Monte. Miss Grace Spreck- 
eis has been visiting friends at Menlo Park, while Miss 
Lena Blanding has been the guest of Mrs. Harry Mendell 
at San Rafael. M'r. J. B. Shroeder, who recently was at the 
point of death from heart trouble, has recovered. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ashton Stevens have gone to Bartlett Springs. Miss 
Dolbeer and Miss Werren are at Monterey. 

Miss Adelaide Murphy is at San Jose, where she will re- 
main several weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Worden and 
M'rs. Towne are at Del Monte. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel T. Mur- 
phy are occupying their summer home at Burlingame. Mr. 
and Mrs. James Kendall are at San Mateo. Dr. and Mrs. 
James H. Hatch, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. John O. 
Harron and son, are at Tahoe for the summer. Mrs. John 
Jarboe of Santa Cruz is passing a few days in town. Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Dutton and M'iss Gertrude Dutton are in 
Japan. Mrs. Reginald Belknap is in Washington, D. C. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank P. Wilson and family have been at 
Blithedale for a month. Miss Bessie Zane and Miss Grace 
Buckley were last week the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Lent at San Mateo. Miss Florence Patrick has been the 
guest of M'iss Julia de Laveaga at Rowardennan. Mrs. 
Moseley has returned to San Francisco. Mrs. McNutt 
lately visited friends at Fruitvale. Mr. "Jack" Carrigan 
will visit the family of Dr. Brigham at Tahoe this summer. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. A. Miller have been passing the summer 
in Mill Valley. 

Mts. Graham, nee Kent, is visiting her parents in Oakland, 
having arrived from Manila on the last steamer. Mr. Ham- 
mond Wright of New York is the guest of his brother, Mr. 
Leslie Wrig v t in San Rafael. Miss Ethel Keeney, who is to 
be married in September to Mr. Tomlinson, will spend the 
coming weeks at Yonkers with the family of her fiance. 
Mrs. Yeamans and her daughter, Miss Painter, are at Ro- 
wardennan for the summer. Mr. and Mrs. W. D. O'Kene are 
at the Vendome, San Jose. M'rs. M. P. Jones, Mrs. Julius 
Reis, and Mrs. Somers are at the Vendome, San Jose. Miss 
Mabel Hogg and Miss Florence Callaghan are in San Jose, 
the guests of Mrs. N. G. Argues. Mr. and Mrs. Asa Wells 
have apartments at the St. Dunstan's. 

Mr. Augustus B. Costigan is spending a few days al 
Highland Springs. Mr. and Mrs. James Bishop are at the 
Bishop Ranch. The Princess Poniatowski, after a trip 
through Lake County, is again in the country place of the 
Joseph Sadoc Tobins, while the Prince is back at Burlin- 
game. Miss Dutton is visiting Miss Keyes at San Rafael. 
Mrs. Thomas Coghill and Miss Bessie Coghill are visiting 
Riverside, Napa County. Mr. Frank Grace was the guest 
of the Clark Potters at Lakeside Park, Santa Cruz, over 
the Fourth. Miss Gertrude Bates is at Belvedere. 



Visiting Cards 

Wedding Invitations 

and Announcements 
LE COUNT BROS. CO. 

633 MARKET STREET 



July 12. 1902. 



3AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



29 



• •thy Collier has been flatting Mrs. N..rris in 

Alameda. .Miss Klorn Low has l»'i-n the kih-si o( Miss Mar 

*ar<<t Caaaarij of lal I iiy Spreckala has Joined 

her mother at Honolulu. Mr. Philip Tompkins has gone '" 
the Toauntte. Mi>-s Phelnn will lass a tew weeks at ..!■• 
! Rafael. 
Leila Owen Ellis, daughter of Mrs. William Henry Ellis. 
and well-known in San Kranelseo soelety. was married In 
New York on June 12th to Mr. Joseph Lord Mellirney of 
New York City. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Qertrude Blethen 
to Frederick Gage Leach of Napa. Mr. Eustace Cullinan, 
the well known newspaperman and lawyer, was married 
Saturday last to Miss Kate l.awler. They are now in the 
southern part of the State. Miss Jane Boland was recently- 
married at Notre Dame de Victoires to Mr. A. McDonald of 
Los Angeles. Miss Boland is a sister of Mr. Boland, who 
married Miss O'Sullivan. 

Arrivals at Hotel Mateo: Mrs. Win. Haas and maid. Miss 
Alice Haas. Mr. C. W. Haas. Mr. W. L. Hyman, Miss Ada 
Kleinhaus, Mr. C. H. Crocker. MY. A. P. Mackey, Mr. G. 
A. Boyer. Mr. Courtney Ford, Mr. Irving C. Ackerman. Mrs. 
T. G. Hughes, Mr. T. Greenzereig, Mr. W. K. Kotzkow, Mr. 
Charles Lackman, Mrs. Ella Marshall, Mrs. R. Abel. 

Dr. George Franklin Shiels and Mrs. Emily M\ B. Deming 
were married in New York July 3d. They are taking a wed- 
ding trip through England, France and Italy. Dr. and Mrs. 
Shiels will return to San Francisco, where they will make 
their home, and where Dr. Shiels will resume his practice. 
Dr. Shiels was the only surgeon in the Spanish war who was 
recommended to receive the appointment of Brigadier- 
General by brevet. The doctor was mentioned for bravery 
in many actions in the Philippines, and all his superior offi- 
cers endorsed a recommendation that he be brevetted Briga- 
dier-General. This recommendation was concurred in by 
General Lawton. No surgeon has a finer war record, and 
in addition to receiving the highest praise. Major Shiels 
was universally honored and respected by every soldier and 
officer in his division. 

Mrs. Gregory, Miss Elsie Gregory and Miss Florence 
Dunham were in Florence recently. They will return to 
San Francisco in the fall. Miss Helen Wagner has been 
taking the rest cure. Mrs. Hearst recently entertained a 
party of friends at Pleasanton. M'rs. McGavin was recently 
the guest of Mrs. Delmas. Mr. and Mrs. James Flood, ac- 
companied by Miss Sallie Maynard and Mr. Twiggs, have 
gone to Del Monte for two or three weeks. Miss Helen and 
M'iss Virginia Gibbs have been visiting Mrs. Kane in San 
Aafael. Mrs. Hugn. Tevis has taken a small house in Den- 
ver right next her father's, and begun house-keeping. Mrs. 
George Gibbs has been entertaining Mrs. Andrews at her 
home in San Rafael. The Downey Harveys have decided 
not to bring out their daughters for two years yet. Mean- 
while they will be placed in the Sacret Heart Convent, 
Vienna. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Peyton and Miss Peyton will 
spend the summer months at Raymonds; near Los Gatos. 

Among the many recent arrivals at Highland Springs are: 
Miss McDonald, Miss B. McDonald, Mr. R. H. Rountree, 
Mrs. E. P. Partridge, Mr. Emil Judell, Mrs. A. Neuman, Mr. 
H. Neuman, Master A. Neuman, Madam M. Lada, Mr. and 
Mrs Webster Jones, Miss M. Yost, Mr. G. McNab, Mr. 
James McNab, Mr. E. R. Ellis, Miss Carrie Chaires, Mr. 
James M. Hanley, Mrs. M. G. Lytton, Miss Camille Lytton, 
Mr W. J Collins, Mr. G. D. Hibbard, Mr. C. W. Hibbard 



NOT NECESSARY TO GO ELSEWHERE! 

Sherman, Clay & Co. 

Are Chief Purveyors of Everything Musical 

from Steinway Pianos to Ragtime Ditties. 




Light on the Shoulders 
E-nsy on the Burtons — 

President 

Suspender 

A4Jn*U It 

RTVfJ Mil leWflDtSCdi 1 I 
h.. '■'I'r-ml.lrnr' 00 UlB hlirklr.. 
Trimmir.it* OmOftal nut. Undo In all 
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CRAIQ BROS.: 120 Sutter Street, San Francisco. 
IMPORTERS OF 

Scotch Tweeds 

AND FINE WOOLENS 

Suits $30 and up, Telephone Davis, 910 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS, Sg^ 8 ^* 

"GRAND PRIX" PARIS.^1900. THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 

AWARD. These pens are " the best in the world." 

Sole agent for the Uillted Stales. 

Me. Henry Hoe, 91 John Street New York. 

Sold by all stationers. 



Poeh Buyers for Farms 

UnQll or other rent estate may be found 
^^ wm ^ ■ ■ through me, no matter where located. 
Send description and price and learn my successful 
method for rlndlnc buyers. W. M. OSTRANDER, 
North American Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



and wife, Miss Hibbard, Mr. H. G. Playfair, Mr. M. Lamont, 
Mrs. Asa R. Wells, Mrs. C. O. Scott, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Crocker and three children. 

Following are arrivals at Hotel Rafael: Miss Mullen, Mrs. 
Mullen, Annie McCarrall, Blanche Partington, Mrs. S. H. 
Partington, M'iss McCloskey, Mrs. Manson, Mr. Stewart 
Manson, Mr. Merle Johnson, Mr. Grant Smith, Mr. George 
F. Whitney, Mr. R. R. Whitney and wife, Mr. Charles G. 
Kuehn, Mr. William B. Collier, Jr., Mr. H. A. Crowell, Mr. 
Alex Beyfess, Mr. Vivian Burnett. 

Miss Helen Dean gave a birthday dinner a week ago this 
evening at Pastori's. Among those present were Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Dean, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dean, Jr., Miss 
Maud Bourn, M'iss Mary Kip, Miss Connor, Miss Salisbury, 
Miss Emily Wilson, Miss Pearl Landers, Mr. Sam Boardman, 
Mr. Danforth Boardman, Mr. Tom Berry, Mr. Drummond 
McGavin, M'r. Will Collier, Messrs. Goldsborough and Wal- 
lace. 

Mrs. Thomas Bishop, Jr., gave a dinner Wednesday even- 
ing a week ago in honor of Lieutenant and Mrs. Martin 
Crimmins, nee Cole. 

A surprise party was given Mr. Sam Boardman Monday 
evening a week ago. Those present were Mrs. George 
Gibbs, Mrs. Kane and Captain Kane, M'rs. Salisbury, Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Mendell, Miss Mary Kip, Miss Azalia Keyes, 
Miss Salisbury, Miss Bertie Bruce, Miss Bruce, Messrs. 
Jack Carrigan, Everett Bee; Robert Huie, Wilberforce Wil- 
liams, Frank Stringham, Sidney Salisbury, George Whipple, 
Frank Grace, Sam Boardman, and Danforth Boardman. 



Windy summer days are here, and you will need 

something to protect your complexion from its effects. 
Nothing equals Camelline for this purpose. Used and in- 
dorsed by Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, and Adelina Patti. 



— . — Techau Tavern is the best place in town for a bite 
after the theatre. Its central location makes it a very handy 
place to drop into 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Win3low's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 




-- ^^4§g 



Insurance 




San Francisco had 38 Are alarms on the Fourth, most, if 
not all of them, caused by fireworks. The general average 
of firework loss throughout the United States seems to 
be about the same this year, although all returns are not yet 
in from the backwoods district of New, York and New Or- 
leans. 

• • • 

The Christian Church at Watsonville burned on July 
4th, with $6,000 insurance on the building and $1.50" on 
the pipe organ. Loss total. The original church building 
burned, and the second one followed suit. The lost struc- 
ture cost $13,000. While the Are was burning the chief of 
the fire department and a majority of the firemen and the 
hose team of the city, were at a celebration at Salinas. 
It might have been the same had the chief and team been at 
home. The team won first prize in the races, which fact 
may be pleasant for the citizens, but is of no moment to 
the church owners who pay taxes, nor to the insurance 
companies who pay losses. Rates are made partially on the 
basis of the fire protection afforded by the city in which 
the property insured is located, and rates evidently are loo 
low in Watsonville. One steamer and two hose teams and 
a hook-and-ladder company are not enough "pressure." 
The fact that the church was built of pine made its destruc- 
tion easier, while the blacksmith and wagon shop twenty 
feet on the north side of the church, and built of redwood, 
was saved. The next time rates are discussed in Watson- 
ville, the fire department will be cited as a reason for a re- 
duction, but when towns allow their firemen to leave home 
on the Fourth of July, the proper basis is that of an unpro- 
tected town; and what was true of Watsonville was true of 
lots of other cities on the coast on that, the most dangerous 
day of the entire year. It does not pay to have a sporting 
element mixed up with fire fighting. Politics are bad enough 
but politics tend to keep the men at home. Running races 
should be confined to beating the next hose company of 
the same town to the hydrant, as prevailed in the days 
"when we ran wid de old machine." 

• • • 

A bill has been introduced in the Louisiana legislature 
providing for a State fire marshal. 
« • « 

Again comes the proof that the over prompt payment of 
claims of life (and it applies with equal force to fire) in- 
surance policies, is not a safe course to pursue. The cry, 
"quick settlements means more business," is not worth 
consideration from anyone except the agent who thinks more 
of his commission than he does of his company's welfare 
and his own. The send a check by return mail method is 
an encourager of fraud and also betrays lax methods in the 
management of the company sending it. It was not long ago 
that this manner of doing business was the cause of trouble 
to a life insurance company in Los Angeles. The News 
Letter gave the full details at the time. Now an Associated 
Press dispatch from the City of Mexico shows that the 
Mexicanos are doing business in ways that are "peculiar." 
It says: "Three American insurance companies, which 
have exposed insurance swindles in this country, have 
caused the arrest of sixteen persons. Three doctors are 
held for trial on a charge of issuing false death certificates. 
The New York Life paid three fraudulent claims in 1901, 
two of $1 2.000 each and one $150,000 on policies issn .1 in 
1900. The graves of the supposed dead have been opened. 
In no case was the body of the insured man found. The 
Mutual Life suffered one loss, but recovered the amount. 



The Equitable Assurance Society paid one policy of $16,000, 
which may be recovered. Nearly all the frauds are the re- 
sult of a band of conspirators. The leaders of the band, 
Eduardo and Ramon Balmorie, who are brothers, have not 
been captured. Nearly all the prisoners are Spaniards. 
The report that one insurance company would withdraw 
from the neld on account of its losses is positively denied." 
There is evidence in these facts that it is a fairly profit- 
able game to defraud insurance companies, and nothing 
but exceptional care can prevent like frauds being repeated 
either at home or abroad. 

• * • 

Montana and the life insurance companies are now en- 
gaged in a fight to a finish. Montana claims the right to 
tax life insurance companies on their gross receipts minus 
expenses. The State Auditor has feinted at the Equitable 
and landed by notifying it that unless it pays the tax de- 
manded its license will be revoked. The New York Life 
went down and out in the first round and came up smilingly 
and paid. The Mutual Life is sparring for time, and the 
courts are to be the referee. The final decision will in 
this case go without question, and no fear of a fake need oe 
entertained. The Mutual is a little too nervy for the 
Auditor, but the latter is a ring general of experience, and 
will undoubtedly put up a game fight. The Northwestern 
Mutual is also in the scrimmage. The many battles and the 
countless fights in which the Northwestern has been engaged 
warrants the opinion that the battle will be a fierce one. 
In all the modern ring tactics of slugging, twisting and give 
and take as well as in side stepping claims, the North- 
western leads the list of heavy weights. Its ability to evade 
and avoid punishment by its two handed guard from blows 
aimed at its loss list, is well known, and its defense of 
this vulnerable part is regarded as almost impregnable. 
Barring accidents in this fight the Northwestern should win. 
In reply to the defi of the Auditor of Montana, the North- 
western put up at once the tax, almost $314, and then pre- 
pared for battle by at once suing to get it back. Latest re- 
ports from the ring-side state that the contestants are 
dressing in their lawyers' offices. 

• * • 

Manager Godwin, of the Preferred Accident, is on a 
trip to Alaska. 

• * * 

Colonel Fields of the New England Las returned from the 
Yosemite. 

¥ * • 

The Fourth took most of the insurance men out of town 
from Friday to Monday, and while insurance news is scarce, 
fish stories and tales of doves being mistaken for rabbits 
are as plentiful as scales on a fish. 

• « • 

The B'nai B'rith of Pennsylvania has re-insured its busi- 
ness for that State in the Penn Mutual. It would be inter- 
esting to know how the institution stands in California. We 
should be glad to see the correct figures for the last, say, 
"ten" years, together with the contracts, by-laws, and appli- 
cation. But if happiness depended on obtaining them, it 
will be long deferred. 

• • • 

The second vice-president of the Oermania Life, Mr. 
Wesendonck, has been visiting his agency in this city. 

• • • 

A writer in the Nashville American says: "Insurance 
should be for indemnity and never for speculation. That's 
the keynote of the whole thing. That's a hard thing to do, 
too. Without intending any reflection, the most honest man 
in Tennessee feels that a fire has appreciated in value what- 
ever was destroyed. Did a railroad ever kill a 'scrub cow'? 
The finest breed of hogs on earth is made by a cross be- 
tween a locomotive and a 'razor-back shoat.' After a Are 
old worn-out furniture becomes new, and 'just as good as 
the day it was bought.' Shelf and shop-worn and out-of-date 
merchandise, by some magical process, perhaps the heat. 



July 12. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



31 



becomes worth 100 cents on the dollar, and so on and »o on. 
Is this dishonesty? No. not Intentional dishonesty, only 
human nature Our lares and penates' are sacred to us. 
and we never fully appreciate anything until It is gone. 
The wedding coat that did service twenty five years ago 
might Lave been moth-eaten, but did It not cost 150. and 
I worn but once? It was not 'worn out'; therefore. Is 
It not worth what it cost? Really, you would not have 
taken 1 100 for It." Human nature and true to life, and still 
a dose or two of that justly celebrated and world-renowned 
specific, "a three-quarter limited liability and company in- 
surance clause" would invigorate and purify In the wor^t 
cases. 

• • • 
It is hardly possible that Mr. George H. Gaston of the 
Metropolitan will be the nest President of the United States, 
but he would make a blamed good Governor of the State 
of New York. 



INSURANCE. 



Unexcelled for liberality and security 

Life, Endowment, Accident and 
Health Policies 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

of California. 

Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building 

San Francisco 

C IRE. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 
PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 



OP LONDON ENGLAND 



C P. MULJJNS, Manaa-er. 416-418 California street. S. P. 
FlfcE IN8DBANOE 

Northern Assurance Company. 

OF LONDON .^SEaX AND ABERDEEN 



Cash Assets 

$20,000,000 

221 Hansome Street. 




Geo. F. Grant 
Manager 

San Francisco. 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(Incorporated by the State of New York.) 

Assets, over $74,000,000. Liabilities, 164,000,000 

Surplus, over $9,000,000. 

Tasues policies for all approved forms of Insurance; adapted to 
all stations and circumstances of life. Policies are free from re- 
strictions as to travel and residence; are clear, concise business 
contracts, and conditions are plain and simple and easily under- 
stood. 

Pacific Coast head office: Hayward Building, corner Califor- 
nia and Montgomery streets, San Francisco. Home Office— New 
York City. 

John R. Hegeman, President; Haley Plske, Vice-President; 
Geo. H. Gaston, Second Vice-President; Geo. B. Woodward, 
Third Vice-President; James S. Roberts, Secretary; Thornton R. 
Richardson, Assistant Secretary; A. S. Knight, Medical Direc- 
tor; Thomas H. Wlllard, Medical Director; Eugene M. Holden, 
Assistant Medical Director. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 
N. Schle»8lnger, City Agent. 304 Montflomery St, S. F. 




MAimrr, m: rA wr. »r m x. 




i >im«M iMimiiuii* Capital Sul>r»crftn?«l 

LONDON ASSURANCE. V"""' rM ' " 



OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Hnl.Bctlhcil 
Capital Paid Up . . . 
Asseta. 



$4,482,760 
2,241, 376 
18,196,146 

$5,000,000 

600.000 

2,602.060 



Founded A. I). 17M 



r. 



nsurance Company 



ny of /North A 



merica 



OF PHn-ADKI-PHlA. PENS. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders $6,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D., 1720. 



Capital Paid Up, $3,446,100. 
Surplus to Policy Hldrs, $8,i 



Assets, $24,662,043.35 
0,431.41. Losses Paid, over $184,000,000 



PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

501 Montgomery Street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON. Manaeer 
HERMANN NATHAN b PAUL P. KINGSTON. Local Manaeera. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New* Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF NBW ZBALANU 

Capital, $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4,318,611.00 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,008,423.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Dept.. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of (New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co , of Rhode Is, 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St., 8. F. 

Br.tish and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $67,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT, Germany. 
Capital, $2,260,000. Assets, $10,984,248. 

Voss, Conrad & Co., General Manager. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St., S. F. 



The Continental Fire Ins. Go. 

OP NEW YORK 
ARTHUR Q. NASON & CO., Metropolitan Managers 

436 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 
Telephone Bush 381. 



32 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 12, 1902. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due \o arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 

[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 

From June 22. 1902 



leave] 



[abbivb 



7:00 A Benlcla, Suleun, Elmlra. and Sacramento 6:55 P 

7:00 A Vacaville. Winters, Rumsey 7:55 p 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstosra, Santa Rosa... 6:25 P 

8:00 a Davis. Woodland, Knlerhts Landlne. Marysville, Orovtlle 7:55 P 

8:00 A Atlantio Express, Oedenand East 8:25 A 

8:00 A Niles, Lathrop. Stockton 7:25 P 

5:00 a Niles, Mendota, Hanlord. Visalla, Porterville 4:55 p 

8:33a Shasta Express — Davis, Williams, (for Bartlett Springs). Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff. Portland - 7:55 P 

8:30 A San Jose. Livermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placervllle, 

Marysville. Chieo, Red Bluff. * :25 P 

8:30a Oakdale. Chinese, Sonora. Tuolumne.... 4:25P 

9:00 A Vallejo 12:25 P 

9:00 A Los Aneeles Express — Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stookton, 

Merced. Raymond, Fresno, and Loa Aneeles S:25 A 

9:30 A Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 P 

10:00 a Haywards, Niles and way stations T-2.55 p 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Oeden, Denver, Omaha, Chicago 5:2* p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers 1 11:00 p 

3:00 P Bentola. Winters, Sacramento, Woodland, Williams, Willows, 

Knichtf Landing Marysville. Oroville 10:55 A 

3:30 p Haywards, Nlles. and way stations 7:55 p 

4 :00 p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa. Callstoga. Santa Rosa 9:25 A 

4:00p Nlles. Livermore. Stookton, Lodi 12:25 p 

4:30p Haywards. Nlles, San Jose, Livermore t8:55 A 

4:80 p The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tulare, Bakers0eld, SauKus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 9.55 A 

5:00p Port Costa, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton 10:25 a 

5:00 p Martinez. Antioch, Stookton. Merced, Raymond Fresno 12:2» p 

T5:30f Nlles Local 7:25 a 

6:00 P Haywards. Nlles. and San Jose 7:55 A 

t6:00P Vallejo 11 25 A 

«:00p Oriental Mall— Oarden. Denver, Omaha. St. Louis, Chicago... 4:25p 

7:00 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations 11:25 a 

17:00 p Valleio 7:55 p 

8:05 P Oregon and California Express— Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland. Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

J9:10 P Hayward and Niles til :55 A 

Coast Line (Narrow Gau?e). (Footof Market St.) 

|7:45 A Santa Cruz Excursion 18:05 p 

8:15 A Newark, Centerville. San Jose. Felton. Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations .'. 5:00 P 

t2:15 P Newark. Centerville. San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4:15p Newark, San Jose. Los Oatos t8:50A 

64:15 P San Jose. Los Gatos. Santa Cruz ^8:50a 



OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 



From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15. 9:00, and 11:00 
A.M. 1:00. 3:00. 5H5. p.m. 

From Oaexanp — Foot of Broadway.— 16:00. 18:00. t8:05, 10;00 A, h. 12:00, 
2:00.4:00p.m. 

Coast l t Ne (Broad Gauge). {Third and Townsend Btreets.) 

*:10 A San Jose and way stations fi:30 p 

tf:00A San Jose and way atatlonB 730 r 

f7-.nct a New Almaden /4:11 p 

1 7:15 A Monterey Excursion J8:30 p 

8;00a Coast Line Limited— San Jose, Gllroy. Hollister. Salinas, Sftn 

Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and Principal Inter- 
mediate stations 10:45 p 

9:00 a San Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz. Paolflc Grove. Salinas, San 

Luis OblBpo. and principal Intermediate stations 4:10 P 

10:30a San Jose and way stations -• ft:#6 A 

1 Van a San Jose, Los GatoB and way stations ., 5:30 i» 

oi:30 p San Jose and way stations "7:00p 

12 01 p San Jose and way stations . . . f8:00 A 

*3 00 pDel Monte Express— Only stops San Jose. 1 12:01 p 

3 30 p San Mateo, Redwood. Palo Alto. Santa Clara, San Jose. Tres 

Plnos. Santa Cruz, Salinas, Del Monte, Monterey, and Pacfflo 

Grove in:45 a 

4 :30 P San Jose and p-incipal way stations ... 1 ;30 P 

15:00 P San Jose. Los O«to*. and principal way stations 9;00 a 

6:30 p San Jose and principal way stations 10 01 A 

|6:15p San Mateo. Belmont. Redwood. Menlo Park, Palo Alto ffi:46A 

6:30r San Jose and way stations 6:3S A 

7:00 p New Orleans Express — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbpra, Los 

Angeles. Demlnc, El Pa*o. New Orleans, and East... 10:15 a 

nll:15 p Palo AUo and way stations +9:45 p 

ail:45 r San Jose and way stations „ .'. J9:15 p 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon . t Sundays excepted, 

t Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

oSaturday and Sunday only, ('.Monday only. 

"Dally except Saturday. 

The Union Teanbfkr Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotelB and residences. Telephone, Exchange 81. Enoulre ol Ticket Agents 
for Time Cards and other information. 

Chicago 'n less than 3 Days 



FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



AT 10 A. M. 



CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double DrawiDg-Koom Sleeping Cars, Buffet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars— meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 

R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617Market St. Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



CAL. N. W. RY. CO., Le "«» S. F. « nd N. P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TaomoN Fiaiiy - Foot of Market Str»t 
5 r ? E SJ? AT ?rZi 30 ' 9:0 °- 11:0 ° *•«■: I2 ^ 3:30. 5:10. 6:30 P.M. Thursdays- 
££S?.Ti2'* t o 1 i; 3 2 p J M ;. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8.-00 9:30. 11:00 A.M.; 1:30. 3:80. 5:00. 6:20 P.M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 

?^ r E a K ,H D t T ,*r?i 10 ' lfil M ' U:1 ° *•"■■ 12M - 3A0 - 5:15 *•*■ Saturdays- 

-Extra trips at ] :55 and 6:35 p.m. 

SUNDAY8-8:10.9:40 11:10 a.m.. 1:40.8:10 6:05. 6:36 P.M. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same sohedule as above. 



Leave San Franolsoo 


In Effect Apr. 28. 1901 


Arrive at San Franolsoo 


Week days 
7:10 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 


Sundays 
8:00 am 
9:30 am 
5:00 Pm 


Destinations 

Novato 

Petal uma 

Santa Rosa 


Sundays 1 Week days 
10:40 am 8:40 am 
6:05 pm 10:25 am 
7:35 pm 1 6:20 pm 


7:30 AH 
3:80 pm 


6:00 pm 

8:00 AM 


Fulton. Windsor. 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyservttle. Cloverdal© 


10:40 AM | 1025 AM 

7:35 pm 1 6:20 pm 


7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 


5:00 pm 
S:oo AM 


Hopland. TTklah 


10:40 am 1 10:2. am 
7:35 pm 1 6:20 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 Pm 


8:0" am 
5:00 pm 


Guernevllle 


10:40 am 1 10:26 AM 


I : ?2 AM 1 8: 2S A " 1 Sonoma 
5:10 Pm | 6:00 pm | Glen Ellen 


9:15 AM 1 l;40 AM 

6:06 PM | 6:20 PM 


7:30 AM | 8:00 am I 

8:30 ph | 6:00 pm 1 Sebastopol 


10:40 AM 1 10:25 AM 

7:36 pm 1 6:20 PM 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



^ 



July 
, July 1.0. 11 



Steamers leave San Fran- 
cisco as follows: 

For Ketchikan. Juneau, Trcndwell's, Douglas City. 
Skaguay. etc., Alaska, 11 a.m, : J u |y 6 . in, 15. 20. 25. 30: Aug. 

4. Change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

„ ,f°« 5; £" snd Pu "' Sound Ports. 11 

5. 10, 15.20. 25. 30; Aug. 4. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay). 1 :S0 
16,21,26,31; Aug. 5. 

For Los Angeles (via Port Los Angeles and Redondo), 
— ? 5? ., Barb » r »' Santa Rosa." Sundays, 9 a. m. ■ 
State of California. Thursdays: 9 a. m. 

For Los Aneeles, via San Pedro and East San Pedro. Santa Barbara, 
Si? rS?' Mon, <! r , < '> r ' San Simeon. Cayuoos, Port Harford (San Luis 
Obispo) Ventura. Hueneme. and 'Newport. ('Corona only 1 

Corona. 9a. m.. July 5.13. 21,29.: Auc. 6. 

Coos Bay, 9 a. m., July 1. 9, 17, 25; Aub. 2. 

For Mexloan Ports. 10 a.m., 7th of each month. 

For further Information obtain folder. 

Right Is reserved to chance steamers or sailing dates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel) 
GOODALL, PERKINS i CO., Gen.Agts. 
C. D. DONANN. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

10 Market St., San Francisco. 




SS "Alameda." for Honolulu. Sat. July 12, 1pm. 
S3 ••Australia." for Tahiti, Tues , July 15. 10 a. m, 
88 'Ventura." for Australia. Thura July 21, lOa.m 
I lue to Coolgardle. Australia, and Capetown 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPREOKELS & BROS. CO. 
Agents, 643 Market Street. Freight Office, 327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 



The Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 

Incorporated Under Royal Charter 1840. 
— and — 

Compania Sud-Americana De-Vapores 

First-Class Twin Screw Passenger Steamers 

From SAN FRANCISCO to Mexico. Central America, Panama, Guavanull 

Callao, Valparaiso, and all Ports on the East and Wesl 

Coast ol South America. 

Sailing from Howard 3, Pier 10, 12 M. 

Af.kq.oipa July i,,^ 

J! ERD July 23, 1902 

GUATEMALA August 2. 1902 

Colombia . August 15, 1902 

These steamers are built expressly for Central and South American pas- 
senger service. (No change at Panama.) Freight and passenner office, 316 
California Street. 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., General Agents. 




Illinois Central 
Railroad 



EFFICIENTLY SERVES 
A VAST TERRITORY 



DIRECT CONNECTION WITH 

OVERLAND LIMITED at Omaha for Chicago and points East- 

wilh SUNSET LIMITED at New Orleans for Louiiville, 

Cincinnati and points East. 

FOUR PERSONALLY CONDUCTED EXCURSIONS WEEKLY 



H. SNEOAKER, GENERAL AGENT 
648 Market St., San Francl sco, Oal. 




Mayor Schmitz, Mrs. Schmitz and Mr. E. P. Brinegar 
take a spin on the beach. With S. F. News Letter, July 19, 1902. 



Price, 10c par copy. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, I860. 



Annual Subscription, (4.00 




NETB| E'T^TER 




Vol. LXV. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JULY 19, 1902. 



Number 3. 



Tha San Francleeo NEWS LETTER In printed end Published every Satur- 
day by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott, TIaUeck building, 33) Sanaome 
street. Han Francisco. Cal 

Battered at .Man Francisco Poatofflee aa second-class matter. 

New York office— (where Information may l>c obtained regarding ■ubecrip- 
llona and advertising i 316 Broadway, C. C. Murphy representative. 

London office — 90 Cornhlll, E. C. England. Oeoreo Street & Co. representa- 
tive. 

Boeton— 36 Hloomlleld street. W. H. Pasrsctt representative. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter. Intended for 
pub ieatlon In the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be eent 
to this office not later than 5 p. m Thursday previous to day ol issue. 



The Spanish officers and men of the garrison on the Fer- 
nando Po were served up recently as chile con came by 
the cannibals of that island. 



When Minister Wu is removed from Washington, wil 
head be removed also? 



his 



How soon will we be called upon to relieve the Peary re- 
lief expedition, which sailea for the Arctic this week? 



The fall of the Bastile was again celebrated by the French 
this year, and the fall of the Chutes narrowly averted. 



If a few more Traceys get loose, the census man will have 
a light job next year in the State of Washington. 



The methods employed by the Board of Managers of the 
State asylums are fully as crazy as any of the inmates. 



If the Oakland "Enquirer" had been of a more enquiring 
turn of mind the present enquiry might not have been neces- 
sary. 



The Mayor's endorsement of high buildings is. another 
of his acts which do not jibe very well with his simple so- 
cialistic creed. 



Jeffries' trainers are afraid he is going "stale." That's be- 
cause he moved to Oakland. Who could keep fresh in that 
moribund burg? 



Mr. J. E. Gorman broke the world's record with a re- 
volver last Sunday. As he did his shooting at an inanimate 
target he is still at large. 



That the last eruption of Mt. Pelee caused a panic in Nor- 
thern Martinique is the only intimation we have that any- 
one is left in Martinique. 



If Mr. Tom Johnson of Cleveland gets the Democratic 
nomination, Mr. Bryan may sleep deep in the blessed as- 
surance that there is another crank in the field. 



It is unfortunate that the dead tell no tales, for the form- 
less relic of Captain Ward, washed ashore near San Rafael, 
might have solved the mystery of the sunken Rio. 



Mr. J. A. Wyman, who intends to open up a Chicago quick 
lunch place in London, will add dyspepsia to other American 
products in the commercial invasion of England. 



It is getting so that every drunken plumber who escapes 
from the police imagines that he is Tracey, and that he 
ought to get his name in the paper. 



After some strenuous experiences, it 
Mr. Roosevelt is about to bring out a 
"Hunting Presidents With a Kodak." 



s rumored that 
volume entitled 



The Fourth of July committee spent all but $1.60 of the 
funds appropriated. The News Letter calls for an investi- 
gation to account for the disposal of the $1.60. 



Bets are now on for the personnel of the Call's next libel 
suit, the nature of the charges to be preferred, and the 
amount of money that will be involved. 



Let us hope that the Nevada cattlemen who intend build- 
ing a fence across the Canadian boundary line will not 
commit an offence against the British Government. 



Judge Conlan's holding court by telephone suggests a 
new use for the wire. The same method might be employed 
by opposing counsels in hotly contested cases, thus avoiding 
personal encounters and other brutalities. 



Pope Leo, when he ordered a commission of cardinals to 
discuss the Philippine friar land question in a way that will 
cause no ill feeling, evidently had unbounded faith in the 
ability of the modern church to perform miracles. 



W,e no longer need a standing army to tight Indians along 
the Western frontier. What's the matter with establishing 
forts in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, where savage strikers 
are committing atrocities never dreamed of by Utes and 
Apaches? 



A Vienese wag wrote a lampoon notice offering a reward 
for the apprehension of "a dangerous madman, escaped 
recently from Berlin, his name Kaiser Wilhelm." Kaiser 
Wilhelm will not have to advertise in order to apprehend 
the man who wrote the notice. 



In Paris, M. Santos-Dumont soared around the Eiffel 
Tower. In New York, he chooses the Statue of Liberty as 
the axis of his flight. Let us hope that the Spreckels 
Building or the Ferry spire will be the point for which the 
daring South American will next cleave the zephyrs. 



The New York Stock Exchange unanimously agrees that 
women are failures as speculators. Undoubtedly. What 
person of common sense would mistake a woman for either 
a bull or a bear? 



As the News Letter predicted, murderer Charles G. Adams 
dodged from the hangman to the insane asylum and from 
the insane asylum to freedom. Our insane asylums are not 
entirely useless. As devices for saving the necks of murder- 
ers they have always proven efficient. 



The managers of the Johnstown mines now declare that 
their shafts are safe. As they made the same statement im- 
mediately before the explosion the miners will probably 
go to work with unshaken confidence. 



An Oakland hunter met a Durham bull on a country road. 
The hunter drew a red table cloth out of his wagon and 
waved it at the bull. He says that he thought this would 
frighten the bull. The bull might have been frightened, 
but by the way the hunter was last seen sprinting in the di- 
rection of Kansas City, many people are led to believe that 
the bull's timidity was at least infectious. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



ENGLAND'S CHANGE OF MINISTERS. 

As was expected the Marquis of Salisbury has resigned 
the Premiership which he has so long held with distinction 
to himself and with benefit to his country. Fifty years of 
active public life is enough for any man, although it is not 
as long by about thirteen years as good Queen Victoria 
served. Lord Salisbury's physical weakness rendered his 
retirement a necessity. He had been for a longer period 
Prime Minister of Great Britain than any she has ever had, 
with but two exceptions, and as far as the public verdict 
could control matters, he had at least five years more to 
serve. Mr. Gladstone's weakness made Lord Salisbury the 
strongest man politically in the Empire, and gave him an 
unlimited lease of power. Even those who approve of 
Irish independence must see the fatuity of Gladstone's at- 
tempt to accomplish it, whilst England, Scotland and Wales 
would have none of it. He deliberately threw away his ,u- 
ture, and Lord Salisbury fell heir to it. Whilst the charm 
of Mr. Gladstone's great personality will be long remembered 
his colossal blunder in regard to Ireland will never be for- 
given. Lord Salisbury, with the valuable assistance of Mr. 
Chamberlain's Liberal Unionists, saved the Empire from 
an exceptionally dangerous partition, and if he never did 
anything else, he will be honored by his countrymen during 
all time. But he was a capable and safe all-round minister. 
His management of foreign affairs has been beyond all 
praise. He stood off the erratic young Emperor of Ger- 
many until he had sowed his wild oats, and when he got 
ready for business they came together. He so tickled Del- 
casse, the only possible Minister of Foreign Affairs in France, 
that he became and is about as good an ally of England as 
she need wish for. He put it into the head of the young 
Czar, through his family ties, that he was the one potentate 
in Europe in a position to bring about a universal peace, 
and the treaty of The Hague was the beneficent result. Ten 
years ago he formulated England's policy in the Orient in 
three words, which we have since adopted as if we had 
owned them. We will maintain "the open door" to China 
at all hazards, he said. Since then the United States and 
Japan have commited themselves to that policy, thereby ren- 
dering it reasonably safe. When Grover Cleveland penned 
his warlike Venezuelan message, Salisbury quietly pigeon- 
holed it until our Presidential election was over, and then 
submitted the disputed question to arbitration and won. 
The thanks of this country are due to him for saving us 
from the effects of a hasty document written for political 
effect. He early determined to maintain friendly relations 
with this country at all costs, and he succeeded. The re- 
tirement of such a man is a world's loss. 



TIME TO BE UP AND DOING. 

The vast majority of the property owners owning front- 
ages along the line of the Geary street railroad have already 
signed the petition asking the Board of Supervisors to put 
up for sale under the provisions of the Broughton Act, a new 
franchise to take the place of the one about to expire; and 
without doubt a sufficient number of the balance will join 
in to make the petition practically unanimous. This is sat- 
isfactory, but it is not enough. Everybody who owns prop- 
erty throughout the vast district tapped by this road, is 
vitally interested, and while they cannot sign the petition, 
they can and should for their own protection exert them- 
selves to arouse such a public feeling upon the subject as 
will reach the Supervisors. Many of the Supervisors are 
clear-headed business men who can be relied upon to take 
a broad view of the question; some of them are demagogues, 
but even demagogues shrink back when they are confronted 
with an aroused public sentiment. So far, political agita- 
tors who desire to add the operation of a street railroad sys- 
tem to the spoils of election, have held the center of the stage 
on this matter; it is now time for the property owners to 



make themselves heard and felt. There is no doubt but 
that the Broughton Act is a constitutional exercise of the 
legislative power, and as a general law will prevail over the 
charter provisions. Upon the other hand there is great 
reason to believe that the charter provisions in regard to 
public utilities will go to pieces. But while this conflict is 
going on the interests of the property owners along the 
Geary street route require that the construction of the road 
into a first-class modern electric system should be in pro- 
gress. The politicians, to be sure, tell them that their in- 
terests are as nothing compared with the interests of the 
people (the people and the politicians being, in this connec- 
tion, synonymous terms.) The property owners should 
make it their business to convince these fellows that they 
are mistaken and the rights of property are superior to the 
rights of ward statesmanship. They should say in an em- 
phatic voice that the Broughton Act must be respected. It 
is a law of the sovereign people of California. It is manda- 
tory in its terms. It tells the Supervisors what they must 
do. 



NEW FACTS ABOUT THE MODOC OUTRAGE. 
According to persistent rumors coming from Modoc 
County, Calvin Hall was publicly murdered because he was 
a Republican. This is a slight offense, or even a virtue, in 
most localities, but in Modoc County it is different. This 
wild section is largely inhabited by lawless and shiftless 
Southerners, mostly poor whites from Missouri. Calvin Hall 
was one of the very few active Republicans in the district, 
and the fact made him very unpopular. The general feel- 
ing against him increased during the last presidential cam- 
paign, when he came out for the Republican party and did 
such vigorous and successful electioneering that there were 
more Republican votes in the district that year than for 
many past. This made the Missouri element furious against 
Hall, and they only awaited a good excuse to do him violence. 
Even in Modoc County, the mere theft of four dollars and 
a half's worth of goods is not sufficient excuse for a lynch- 
ing; but in Hall's case a poor excuse was better than none. 
When a suspicious hank of baling wire was found in an 
outhouse on his place, Hall and his family were dragged 
mercilesslessly into the open and hanged in a revoltingly 
cold-blooded manner. From an ordinary American commun- 
ity such an act would be unaccountable, but when we con- 
sider that Hall's lynchers were of the stock which is burn- 
ing negroes almost weekly, we are prone to wonder that the 
outrage was not even more barbarous in its detail. 



A YELLOW SUGGESTION. 
Is the local Hearst paper insane, or is it simply a fool? 
This is a query that must suggest itself to all who have 
followed its course in regard to Chief of Police Wittman. 
It is a course which is so obviously calculated to defeat its 
own purposes, that it is explainable on no other hypothesis. 
The paper hates Chief Wittman and desires to discredit him, 
yet it follows methods that are bound to make the gentleman 
friends, bring him sympathy, and win him respect. It pro- 
fesses to regard him as incompetent, but everybody knows 
that he is one of the most expert peace officers on this 
continent. It cites from time to time a record (not always 
truthful) of undetected crimes, but there has always been 
such a record, and it is no greater now than it has generally 
been. A few days ago it said that there was a special 
in the Western Addition who was making himself objec- 
tionable, and called him "one of Wittman's specials," but 
Chief Wittman has no specials, and this one was appointed 
before he became Chief. There is a daring robber operat- 
ing in the Mission who has so far eluded capture, and this 
is charged against the Chief. But daring robbers have eluded 
capture before Chief Wittman was heard of. When Nora 
Fuller was murdered, the paper called loudly for the cap- 
ture of her murderer, but when the crime was traced up 



July 19, 1902 



SAN FRANCIS P NEWS LETTER. 



to the doors of oaa of III own mplojrtoa mow a fag 

II attempted by ridicule to thwart every attemi 

him to his bloody Inlr And this suggests an t • 1 • ■ a T! 

Is of the yellow Journalism arc peculiar. Is the 
slon robber another Hearst paper hireling? Is he on the 
yellow pay-roll and for the purpose of furnishing | 
material? 

liurlni: the latter part of Ibis week the H 
paper has given another exhibition of the same sort of thing 
On Wednesday It charged that Chief Wittman controls the 
Grand Jury, and has compelled that body to decline to go on 
with the recently undertaken investigation — that. In other 
words, at his command, nineteen prominent citizen 
endeavoring to shield official corruption. The truth is that 
the Grand Jury has heard sufficient of the paper's story 
to realize that its "evidence" is what a prominent member 
of Its staff used to term "guff" — the same kind of "guff" 
which it presented to the Fiske Committee — and that it was 
relying upon its well-known penchant for intimidation to 
secure a favorable report. As the jury's term is nearly 
completed, Its members — few of whom are known to Cbiei 
Wittman — sought to avoid the ordeal of either becoming 
victims of its venom or doing injustice. If the Hearst paper 
has the "evidence" It claims, why does it not publish the 
same? It would surely make good reading matter. 



A BADLY-NEEDED CIVIC IMPROVEMENT. 
Will San Francisco ever rid itself of the garb of provin- 
cialism and assume the metropolitan dignity more becom- 
ing her growing importance as one of the great commercial 
emporiums of the world? Any of the strangers entering 
within her gates must be disagreeably impressed by re- 
minders on all sides that the romantic and doubtless chival- 
ric era of '49 is still in touch with the present generation. 
The approach to the city from the ferry is anything but 
modern. During the day, thousands of travelers are turned 
loose from the central depot ot trans-continental roads amirl 
a jumble of street-cars, hacks and express wagons on a 
crowded thoroughfare, to take chances of life and limb in 
a struggle to reach far-distant side-walks. This unseemly 
condition of affairs could be remedied in short order by the 
expenditure of a little money. A light, ornamental bridge- 
way, connecting with the upper floor of the ferry building, 
could be swung across East street, with lateral branches to 
the sidewalks on Market street. This would not interfere 
with street traffic, while it would certainly facilitate that 
of passengers to and from the ferry. It is only a matter of 
time until something of the kind is adopted, and the sooner 
the better for the reputation of the city as an advanced 
exponent of Western civilization. 



TRACY AND HIS EXPLOITS. 
' Of the convict Tracy, who three weeks ago escaped from 
an Oregon prison by killing his guard many things may be 
usefully said. In the first place, how comes it that when 
we have hardened criminals under lock and key we cannot 
.'keep them there? All over the country attempts to break 
jail are successful. The daily press furnishes accounts of 
them almost every day. There must be something singularly 
:loose in the management of our prisons. It is notorious 
that in almost all of them "dope" can be bought of t.ie 
officers almost without let or hindrance. In too many in- 
stances the officers themselves take to the use of the drug, 
and become usable by the prisoners. There is too much 
favoritism, excessive familiarity, and too little discipline 
in all our prisons. If you were to ask any of our wardens 
"if he had ever read an authority on penology?" he would 
stare in blank amazement and wonder what you meant. 
.We are badly in need of a thorough-going prison reformer 
from one of the older States in these parts. They manage 
these matters very differently in the States of New York, 
Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. Mercy to the wretched 



t now at large is no longer 10 be thought of, although 
the morbid sympathies of the Ignorant would ln< lint them 
that way. The human heart Is a strange mixture of good and 
•■Ml There are those who 'in heroism In Tl 

nnd would not he sorry If In- wen- to baffle 
his pursuers. But that is not good citizenship. The Inw 
either Is or should be the master of us all. Tracy has 
killed live men during the past three weeks, including his 
partner in crime, whom he shot In the back. Some of his 
victims have left wives and families unprovided for. nnd it 
se who are entitled to sympathy. We believe they have 
a good cause of action against the State of Oregon for let- 
ting loose a wild beast upon them. What Is to be said about 
the sheriffs and their posses who have had the animal sur- 
rounded for weeks we do not know. At this distance it looks 
as if they were arrant cowards. Tracy will probably never 
submit to be taken alive. For the sake of innocent lives 
he cannot too soon be shot down. 



RESPECTABLE GAMBLING STOPPED IN LONDON. 
When an American "Copper" goes over to London — if he 
ever does — he becomes a "bobby" and upholds the laws as 
such. The British policeman is the best in the world. He 
is firm, brave and respectful; he knows his authority and 
his limitations and is seldom corruptable. The London 
police owe part of their efficiency to the sort of men who 
control them, men who know the law and intend to enforce 
it. It seems that the American church fair was about to 
invade the coronation bazaar last week. Noblewomen en- 
grafted from American stems introduced as a feature of the 
bazaar an American raffle with all its phases of respectable 
gambling. Pianos, automobiles, jewels, were "put up" and 
tickets sold on chances, fhe idea took like wildfire (we 
are all gamblers at heart), and tickets were sent broadcast. 
Dr. Ritchie, the King's home secretary, got wind of this 
state of affairs and calmly announced before the House of 
Commons that the rafflers were breaking the laws of the city. 
The suggestion was acted upon with a promptitude that 
was good to see, the London bluecoat took charge of the re- 
spectable gambling scheme and "all bets were declared off." 
And now let us point a moral and adorn an editorial. 
Not so many weeks past San Francisco's Irish held an 
Irish fair. The function was not quite so important as the 
coronation bazaar, everybody but Father Yorke will admit, 
but there were many parallel points. For instance gamb- 
ling. Not only raffles, but every gaming device known to 
the slums was employed there to catch dimes and dollars. 
Did the police interfere, did anybody say "boo"? Hardly. 
It will probably give Father Yorke joy to know that he 
and his Gaels were allowed to do something which the 
English aristocracy were forbidden to do. It wasn't the 
fault of the police, it wasn't the fault of those who govern 
the police. It was the fault of public good nature, a weak- 
ness which has countenanced many another affront at the 
hand of Yorke whom the "Gael" calls "a politician of the 
Croker stamp." 



ENGLISH JUDGES AND THE BLACK CAP. 
The recent arrangements for the coronation of King Ed- 
ward, which has yet to take place, has developed many inter- 
esting facts of ancient procedure and the official invest- 
ture of high-class professional men who will figure in the 
ceremony. It has always been the order in Great Britain that 
a Judge, in pronouncing sentence of death, assumed the 
"black cap," giving the occasion an air of tragedy. People 
were therefore very naturally surprised to learn that this 
same headgear would be worn by all the Judges present at 
the coronation. It now appears that this black cap, or coif, 
is part of the Judge's official costume, and passing death 
sentence is only one of the occasions on which it must be 
worn. The wig is a later innovation, accepted as conven- 
tional by established precedent. We live to learn. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



Reminiscences No. 17 



By an Old Newspaper Man. 

If the men and things of the past 
The Origin of our were not recalled occasionally, the 
Present Libel Law. interesting events of any given 
community would hardly live in the 
memories of most of its people for more than ualf a genera- 
tion. Here comes the thirty-three-year-old Chronicle, for 
instance, and forgets its own brief history. In a leading edi- 
torial it published the other day, it got shockingly mixed up 
over tne libel law of the State. Among other things it 
said: 

"The question of jurisulct.-on seems to be an involved and 
difficult one. and Judges may disagree. Some years ago. the 
Legislature enacted a law permitting any one who considers 
himself libeled by a newspaper, to bring a civil suit or en- 
ter a criminal complaint either in his own county or in the 
county in which the paper printing an alleged libel is pub- 
lished. The evident intent was to enable the complainant 
to institute and conduct his case without incurring the cost 
of going a long distance with his witnesses, who may be 
presumed in most cases to live in his own neighborhood. 
* * * It is a very queer muddle." 

As a matter of fact, the Legislature passed no such law, 
and what the Constitutional Convention, that dealt with the 
subject, intended, was to relieve the Chronicle of an ex- 
cessively embarrassing position in which it found itself. 
Senator Aaron A. Sargent had for some time been prosecut- 
ing its proprietors for criminal libel in one county after 
another, and threatened to file separate complaints in every 
county in the State, which the law, as it then stood, per- 
mitted him to do. Technically, a newspaper is published 
in every county and State in which it has an agent to sell 
it. M'r. Charles de Young stood his trial on that single 
charge in three different counties, but managed to go free, 
although at considerable cost, and on the last occasion by 
one juror only standing out for acquittal. The counties 
were indignant at being saddled with the complainant's 
costs, and the people generally thought the matter had 
gone far enough. It was, moreover, felt that a newspaper, 
however innocent, could be ruined by such a multiplicity 
of proceedings. Heaven knows that in times past, if not 
in times present, the denunciatory functions of the press 
were sadly needed in the public interests. The Constitu- 
tional Convention happened to be in session at the time of 
which we are speaking, and Mr. de Young was advised to go 
before that body, which he had done much to elect, and seek 
to have embedded in the organic law of the State such 
enactments as would forever safeguard the free and honest 
expression of opinion on the part of the press. The sections 
of the State Constitution relating to libels as they stand to- 
day were the result. The confining of the jurisdiction in 
such cases to one of two places was the primary purpose of 
the De Youngs, and if the Chronicle does not know that, 
what in the world does it know? It was one of the fights 
of its life. 

The Chronicle further says that "the 
The Question of question of jurisdiction in the Gage 
Residence. libel cases seems to be involved and 

difficult." Not at all. It is as plain as 
the English language can make it. The jurisdiction lies 
either in the county in which the libel was originally pub- 
lished or in the county in which the complainant resides. It 
is pretended, however, that Governor Gage has his legal 
residence in Sacramento, because of his occupancy of the 
Gubernatorial office. Bah! Has anything ever been better 
established in this country than that a citizen does not lose 
his home residence by reason of his temporarily occupying 
an official one? The officials at Washington go to their 
various States to vote. We all know that our Presidents 
qo the same thing. 'Cause why? Their home is their legal 



residence. They could not get registered there unless it 
were. Governor Gage is registered and votes in Los Angeles 
County and does not vote in Sacramento, which settles the 
question of his legal residence, and determines where he 
may bring a libel suit. Playing a game of ducks and drakes 
with the law very often goes in our police courts, but short 
work is made of it when it reaches the Supreme Court of 
the State. That a lawyer, with the slightest claim to pro- 
fessional ability, should undertake to seriously argue that 
a citizen necessarily loses one residence and gains another 
by his election to office, is calculated to bring the practice 
of the profession into contempt. 

Can an outsider, with no interest in a 
Who May Bring case other than that of the general pub- 
a Libel Suit. lie, enter on his own account a prosecu- 
tion for libel? The Chronicle says 
that "any citizen has a rignt to make complaint of a crime." 
He probably has, if that crime be a felony. But if it be only 
a misdemeanor, as a libel is, it does not necessarily follow 
that a stranger, who has been in no manner wronged, has 
a right to set the law in motion against a man he dislikes. 
It is a marvelous interpretation of the law for a daily news- 
paper to give out. If that interpretation were correct, news- 
papers would be at the mercy of every crank with a pen- 
chant for litigation at the public expense. It is hardly pos- 
sible to pick up one of our dailies that does not contain pub- 
lications that are libels per se, and that could, as such, be 
made the basis of criminal prosecutions. There would be 
no end to that kind of business if it were once established 
that the law tolerated it. But the exact point in question 
has ere now been passed upon by the courts of this city, as 
the Chronicle ought to know. When the well-known pam- 
phlet was published exposing the terrible life of the Rev. 
Isaac M. Kalloch, then Mayor of San Francisco, the Chron- 
icle was interested in having Kalloch make answer. He 
discreetly remained silent. A member of his church was 
Induced to enter a complaint for libel against the author 
of probably the most libelous pamphlet that was ever pub- 
lished in this or any other city. The member, reasonably 
enough, claimed that he had a right to know whether his 
pastor was a persecuted man or one who should be dismissed 
tne pulpit at once; besides, he said, that as a citizen he ^aa 
a right to know if the Mayor were that kind of a man. The 
author of the pamphlet appeared, admitted publication, and 
proposed to proceed with his defense by calling I. M. Kal- 
loch as his first witness, but he was nowhere to be found. 
A friendly sheriff had taken him in. to keep his son company 
in the County Jail. Continuances were taken from day to 
day, until Kalloch appeared with his lawyer, who read a 
lengthy affidavit showing that he was no part to the pending 
proceedings, and objected to them. Mr. Henry E. Highton, 
well known as one of the ablest men at the bar, quoted au- 
thority after authority in favor of his view, which the court 
sustained, and the complaint, in consequence, was dismissed. 



'Si?-- 



<<G 







July 19, 1902. 



SAN FBANCISC > NEWS LETTER. 



rn fur tho just Intel 
Th« Grc*ter the Truth lion of the law of libel 
tht Greater the Libel, the motive for this publication. 
The writer takes no Intel 
to any libel stilts now pending, but hi 
an Interest in seeing that the libel law is administered In 
with Its tme intent and meaning. Justly oper 
ated. It will long eontinue the shield an.! protection ..f m 
Independent press, hut distorted and wrenched to byU pur 
poses. It will be amended out of usefulness at the Hi 
portunity. For this reason, we should all he exceedingly 
watchful of the precedent established in its operation. C 
have quite a fashion of jumping the tracks in libel i 
Some years ago Judge WTieeler. of one of the then Dl 
Courts, stopped the publication of the News Letter, at mid- 
night, Just before going to press. He was informed and be- 
lieved, he said, that the paper was about to publish a libel, 
and if he allowed the publication it would then be too late 
to remedy the evil. The paper took an appeal from his in- 
junction, which was dissolved, the Supreme Court not think- 
ing it necessary to hear frotn the appellant's counsel. "It 
is too plain for argument.' - said the court. "There can be 
no injunction to restrain the publication of a future libel. 
The Constitution says: 'Every person may speak, write and 
publish his sentiments upon all subjects, being responsible 
therefor to the law.' " Judge Wheeler got down off his own 
Bench, applied for a re-hearing, which was granted to him 
as a matter of courtesy, and for a whole afternoon he argued 
for the correctness of his own judgment, at the termination 
of which the court quietly said again: "We don't care to 
hear from the other side. The injunction is dissolved." This 
case shows the necessity for vigilance to prevent the crea- 
tion of dangerous interpretations. One such has been al- 
lowed to pass into vogue that should go to the Supreme 
Court as soon as possible. The practice now is to dismiss 
any libel that is proven in whole or in part to be true. That 
is a dangerous perversion of the law, which says that "if it 
shall appear that the publication was made from good 
motives and for justiflaole ends, and is true, the suit shall 
be dismissed." The good motives and justifiable ends 
make all the difference, and they must affirmatively appear. 
If they do not, and malicious ones do, then the old maxim 
of law is as true as it ever was: "The greater the truth 
the greater the libel." 

- These reminiscences are written 
Correcting an Error, without the aid of note or memoran- 
dum oi any kind, and are set down 
just as they occur to the writer's recollection at the moment 
of writing. That errors will creep in under such circumstan- 
ces is to be expected, and corrections are invited and wel- 
comed, but they must be corrections of facts and not of 
opinions. It appears that the "Reminiscences" fell into the 
error of describing the ever-to-be-remembered Colonel E. 
D. Baker as Senator from California instead of Oregon. It 
was but a momentary lapse of memory, and of no great 
importance anyhow. California always has, and always 
will claim, the immortal Baker as her own. It was here 
that he took up his residence upon coming to the Coast. 
It was here that he sought to enter public life by running for 
Congress. It was here tnat his greatest oration was deliv- 
ered, and it is here that the tallest monument to his memory 
is erected. The Sacramento Bee, as lively and as busy as 
ever, says that this writer's "praise of Baker is well bestowed 
but his reflections on Broderick are unmerited and unjust." 
That is a matter of opinion, about which Californians never 
have and never will agree. But there was no reflection en 
Broderick, unless it was contained in the sentence: "Both 
men met. violent deaths, Broderick in the 'field of honor,' 
in name only, and Baker in the best sense of the term." If 
that does any injustice to the truths of history, it would 
be well to point out wherein it exists. 




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8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



AT THE HOTELS AND RESORTS. 

Quite a number ol society people are at the Lake County 
resorts this season. M'rs. William H. Crocker is at High- 
land with her family, and Mrs. Linda H. Bryan o£ Buchanan 
street, has her three children with her at the same resort. 
The Nuttalls are also there. 

Among many of the recent arrivals at Highland Springs 
during the past week from San Francisco, are: Mr. Charles 
A. Stewart, Mr. J. M. Radmaker, Mrs. I. M. Canning, Mr. J. 
H. Campbell, Miss Celia Lewison, Mrs. E. M. McGary, Mrs. 
W. H. White, Master W. Hastings, Miss Lee, Miss Laura 
Lee, Mrs. William L. Carson, Miss Haheu, Miss Sinclair, 
Mr. R. Launder, Jr., Mrs. L. H. Bryan and children, Mr. W. 
Larsen and wife, Mr. E. Hendrickson and wife, MT. H. Hen- 
drickson, Mr. M. Johnson, Mr. E. E. Cook and wife, Miss M. 
Cook, Mr. E. W. Cook, Miss Dorchire and sister, Mrs. Thomas 
Mellersh, Mr. Claude M'ellersch, Mr. M. F. Joy, Mrs. Josie 
Burr, Miss Burr, Mr. S. E. Holmes, Mr. W. H. Gossip, Mrs. 
A. M. Thomas, Mr. George H. Ismon, Mr. Leon Frank and 
wife, Mr. C. H. Robinson, Mrs. M. Chamberlain, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. A. Ross, and Mr. H. E. Lamar. 

Following are among the arrivals at the Hotel Mateo: 
Mrs. Goodman, Miss Hirschl, Messrs. J. H. Routt, B. Aldrich, 
C. H. Anderson, J. M. Hetrich, L. M. Brud, J. Crawley, R. 
Lloyd, Arthur J. Williams, John R. Snow, S. A. Wise, H. L. 
Tassett, E. R. Stower, C. H. Minto, O. D. Osbourne and 
wife, B. S. Dowas, J. B. Toplitz, W. J. Willy, Mrs. C. Schles- 
singer, Mt. G. A. Boyer. 

Following are among the arrivals at the Hotel Rafael: 
Messrs. F. W. Stephenson, S. I. Ackerman, A. E. Beyfuss, 
John Hunt, James Graham, Dr. John Dunn, L. D. Colon. 
Milton S. Latham, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Hall, Mr. S. Ponton De 
Arce. 

The Hotel Del Monte entertained one hundred more guests 
this year on the Fourth of July than ever before on the na- 
tional holiday. This is a fair indication of the increasing 
popularity of California's most famous hotel. There is suffi- 
cient reason for this, for the skill with which the manage- 
ment foresees the requirements of guests is proverbial 
among society people all over the continent. A corps of 
workmen are now busy on the Del Monte links, which is 
being improved on an elaborate scale, and when finished 
will be the championship links of the West. The course 
is being extended from nine to eighteen holes and other 
elaborate work done. The new course will not be complete 
till spring. 

The following are registered at the Occidental Hotel: 
Col. L. W. Colby of Beatrice, Neb., staff of Governor Savage 
of Nebraska; Col. M. S. Bangham of Sacramento, Ass't. Adj.- 
Gen. of California; Hon. E. B. Edson of Gazelle; Bishop 
Nichols and family of San Mateo; David S. Day of Williams, 
Arizona, United States Geographic Survey. 



The Jesse Moore, Hunt Co., proprietors of Jesse Moore 
Whisky, are in new quarters. They have removed to 200- 
202-204 Davis street, where their many friends will find them 
in a handsome new store and office. 



THE NEW ELECTRIC-LIGHTED OVERLAND LIMITED 
Is a revelation in the art of car building. Every want seems 
to have been foreseen. Each seat is provided with an ad- 
justable electric reading lamp so that one can read either 
sitting or reclining. The highest taste has been shown in 
the choice of soft tones in the decoration of the walls and 
ceilings, with which the carpets and upholstery match per- 
fectly. The traveling branch of the Book-Lovers Library in 
the composite car will prove a great convenience, as mem- 
bers can take a book onto the train, exchange it there, and 
take another with them when they leave. Telephone ser- 
vice by special wire is provided up to the hour of depart- 
ure at the terminals, a special operator being in attendance 
in the observation car at the rear of the train. The train 
leaves San Francisco at 10:00 a. m., daily, and reaches Chi- 
cago in three days. Secure descriptive booklet at Southern 
Pacific Information Bureau. 613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Ill 



(I 
ll 



1 



By W. A, FRASER. 

The Most Thrilling Story of 
the Year. 



By special arrangement with the own- 
ers of the copyright, "The Evening Post," 
will publish the new and thrilling story, 
"Thoroughbreds," by W. A. Fraser, the 
author of "The Outcasts," "Mooswa," etc. 
The first Installment of "Thoroughbreds" 
will appear In "The Post" of July 23. 
This novel has not heretofore been pub- 
lished. 

In this ne wstory Mr. Fraser has turnod 
again to his most familiar ground, the 
racing world. The roaring description of 
the Brooklyn Handicap, the runaway on 
the track and many other startling cli- 
maxes make each Installment a wonderful 
story In Itself. "The Post" would sug- 
gest that you send your subscription In 
as early as possible, to Insure prompt 
delivery. 

Subscription price of "The Post" Is 43 
cents per month. Order by telephone or 
at the Publication Office, "Post" Building, 
Bush and Kearny streets, San Francisco. 



i 



[I 





By W. A, FRASER. 
The Most Thrilling Story of the Year 



July 19. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISc NEWS LETTER. 




Under the title ol "Hanson's 
Stories by the opening story, Scrlbner's havi 

Mr. R. h. Davis rolnme of tales by Mr Ri 

Harding Davis, They have been pub- 
lished before In magazine form, but admirers of Mr David 
will be glad to have then between rovers. 

Mr. Paris is distinctively and essentially a depicter of life 
as it Is lived. He interests himself little in psychological 
problems, inquires seldom why a thing Happens, and still 
often leaves Lis reader In doubt as to what has happened. 
For years he was a newspaperman, and as such he receive l 
the training which enables him to grasp a story an. I to tell 
it in a clear and forcible manner. His English is not always 
correct — but he writes entertainingly of entertaining sub- 
and displays a knowledge of human nature and a 
broad sympathy with it. Animals appeal to him. too. as 
may he seen in "The Bar Sinister." a story of a bull-dog of 
ignoble birth, which, in spite of his shady ancestry, and 
because of the good blood in him that he was not at first 
given credit for. won his way in the world. It is told in the 
first person — acted by the dog. One does not need to be a 
lover of animals to appreciate this story. He has male 
the animal very human, and has him tell a tale absorbing, 
amusing, pathetic and realistic. The reader eagerly follows 
the fortunes of this outcast dog, admires his superb courage, 
and is glad when at last he finds a haven in rest. 

Ranson's Folly" tells of an army officer on the frontier, 
who. tiring of monotonous garrison life, makes a wager that 
he will ride out and hold up the stage. He does it, too, 
althougn he takes nothing, and as the real robber, the 
terror of the country, holds up the paymaster on the same 
evening. Ranson gets into all sorts of trouble, narrowly 
avoiding a tragic fate. The plot is ingenious, although lack- 
ing in logic toward the end. Still, the story is interesting. 

The Spanish-American war furnishes material for "The 
Derelict," a story of a group of special correspondents of 
whom Channing, a ne'er-do'well, is the genius, but is beaten 
out of the reward his work should bring. Mr. Davis's own 
experience as a special correspondent at the front has en- 
abled him to write an excellent story in this tale of war. 
He gives great battle pictures and describes army life witli 
fidelity and in an interesting manner. ' 

I, a Lettre D'Amour" is a London story, located in a 
cafe, with a soulful musician, a soulless woman and a 
love-mad man as the characters. It is fairly good, but lacks 
the strength of the others. "In the Fog" is of London, and 
an exclusive club is the setting. It is something of a hoax, 
this story, not only on some of the characters but on tne 
readers. It is amusing, thougn, and holds the attention will. 

Charles Scribner's Sons, New York. Price $1.50. 

The next best wring to a journey. 
More Little Peppers. abroad is reading a good account 
of one — such, for instance, as 
"Five Little Peppers Abroad," by Margaret Sidney. The 
author has written entertainingly of the five Peppers before, 
and now she takes the readers through foreign lands with 
them. She tells in a bright, breezy style of the travels in 
Europe undertaken under proper chaperonage by these he- 
tional Peppers. It is a book written essentially for the young 
and it will afford them much happy entertainment and in 
strnction. Children will learn twice as much of history anil 
geography from semi-fictional works as from school bool<s, 
and parents would do well to provide them with such works 
as "Five Little Peppers Abroad." 

The Lothrop Publishing Co.. Boston. Price, $1.10. 



At t! in season of tl> 

Trout and Salmon: when Ho I!,. I Qods ate , ailing." and 
How to Catch Them, man lovetb not his home, It is fitting 
that another volume from the 

if which Mi Caspai » 

litor. should In- at hand. This particular 

"Salmon and Trout." ami is a symposium of advice an 

• e by Messrs. Dean Sage, C H. Townsend, ii. M. 

Smith and William ('. Harris, modern l/aak Waltons all 
who have whipped every American Btream from Washington 

to Massachusetts. Tin- whole i k is a sane attempt to 

show, without any recourse to ti. or tin.' writing, 

what is known about American trout and salmon, where thOJ 
most abound and how best to catch them. Mr. S»l 
discoursing on the salmon of the Atlantic tells something 
which sounds new and is certainly Interesting. 

"The explanation of tne fact that salmon, even those 
caught in salt water, are so very rarely found with 
food inside them, is that they have in common with some 
of the higher forms of creatures the power of emptying thell 
stomachs when danger is near and their activity is to he 
called in play. They have certainly been observed in this 
acl on more than one occasion." 

Poor salmon! Those who have suffered from mal de mer 
can sympathize with the plight of the fish. 

The Pacific salmons are discoursed by C. II. 
Townsend and H. M. Smith. Mr. Smith writes on the 
trouts of America. The book is refreshingly illustrated by 
Messrs. A. B. Frost, Tappan Adney. Martin Justice and 
others. Appended to the book is an illustra'ed treatise on 
flies and how to tie them. Trout and salmon fishermen 
should have this book, which is practical and common- 
sense. 

The M'acmillan Company, New York. 

Iu Macmillan's series of "English 
George Eliot as a Men of Letters," we have at hand Mr. 
"Man of Letters." Leslie Stephen's "George Eliot." Al- 
though George Eliot could not pass 
as a "man of letters," she chose to take a man's name for 
the very homely one of Mary Ann Evans, and as to her rank 
in English letters, there is no room for doubt. This present 
life of George Eliot is a dual study, psychological and bio- 
graphical. As a work of biography, I cannot say anything 
unusual for the book, save that it is compact, apparently 
authentic, sane and strewn with convincing descriptions of 
the author and her environment, both human and natural. 
The book leaves a vivid impression of the earnest, busy 
life of the woman whose work was so deeply marked on her 
generation. 
The Macmillan Company, New York. 

A very scholarly work from the pen of 
How Colonies Professor Paul S. Reinsch of the Uni- 
are Made. versity of Wisconsin, is "Colonial Gov- 

ernment," more a thesis than a popular 
work. Professor Reinsch traces the causes of expansion, 
attributing it partly to domestic discontent, partly to am- 
bition. To the missionary also he gives his due, showing 
how the cross has been taken into savage lands and has been 
almost invariably followed by the cotton bolt and the sew- 
ing machine. "Colonial Expansion" will be useful to the 
student and interesting to the lover of sociological subjects. 
The Macmillan Company, New York. 



Carpet stores would make less money if all people 

had their carpets cleaned at Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning 
Works, 353 Tehama street. An occasional thorough clean- 
ing adds to the life of a carpet, and it cannot be done better 
than by Spaulding's modern methods. They call for and 
deliver goods and do work promptly. 



All fruits and vegetables are at Omey & Goetting's, 

s;alls 33-34-45-46 California Market, a little sooner, a little 
better and a little fresher than at other places. 



1b 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 




Wand 

^ Ofe oiy no wand but P/easure's . "^^^ 




In the words of an important New York Frohmanizer, a 
good financier and a firm believer in the discouragement of 
the American playwright and the encouragement of Mr. 
Clyde Fitch, " 'The Importance of Being Earnest' is a good 
show for a long stand." Oscar Wilde wrote "The Importance 
of Being Earnest" in the prickly heat of his wit. Wilde was 
not accountable for his moods, but there was ever a method 
in his wildness. His work has the good fortune to be litera- 
ture as well as play-acting, and nothing less than six per- 
formances will satisfy the fiend who has gotten a taste of 
his epigram. His nonsense is worthy a serious study. I 
can imagine a New York public flocking theatreward for a 
fabulous number of nights to learn the real importance of 
being foolish — and New York is frequently a jay town theat- 
rically, too. This play is one that could very easily be made 
to read better than it acts, for an epigram is an abomination 
in an unskilled mouth. It is a play of tongue-quickness, and 
San Francisco is fortunate in having, these two seasons, 
heard it read by a company so finished as Mt. Mil- 
ler's. Little can be said of this week's production that was 
not said last year, for the two performances are as like as 
two peas. Perhaps last year's pea was a bit the fresher of 
the two, but this year's pea is not a whit less sweet to the 
taste. San Francisco is getting educated, too. Last Monday's 
audience seldom laughed at the wrong place. That in itself 
is a good sign. Mr. Miller as John Worthing juggled the wit 
of his lines with a facility that made the trick look easy, and 
never once did he allow one of Wilde's delicate creations 
to slip through his fingers. M'iss Elleston as Cecily was 
as unconscious as the naive creature whom Wilde wished to 
satirize. She and Miss Waldron were especially artistic 
in the fierce battaille del dames of the second act. where 
Cecily sweetens her rival's tea as the most barbarous act 
of revenge which the conventional mind can plot or plan. 
I must qualify my commendation of the cast in Into by 
expressing my pained opinion that Mr. Cortleigh was consid- 
erable of a bull amidst Oscar Wilde's priceless china. 

* • • 
Vaudeville, like everything else theatrical, is doomed to an 
occasional slump, but this week Mr. Morrisey's programme 
is again in fighting trim. The vaudeville fiend does not 
want his evening all sentimental song, neither does he care 
about an unbroken monotony of monologue, or about six 
successive fatty-and-skinny low-comedy knock-about-and- 
kick-me-in-the-stomach stunts. Variety is the spice of vau- 
deville, and that's what the Orpheum had this week. Of 
course I couldn't approve of the "musical novelty" turn of 
the Lowe-Hughes Trio. The man who plays a harmonica 
with his nose, an organ with his toes, an accordion with his 
ankles, and goes about with "musical" instruments hang- 
ing all over him like barnacles to a stranded ship — he used 
to make me very ill when I was a boy, and I haven't gotten 
over the prejudice since. Most of the Bostonians are now on 
the Orpheum circuit, and it's a good thing, too. for the 
Orpheum circuit. Miss Bertha Walzinger, erstwhile of that 
tuneful troupe, appears this week with Mr. George C. Boni- 
face, Jr., in "The Woman Who Hesitates is Won." a para- 
doxical farce with some good situations ana a few subtleties. 
Miss Walzinger's soprano is high, but it is not over the heads 
of her audience. The Eretto family, acrobats, includes a 
really, truly new woman. After the family has amused an I 
scared you for ten minutes by their curious skull-to-skull 
gymnastics, husky Madam Eretto suddenly picks the whole 
bunch in her strong embrace and carries them off the stage. 



The hold-overs are Valerie Bergere in "Billie's First Love," 
James J. Morton, monologist, the Russells, in "The Irish 
Servant Girls," Carson & Willard. and the biograph. 

• * • 

There is more than one reason why I am glad that the 
grand opera season will soon begin at the Tivoli. One of 
them is that the comic opera contingent at that house are 
becoming visibly tired. I don't think I ever saw a more 
wooden performance than "The Serenade," as interpreted 
this week by Hartman & Co. The principals were soggy, 
and the chorus at times vulgar and insipid. It is the mis- 
fortune and not the fault of minor companies that they 
should be forced to perpetuate the fame of the Bostonians. 
I have seen Alice Nielsen as Yvonne, and the memory has 
made Annie Myers a hoyden in the same part. Of course, 
Ferris Hartman was funny, but he recited his topical para- 
graphs between yawns, and it seemed a shame not to give 
him a vacation on the moment. Mr. Webb was quaint as 
Colombo, but his efforts did not excite me to any dangerous 
pitch of merriment. Mr. Oscar Lee's tenor was keyed to 
a Grau pitch, and this voice alone seemed to have missed 
the prevailing fatigue, with the exception, perhaps, of Miss 
Frances Graham, whose songs still command admiration. 
Ah, well! the summer is waxing and Hartman & Co. de- 
serve a rest. You to the redwoods, children. 

* * * 

The chorMs "All Honor to the Tivoli" Grand Opera Season 
is now about to begin its swelling diapason throughout the 
town, for the regular season will begin on the evening of 
Monday, July 28th, with the cast so augmented that I shall 
be very much surprised if we do not enjoy the best series 
of grand operas ever put on at the Eddy Street house. 

The dramatic soprano is Ines De Frate. She is a La Scala 
graduate, having sung two seasons at that test house. P° 
sides appearing in the principal Italian cities, she has sung 
in St. Petersburg. Moscow, Vienna. Buda-Pesth. Berlin, am'. 
Paris. Her last engagement was with the company under 
the direction of Mascagni. Her voice is heavy and her star 
part Norma. She recently sung at the International Exhi- 
bition of Arts in Turin, where with Tamagno she appeared 
before the King and Queen of Italy. 

Tina De Spada is the lyric soprano. She bears the title 
of Duchess of Villa Fiorita, if you please. 

She is promised as a beautiful young woman, with a well- 
cultivated soprano voice and dramatic power, and she has re- 
cently sung in Vienna and Buda-Pesth, her engagement in 
the last named city being lengthened at the request of Car- 
men Silva. with whom she is a great favorite, the press 
agents tell me. The new contralto is Marie Pozzl. She is 
a young singer, having made her debut at an early age. Her 
voice is a contralto. She is another artist who has been 
on the recent tour with Mascagni. Collamarini will continue 
with the Tivoli. Linda Montenari, who was here last year, 
is again in good health, and will sing some of the dramatic 
roles. Pietro Venerandi will sing the robust tenor parts. 
He is but twenty-seven years of age. His voice is repre- 
sented as of great sweetness and range. Gueseppe Agos- 
tini will continue. Alfredo Zonghi is the other lyric tenor. 
He is a graduate of the Conservatory at Pesaro, founded by 
the great Rossini, and which at present is directed by Mlas- 
cagni. The dramatic baritone parts will be sung by 
Michael De Padova, who sung the part of Scarpia In La 
Tosca. under the direction of Puccini, its composer. Emilio 
D'Albore is the baritone. He has lately filled an engagement 
in Buda-Pesth. Augusto Dado was in the company last year, 
and scored in Mefistofele, Faust, La Boheme. Nabueco, and 
Aida. Pilade De Paoli is the new basso. His specialty is 
buffo parts. Anna Wilson, the young mezzo-contralto, who 
made two appearances last season with much credit, will 
be heard in many of the lighter roles. Guilio Cortes) and 
Quinto Zani are also engaged. A splendid chorus of well- 
trained voices and an enlarged orchestra will take part In 
the productions. P. C. D. 



July 19, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



Thn Columbia ThwUrp will have a Mr nor.-lty fur Um 
DenriDH with n<?tt Monday nlcht. for Mr Henry " 
nitlln and thi> special company arr to a| 
Id Um n York and London success l<y Mr H. V 

Bnaond, entitle.! Tin' Wilderness." This play baa 
f an entire season's run In London and at the I' 
ThfBtre. New York, with Miss Mnrearrt Anglin In the 
role In which she Is to appear l\. 
« • • 
Fischer's Theatre has added some new Wetn 
chorus girls, who have just arrived from the East 
will make their first appearance in the next produ 
"Hurly Burly." 

• • • 

To finish the comic opera season at the Tivoli. "The Sere- 
nade" will be repeated during the coming week. Ferris 
Hartman has a bunch of new topicals for the last week. 
m • • 

.York & Adams, who style themselves "Yours in Yiddish," 
will make their first vaudeville appearance in San Francisco 
at the Orpheum this coming week. They last appeared 
here in "The Passing Show" at the Baldwin Theatre some 
years ago. Elita Proctor Otis will make her initial appear- 
ance here in her monologue entertainment. Lew Hawkins, 
"the Chesterfield of minstrelsy." will re-appear after a two 
years' absence with new parodies and stories. Mr. A. 0. 
Duncan, the American ventriolquial comedian, is also an- 
nounced. The contrast between his own quiet demeanor and 
the roughness of the characters he gives his puppets, and 
his unmoved countenance while they talk and sing, are fea- 
tures of his skit. 

* * • 

Next week the Alcazar begins its production of "As You 
Like It." with Florence Roberts as "Rosalind" and Mr. Whit- 
tles}- as "Orlando." 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. 



Mm*. P.hkiuti*. Km.ll>*. 

Proprietor and Mftnftc.r 



Miss Edna Wallace Hopper is in the city for the purpose 
of looting the fortune of Premier Dunsmuir under a rather 
flimsy pretext. If we would believe the stories afloat about 
Mrs. Hopper's salaries we would see no particular reason 
why she should need to hold up the Premier. She does not 
disdain, however. Mrs. Dunsmuir, at the time of her death, 
agreed to set aside her claims on her husband's estate 
for the consideration of a stated sum. This ought to be as 
plain as the hand before your face. Edna, however, is 
ringing the old chestnut bell of mental incompetency, and 
is trying to gobble everything in sight. Perhaps this is an- 
other of her numerous advertising dodges. 



Mr. George W. McNear, at a meeting of the Merchants' 
Exchange this week, announced the plans for a $1,200,000 
building to occupy the spot now covered by the old building 
on California street, near Montgomery. The building will 
be twelve stories high, and will add another gem to our 
architectural revival. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat-producing qualities Briquettes are superior to 
coal. Sold by the Tesla Coal Co., 10th and Channel. 'Phone, 
South 95. 



It is a pleasure to drop into Zinkand's after the 

theatre, eat of the good things set before you there, and 
listen to the excellent music. The best people in town 
make Zinkand's their headquarters. 



The most delightfully blended whiskey known to the human 

palate is "Jesse Moor*"— the standard for over fifty years. 

. Use Hanson's Oraltne f r complexion. Removes tan, freckles. 951 Myrtle 
Street, Oakland. 

Millinery Taught. Thorough Course, Term Besinnine. Room 2 r >, 121 Post 
Street. 

English branches taught by experienced certificated public school teacher 
>4 Bush Street, 



ulna* ftt ft ■hum' Matinee HAtlirdftr .12 atmrpt 
u eek "I .inly BUI, T.*«l -•! Ihr Onlnliifl— ml. and ol the Filar Hit, 

THE SERENADE 

Monday. .Inly 18th. Opening of the Gruinl Opera SoAoon. «llh n «u- 

I'CtIi OOOipaUiy dtnot from fitly. 

First Week — "Af.iii" Uld "KlgoleUo." 

No advance In prices— 25. 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 

Or- L AI , a * n FranotaoiVi! Greatest Muslo Hall. 

rpneU m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, .Tnly 20. 

ELITA PROGTOR OTIS: York and Adams; Lew Hawkins; A. O. 
Dunoon: Honifnce and Wal/.inger. Carson and Wlllard: The Lowe 
Hughes Trio: The Blogrnph and last week ol ERETTO FAMILY. 

Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday- 
Reserved seats, 25o; Balcony 10c; overs chair* and box seats, 50o. 



Al _ _ __ «_ T" L J Bblasoo & Thall, Managers. 

icazar I neaxre. phone Aicazar. 

Beginning Monday, July 21st. 

MISS FLORENCE ROBERTS 

Supported by White Whittlesey, and the Alcazar Stock Company in 
Shakespeare's Comedy, 

MS YOU LIKE IT 

First production at the Alcazar Theater, Miss Roberts as Rosalind— 

Wh te Whittlesey <*s Orlando, Only Matinee Saturday. Seats now 

selling. 

Prices— Evenings, 15c, 25c, 85c, 50c & 75c. Matinees. 15c, 25o, 35o, 50c. 

Week July 28th— First production in this city of Franklin Fyles* new 

play, ' Drusa Wayne." 

G n l,, ,_.„ L, ' _, T* L ^ _ J. _„ GoTTiaOB. Marx & ( o 
OlUmDia I heatre. Lessees an« Managers. 

Matinees "Wednesday and 



Week Beginning Monday, July 2lst, 
Saturday. Charles Frohman presents 

HENRY MILLER 



MARGARET ANQLIN 

and a special company in the latest London and New York comedy 
success, 

THE WILDERNESS 

by H. V. Esmond, author of ''When We Were Twenty-One." 
July 28th— "The Only Way.'' 



Fischer's Theatre 

How is That! Already Four Weeks. 



POUSSE CAFE 

ANTHONY AND CLEOPATRA AND A ROYAL FAMILY- 

A 82,00 show for 25 and 50 cents, reserved at night. 25 cents Saturday 
and Sunday Matinees. Presented by a collection of Illustrious Ar- 
tists, wh*> know how to amuse, to act, Bing, and dance. You must 
oome early to secure good seats. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest -wines beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after 
the theatre Is over. 

Notice to Creditors. 

EBtate of JAMES HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HASTY, Deceased. 

No 1 ice i*i hereby given by the undersigned, JOHN FARNHAM, Admin- 
istrator of the Estate of JAMES HASTINGS, also oalled JAMES J. HASTY, 
Deceased, to the creditors of and all persons having claims against the 
said D' o a»ed, to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers, within four 
months after the first publication of this notice, to the said Administrator, 
at Room 79. Chronicle Building, the same being his place for the transac- 
tion of the business of the said estate in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California. JOHN FARNHAM. 

Administrator of the Estate of 
JAMES HASTINGS, also oalled JAMES J, HASTY, Deceased 

Dated at San Francisco, June 21, 1902. 
FRANK McGOWAN 

Attorney for Administrator. 

Rooms 75, 79 and 80 Chronicle Building. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works for the eleotion of Trustees for the ensuing year and the 
transaction of such other business as may be brought before the meeting 
will be held at the office of the company, No. 298 Steuart Street. San Fran- 
cisco, on MONDAY, the 4th day of August, 191 2, at 11 o'clock A. B. 

AUGUSTUS TAYLOR, Secretary. 

SCIENTIFIC MANIPULATION 

Mrs. A. Bilsbbough, the successful specialist, particularly in chronic 
and nervous disorders. Ladies and children only. Home treatments by 
arrangement. Office Menesinl Building, 231 Post Street. Room 12, Hours 
9 to 11. 1 to 5.80, Telephone James 2606. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 




The Automobile Club of California, 415 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Main 934. Officers: MY. F. A. 
Hyde, President; Dr. F. J. Tillman, Vice-President; MY. A. 
C. Aiken, Secretary; Mr. Byron Jackson, Treasurer. 

• * * 

Automobile Club of San Jose.— Mr. E. T. Sterling, Presi- 
dent; Mr. B. D. Merchant, Secretary; General Executive 
Committee: Messrs. Frank Coykendall. Harry Bercovich, 
Charles Chrisman, E. T. Sterling, and B. D. Merchant. 
•• * * 

Touring Committee: Mr. E. P. Brinegar, chairman; Mr. 
H. Courtney Ford, and Mr. George H. Whitney. 

• * • 

A carload of four White steam carriages has just arrived 
from the East, and been placed upon the San Francisco 
salesroom floor of the White Sewing Machine Company. 
The carriages are of the very latest style, and are beau:iful 
examples of American workmanship. This is the first ship- 
ment the San Francisco office has been able to obtain since 
last winter, the rush of orders 'in the East having stopped 

shipments to this coast. 

« • • 
Mr. Gardier of the White Sewing Machine Company took 
an automobile trip through Alameda and Contra Costa Coun- 
ties on July 4th, going by way of Haywards and San Ramon 
Valley as far as Antioch, returning by way of Walnut Creek 
and the Fish Ranch road. The run back from Walnut Creek 
over the hills to Fourteenth and Broadway. Oakland, was ac- 
complished in an hour and fifteen' minutes. 

• • * 

That the automobile has come to stay is not a matter 
of conjecture, but an established fact. They may be seen 
on all the highways throughout Europe, and all the States 
of the Union. No ride so exhilarating as a trip in an auto 
in the crisp morning air. loitering on the way to enjoy the 
scenery, or breasting the breeze with the speed of the rail- 
way train. No poorly ventilated cars, no cinders to start 
the sorrows, no tunnels or cuts to obscure the view: all is 
delightful and enchanting. The most phlegmatic or dyspep- 
tic individual becomes an enthusiast while taking a sp'n 
with this steed that tireth not. 
■ * » 

The California Automobile Company, of 346 McAllister 
street, is making some very "swell" rigs with either steam 
or gasoline for motive power. These autos have several 
new features — notably, roller instead of ball bearings; 
solid steel axles; joints such that insure complete flexibility. 
In gasoline vehicles engines are mounted on separate 
springs, preventing transmission of vibration to gear or 
passengers. Steam autos have the engine attached to angle 
Iron frame instead of wood, and are safer and more sen 
able. 



We quote the following from the Automobile and 
Motor Review of June 14th, 1902, page 4: 

Summarizing the results secured with Ice 'WHI'I E' 
"steam carriage B— 65 in the Memorial Day endurance run iis 
"steam generating system combined with the condenser made 
"possible a run of 100 miles un six gallons of water and 59 pal 
"Ions of gasoline, as against an average of 95}£ gallons ot water 
"and 13 gallons of gasoline for all other blue ribbon steam car- 
"riages and an average of fi 1 , gallons of gasoline for all blue rib- 
"bon hydro carbon vehicles." 

WHITE SEWINC MACHINE COMPANY 

300 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
C. A. Hawkins, General Atrent. 



Manila is away on the edge of the world, but already auto- 
mobile omnibuses are in operation there. 
• m ■ 

The Automobile Club of California is the pioneer club 
of its class on the Coast, and has a constantly growing 
membership. The club is making favorable public opinion 
in behalf of the automobile, and soon the antique prejudices 



Vh * locomobile 



» Company 

of tt?e pacific; 



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* \N FRANCISCO. 



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and represent the following well-known manufacturers: 

Wlnton Motor Carriage Company. Cleveland, Ohio: United States Long- 
Distance Automobile Company, New York. N. Y.: Buffalo Automobile and 
Auto-Pi. Company, Buffalo. N. Y.; Smith & Mabley, American Agents 
"Panhard— The Peuget." 

Full and Complete 7Ant of Partt and Accessories, Automobile Leather 
Clothing for Ladies and Gentlemen, tamps, French Uorne, etc. 



"LOCOMORII.KS" FOR RENT 



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SAN FRANCISCO 

Malcolm C. 
Whyte 
Co. 

Agents 



July 19. 1902. 



SAN FRANCIS l NEWS LETTER. 



13 



will bare diaappeared Thi 

fair play an. I r- .ml the publll . 

iin- ih.- vast important <■ of the motor carrii 
trial ami nomli Factor, is rapidly conceding I 

• • • 

the nanus of Lbs memben • •! the au 
Wis Club of California, principally San Francisco mi 
\. AJdrtoh, a. C. Aiken, Q s. Andres, M T I 
Charles Blanth, Sacramento B. P, Brinegar, a \ B 
II H Brown, Vlaalia; M m. Cook, E Cotton, Oa 
i v Chanalor, l>r. C. w. Card, \v. I.. Elliott, J. a. Folger, 
irtm-y Port, C. B, Qreen, C. A Hawkins. A M. Hunt. 
Hyde, T. .1. Henderson, Joseph Holle. Colonel S R 
Hamilton. Sacramento, Byron Jackson, ll. I. Jerome, r S. 
Ja. ks. Napa, Porville Llbby, Jr.. R. M. Loeser, Palo AJtO, 
K <'- Lennle, C. C Mo,, v. J. J, Moore, \-:. Mohrlg, v. M, 
Minor. E. O. M.Hain, J. S. Oyster, J. G. O'Bryan, Q. A. Pope, 
E. H. Parrish. B. J. Pope, Stockton. Dwlght Porter, S. A. 
Peckham, Sterling Postley. Belvedere. S. D. Rogers, P. F. 
Rockett, A. B. B, Ridley, Dr. Max Rothschild, K. P, Schwerin, 
B. E. Stoddard. Elgin E. Stoddard. Dr. R. W. Smith. \V. J. 
Smalo. Dr. 1". .1. Tillman. H. B. Taylor. Oakland, W. H. Tal- 
hot, H. C. Tildcn, M. J. Tansy. T. H. B. Varney, .1. M\ WSI- 
kins. D, D. Wass. C. T. Wendell. 

Applications for membership, unacted upon, from San 
Francisco: 

Geo. F. Whitney. A. R. Fredericks, M. B. Spauldiug, Mal- 
colm C. Whyte. Dr. R. A. Stapler; Wm. T. Coleman. San 
Mateo. 

* * • 

It will not be for lack of preliminary discussion if one 
or more long distance endurance tests are not held this 
fall. Gossip about long runs in contemplation comes from 
Chicago. Philadelphia, Boston and even San Francisco. 
While some of these are on their face merely nebulous dog- 
day prospects, as for instance the transcontinental run from 
ocean to ocean, which comes from Chicago, others are said 
to be advanced far enough toward realization to merit 
serious consideration. 

The most important of these is the proposed 1000-mile run 
between New York and Chicago. The Chicago Automobile 
Club will outline the project at a special meeting and invite 
the co-operation of the Automobile Club of America, the 
clubs en route at Rochester, Utica, Syracuse, Buffalo, and 
Detroit, and the National Association of Automobile Manu- 
facturers. It is probable that in the end the American 
Automobile Association may be deemed the better organiza- 
tion to manage the trip. 

American automobilists have long desired to promote 
a test in keeping with the advancement of -the industry 
in this country that would bear favorable comparison with 
the 1000-mile run of the Automobile Club of Great Britain, 
made two years ago, says the New York Herald. Hundred- 
mile runs are now considered mere day's outings. The 
New. York-Buffalo run of last year was too short to satisfy 
Americans. The projected autumn run of the Automobile 
Club of America to Boston and return will present less 
difficulties tnan the ride to Buffalo. There is no desire on 
the part of those interested in the Chicago run to interfere 
with the Boston journey, but merely to furnish an oppor- 
tunity to the owners and manufacturers who seek a severe 
test in the longer trip. 



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factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you'll save at least one-third on your fuel bill. 
'Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will receive 
prompt attention. 



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Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, and Illustrating 
Life classes. $3.00 per month. 

927 HARKET STREET, 

DR. H. d. STEWART 

Teacher of Vocal Music, Piano, Orean Harmony 
and Composition. 

Special course for Binders desirlne church 
positions. 

STUDIO: 1105 BUSH STREET 



No danger of a bad complexion if you use Camelline, 

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used and endorsed by Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, Adclina 
Patti and others. 



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810 N, FfjONT STS., GR/fND FjAPIDS, MICH- 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



I 



fr— ^ M 



"W* • •■•-■.''>.':■■■■■.'. 

JLcckerWn 



^^s^s 




Scoffers hare been loud in declaring that men like Mr. 
Henry Austin Adams, who change their religion for the sake 
of starring on the lecture platform, are working their spir- 
itual flips merely as a business graft. However this may 
be, there are gossips, malicious and otherwise, who declare 
that Mr. Adams had rather a lively scamper at the Tamal- 
pais Tavern some time last week, that be didn't lecture, but 
that he played a star part, and his support were four 
dizzy blondes and a large chorus of champagne bottles. I 
am told by these designing informants that Mr. Adams and 
his party began dining heavily during the evening, and that 
the sizz arose as the fizz went down, till the proprietors of 
the Tavern put in a most vigorous protest. Their eludings 
had about as much effect, says my misguided informant, 
as the winds whistling up the Tamalpais slopes from Mill 
Valley. The authority on lies and liars got more hilarious 
as the night wore on, and his songs arose from the moun- 
tain peaks to the stars. The proprietors knew that if they 
put Mr. Adams out he might roll into Marin county, so they 
were obliged to listen to his entertainment till the rosy 
dawn brought peace. The same biased person who told me 
this story says that he verily believes that Mr. Adams' next 
change of heart will be from Catholicism to the wine wor- 
ship of Omar. 

* * * 

Some of the princes of Tahiti were recently in town 
the guests of Miss Wells and Miss Oge, who had just re- 
turned from there, and had been entertained by the fast-ue- 
caying royal family of that place. They were utterly horri- 
fied at the suggestion that they swam in the customary bath- 
ing suits of this country on the ground that they were too 
conspicuous. When asked what kind of suits they would 
prefer, they suggested first putting on a pair of trowsers, and 
over them a red and black striped sack, enveloping the 
entire body. Thus they hoped not to attract attention. 

* * * 

It is said that all is not peace in the Miller Company, and 
Margaret Anglin especially is bitter against Mr. Miller, who 
has taken to forming himself upon the prince of tyrants. 
Mr. Richard M'ansfield. It is said that even the supers re- 
sent Mr. Miller's dictatorship. However, this personal feel- 
ing in no way mars the performances. Miss Anglin wishes 
to play Camille, and Mr. Miller has a desire to play Armand, 
and so before they leave they are to give one production 
of the piece for which Miss Anglin has fifteen hundred dol- 
lars worth of gowns. It will be interesting to see what sort 
of an impersonation Miss Anglin, the most conventional and 
cominr il faut of actresses will give to the greatest comtti 
of the stage. 

* * * 

The friends of Mr. Charles S. Wheeler of Berkeley an 
regarding the evening-clad legs of that gentleman with an 
earnestness that is almost tragic. Now. if there is any- 
thing in the world upon which Mr. Wheeler especially prides 
himself, it is the grace and symmetry of his running gear, 
so why should his neighbors of Berkeley stare when he 
goeth abroad in the evening? A fortnight or so past. Mr. 
WJheeler had a new evening suit made. He was going to 
christen it at a banquet, and on the evening of its arrival 
he put it on for a dress rehearsal. To his horror he noticed 
that the tailor had made an error in his estimates, and had 
cut the trowsers about a foot too long. Like Caesar, or 
Haroud Alraschid, or some other historical person I have 
read about, Mr. Wheeler believes that there is virtue in wise 



counsel, so he called his wife and sister into his presence 
and asked them what should be done. All agreed that the 
garment was too long, but no one seemed to know how it 
could be made shorter in the space of time allowed. The 
banquet was the next night, and no self-respecting tailor will 
take a stitch inside of forty-eight hours. "I am afraid to 
cut them off," said Mrs. Wheeler. "You can't do a neat job," 
agreed her sister-in-law. So the household retired in despair 
that night, and the trowsers were left disconsolately dang- 
ling their unnecessary length over a chair. About midnight 
a night clad figure stole into the presence of the trowsers. 
It was Mr. Wheeler's loving sister, who could not sleep 
for thinking of her brother's predicament. With shears she 
cut off twelve inches at the bottom; with thread and needle 
she hemmed them round, then leaving them where she found 
them, she turned off the gas and retired in peace. About 
three o'clock the next morning the trowsers again received 
a ghostly call. This time Mrs. Wheeler had the insomnia. 
Again the work basket was taken down, again were the 
offending trousers amputated twelve inches on either limb, 
again was the gas turned out, and the trowsers left to 
mournful darkness. 

ihat's why Mr. Wheeler's friends are expecting him to 
emulate Ambassador Whitelaw Reid and wear knee breeches 
underneath his spike-tail. 

* * * 

Mr. Emil Bruguiere has been writing music for "Mother 
Earth," the Mexican play produced at the Alcazar a few 
years ago. Mr. Powers wrote "The First Born," a wonder- 
ful success, and started the craze for Japanese plays. His 
Greek play was a failure, but "M'other Earth" was very 
beautifully poetical, with genuine artistic feeling. Mr. Bru- 
guiere, who has written several songs, has been engaged 
for about a year on the construction of an opera for the 
words. For that reason he took a house at Monterey. He 
and his friend, Mr. Allen Wallace, go East within a few 
months. If the opera is successful he will be gone about 
a year, and then it is said upon very good authority he 
will return and marry Miss Vesta Shortridge, the daughter 
of Mr. Charles Shortridge. 

* * * 

I should hate to be perfect. If I were it would make me 
very uncomfortable to dwell upon the faults and foibles of 
others. Therefore I don't hesitate to publish the following 
communication, which came to me from Yerba Buena last 
Monday: 

"Dear Sir: In your issue of July 12th. on page 14, is printed 
an article in which you give an explanation of the use 
'three parallel lines encircling the steep southern flank of 
Goat Island' are put to. The explanation of your 'Looker On' 
is very quaint and ingenious, but is not based on fact. 
The paths referred to are not, and never have been used 
for purposes of discipline. The lowest of the three paths 



Prominent Physicians Ihe'"""^,"": 1 , 1 '; 



/ETNA 



MINERAL 
WATER 



Bottled at Aetna Springs, Napa Co., CaL 



] ( >r- Cbns. R. Blake, 425 Kearny street, City, writes: 
" I have used several of the many mineral water* now on the nuir- 
ket, and 1 must say that E think A<Zim\ stands -without a peer, Il if* 
especially fine a' a table water. I always lake pleasure In recom- 
mending it to my patients." 



Phone 
South 51 



AND 
ORDER 
A CASE. 



/ETNA MINERAL WATER CO. 

7 TENTH ST., 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



July I*, 1902. 



SAN FRANCE O NEWS LETTER. 



16 



marina rum Inly Is to prarent uu 

ns lamllng mi the Island. Tlir second and 
third paths aro nn> bracks.' IV 

m la 
rth of property .>n ih,- Island, an unchecked Hn 

li a small area, nilttht prori liv. H 

1 the paths to which you retei «■ inatro I 

fur the fnrlher ronvoiiii'iHc of future Bra light) 
Yours very truly. 

ONE OF THE GOATS." 

• • • 
•aln Von Helms, who has recently been appoint 
a rat-am-)- in the Pilot Service of this port, is a man i I strong 
principles, as well as exceptional attainments In his profea 
■ion, which render him peculiarly adapted for the respon- 
sible position he Is now called upon to fill. A story is going 
the rounds anent his new appointment, illustrative of a fori e 
of character which within the year cost him a lucrative 
position. For many years he has held command in a local 
steamship employ, winning the confidence and respect of all 
who hal the good fortune to sail under his charge. Within 
the past few months the managers of this company issued 
an order that all the masters of its vessels should sign a 
pledge that they would neither carry any liquor nor drink 
a social glass on board their ship in port or at sea. It was 
a case of sign or resign, and a certain date was fixed as a 
limit for obedience to the rule. All the commanders in the 
fleet wheeled into line with the exception of Von Helms, and 
his delinquency being noted, the company, allowing for an 
apparent obstinacy of a man whose reputation was beyond 
reproach, wishing to give him another chance, reiterated 
the order and set the date of compliance still farther ahead. 
But still there was no response from the sturdy captain. 
Finally the edict went forto, and Von Helms retired from 
command. As a matter of fact, Von Helms has never 
touched spirituous liquors in any form, and does not even 
smoke. 



San Francisco's bright little sporting weekly, "Pastime," 
has gone out of existence, but out of it will grow a monthly, 
"Western Field," the corporate owners of which have 
bought out the interests of the weekly. The monthly 
should succeed in so good a field. 



The recent appearance of the New England Conservatory 
Year Book, in new and attractive form, shows extension and 
elaboration in all departments of this great musical institu- 
tion. The most progressive step that has been taken during 
the school year just closed has been the establishment 
of a School of Opera, as one of the departments of the 
Conservatory. The orchestral department has grown stead- 
ily under the baton of Director Chadwick. In the coming 
autumn, September 18th, the Conservatory will establish 
itself in its new home on Huntington avenue, the most 
magnificent conservatory Building in the world, designed es- 
pecially for its use. The faculty list of the Conservatory 
has been materially increased. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy, 
cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

Dr. Wllley's Medical Discovery. 
Is the King of Pain and Balm of Gilead that has cured thou- 
sands of people. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper ft Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 



CRA1Q BROS.: 120 Sutter Street, San Francisco. 

IMPORTERS OF 

Scotch Tweeds 

AND FINE WOOLENS 

Suits $30 and up, Telephone Davis, 910 



Pears' 

To keep the skin clean 
is to wash the execretions 
from it off ; the skin takes 
care of itself inside, if not 
blocked outside. 

To wash it often and 
clean, without doing any 
sort of violence to it re- 
quires a most gentle soap, 
a soap with no free alkali 
in it. 

Pears', the soap that 
clears but not excoriates. 

Sold all over the world. 



Founded 
1876. 



Trinity School 

A Day School for Young Gentlemen 
2203 CFNTP.AL AVENUE, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Preparatory depa*tment for younger boys under the supervision of a 
lady. Grammar and high school department*! under gentlemen teachers. 
University graduates. Accredited to the universiliea. 



Phone Steiner 4550. 



LYON Sc ROGER, Principals. 



PERALTA HALL 

School for boys. Berkeley, Cal Next 
term opens July 28th. 

Phone Mason 1387, 
FRANCIS DUNN, Principal. 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

[.(Successor to Sanders Jk Johnson.) 

TAILOR 

Phelan Bldg. Tel. Main 5387 San Francisco, Gal. 



The "CLAN HACKENZIE" 
7 Years Old 

Scotch Whisky 

Leader in Glasgow Exhibition 1901. Suppled to the largest slipping 
companies and hotels. " Is in great demiu.d for High-Balls." 

G. R. MACKENZIE, . 

GLASGOW LONDON LIVERPOOL 

FORBES BROS., AGENTS. 307 SANSOME STREET 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



Ml 




own \~rier 



"Hear the Crier}* h/h&t the devil art thou 
' One tha t wilt play the devil t j/r, with you ' 




Fake, fake, fake — 

O city by the sea! — 
And I would that my tongue could utter 

The thoughts that arise in me. 
Ah, well that the Jeffries boy 

Rehearses the forthcoming play, 
Ah, well that Fitzsimmons, too, 

Goes over his lines every day! 
And the stately bets go on 

In the poolroom under the hill, 
And oh, that the foolkiller mignt arrive 

While the tickets are selling still! 

Fake, fake, fake, 

In this pug-town by the sea, 
But the plausible fakers who run this fight 

Will never get rich on me. 

Parblieu!! It is for to be ashamed of! Who can be the 
thoughtless, sacriligious, cold-blooded thief who entered with- 
out knocking le chambre de M. Dallemagne, French Consul 
to San Francisco, and stole away his crosses, his medallions. 
his ribbons, his medals of honor, his bangles, and his am- 
bassadorial hardware? Such a carelessness of authority! 
Such a contempt of dignity! It is not the loss of jewels 
that angers and mortifies M'. Dallemagne. It is the absence 
of the medals, medallions, ribbons, etc., that drives him to 
distraction. Pouf! They are gone, disappeared, and M. 
Dallemagne is only half a French Consul. Whoever heard 
of an embassador of France appearing without his medals? 
As soon think of Mr. John Philip Sousa's standing before 
his band with chest undecorated. If the thief had stolen M. 
Dallemagne's shoes or his trousers, the deed might have 
been forgiven, for one can imagine a French official going 
abroad in sandals and a cotton sheet. But to appear without 
medals — that would be indecent. 

The question before the good citizens of Alameda is: 
How long should a small boy be beaten in order to obtain 
the best results? Edward Roemer, who is an expert lam- 
baster, thinks that nine minutes with a yard of cable is 
about the right limit, hut unfortunately his neighbors and 
the Court think otherwise. His son, C.eorgie, has fallen 
into the pernicious habit of running away from home, but 
that would have been all right had he not fallen into the 
more pernicious habit of returning. It seems strange that 
with such a kindly father he should have eared to roam 
abroad, but such is the perversity of youth! To make his 
son's return welcome, Roemer. Sr., did not slay the fatted 
calf. He cut the knotted rope and proceeded to raise 
all over the back of Roemer, Jr. The old gentleman is a 
firm believer in corporal punishment— doubtless he will be 
willing to bare his own back and receive a liberal welting 
at the hands of his loving neighbors. 

Samuel North, an Austrian designer employed in a local 
cloak house, has brought suit for divorce against bis wife, 
Rosie. It seems that when Sam was fourteen and Rosie was 
twenty-seven, she took advantage of his tender years and 
lured him into marrying her. No sooner were they wed than 
the matronly Rosie began to "pick upon the likes of 
with the intention, no doubt, of making him her equal in 
the sorrows of life, if not in years. I think, after all, that 
Rosie, not Sam, was the designer. 



Among the undesirable people whom our connection with 
the Philippines has brought to this city are several firms 
of unscrupulous pension attorneys. They send agents, worth- 
less ex-soldiers for the most part, to meet all returning 
discharged soldiers and importune mem to apply for pen- 
sions, whether they have grounds or not. These agents 
button hole the veteran, and tell him how easy it is to get 
a pension. They enlarge glibly on the prospect of getting 
something for nothing. They tell him that it is his right, 
something that he has earned, and in nine cases out of ten 
they win over the soldier and earn their dollar fee. Wow, 
when a man has lost a limb or has become so broken down 
in'health while in the service that it is impossible for him to 
earn a living, it is only just that he should be looked after. 
But it strikes me that the Government is entirely too gener- 
ous and lacking discrimination in regard to the matter of 
pensions, especially for service in these two comic opera 
wars. The barrack room is not a good school for ambition 
and industry, and the average ex-soldier, given ten or twelve 
dollars a month, will not exert himself. Indiscriminate 
gi anting of pensions is unfair to the tax-payers and has 
a decided tendency to swell the number of the hobo army. 
and, heaven knows, that is large enough already. Should 
there not be some way of restraining these lawyer sharks 
from tempting our soldier men to sell their manhood? 

Musolinu. an Italian brigand, of murderous fame which 
out-Herods that of Vasquez. Murietta, and all other Western 
banditti, rolled into one. has just been convicted at Lucca 
on all the indictments against him, and sentenced to life 
imprisonment, with eight years soli.ary confinement. This, 
owing to the severity of Italian imprisonment, is equivalent 
to a death sentence. He has appealed from this judgment, 
and has begged a member of Parliament to intercede on 
his behalf with the King. "I will promise," he said, "never 
to kill another person, and I will swear to leave the country 
and seek my fortune in America, the home of liberty and 
justice." It is to be hoped the King, in friendship to this 
country, will see that this human tiger is cajed so securely 
that he will never get a chance to carry his designs into 
effect. There are enough unhanged murderers now stalk- 
ing about in this asylum for foreign criminals, without 
such an unwelcome addition in the person of Musolino. 

Consul-General Ho Yow, when he leaves the port of San 
Francisco, will probably take with him a justly established 
belief that the white devil is an imported ass. This great 
light probably first dawned upon him when he saw the city 
lay down to labor demagogy and the State's best interests 
sacrificed at the altar of Chinese exclusion. He is prob- 
ably wondering what is the difference between keeping a 
missionary out of China with a blunderbuss and prohibit- 
ing the Chinese from America with a law. Also he will 
probably smile at the San Francisco daily paper and Its 
cooked up lie about the manner of his recall to China. Mr. 
Ho Yow has administered the laws in Chinatown with the 
skill of a diplomat and the deportment of a gentleman. San 
Francisco may be happy if his successor is his equal. Mr. 
Wu and Mr. Ho may clasp hands in the Flowery Kingdom, 
inl agree "Melliean heap dam fool." 

A Wisconsin hypnotist threw a boy into a trance and set 
him to search for his missing father. The boy found the 
old man's skull under a trash pile. Somebody might be hyp- 
notised into finding who murdered Nora Fuller, thus re- 
viving a case that has now gone quite out of style. 

I am told that San Francisco is likely to be chosen as the 
scene of the next conclave of the Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians. I'm sure I don't know whether this is intended as a 
compliment to San Francisco, or merely as a threat. 

James J. Jeffries has developed a cancer under his tongue, 
thus contributing his mite toward making the world better 
and happier. 



July 19. 1902. 



SAN FRA: 1 . SCO NEWS LETTER. 



1? 



A Prince's Banking Experlnce 



By Harry Raymond Calhan. 

Prince Ben Ah, the despotli rulOt o( Aszni. one ol Iho 
many small barbaric principalities of Africa, was in I 

ful ra 

The royal treasury, which contained one hundred thousand 
paleos, a sum equal to probably fifty thousand dee 
our currency, had for a long period been Bubjei i 
depredations of some person, familiar with the Interior of 
the palace. 

The culprit, if caught, would certainly be beheaded with 
ureal dispatch, and. as a stric t watch was now kept upon the 
golden eoin. the depredations had, for a time at least, 
ceased. 

However, upon the morning on which this narrative 
opens, the prince, at best of a quarrelsome disposition, had 
worked himself into a terrible passion. The very thought 
that any of his subjects should take liberties such as these 
was maddening to him and in the bottom of bis heart he 
knew that not even the men now on watch could be trusted. 
When in the humor they would very likely appropriate a 
portion of the treasure and then cast the blame upon some 
poor, innocent person, who would be executed upon their 
word. 

The more he thought of the subject, the greater became 
the rage of Prince Ben Ali. he cursed the people, he cursed 
anything and everything. At last, having exhausted his 
vocabulary of curses, he threw himself upon a rug and 
gave himself up to calmer thoughts. 

An inspiration seized him and summoning his Prime Min- 
ister he gave that individual the details of the scheme that 
had just entered his mind. Then being dismissed, the Min- 
ister left, the palace for the purpose of at once carrying the 
plan to a conclusion. 

In the palace grounds, almost immediately opposite that 
edifice, there was an artificial lake of considerable size. 
This was stocked with crocodiles, a number of which were 
the largest for miles thereabouts. During the great festival 
occasions, held once every year, many persons were offered 
as sacrifices and the bodies then thrown to these monsters. 

Preceded by slaves, bearing between them the heavy 
chest containing the royal wealth, the Prime Minister pro- 
ceeded to this lake. Embarking upon one of the several 
boats there found, the party rowed for some distance, until 
halted by the Minister. Now, the slaves having charge of 
the chest were ordered to throw it overboard. There was 
a tremendous splash, the water was violently agitated and 
several crocodiles, which had been following at a short dis- 
tance, retired in haste. 

The Prince, upon being informed of the successful ac- 
complishment of the plan, expressed great satisfaction, ex- 
claiming, "At last we have found a safe resting-place for our 
gold. Those crocodiles will keep an honest watch and no 
one can possibly bribe them." 

AH went smoothly for some time, until one day, in an 
emergency, the Prince found himself in need of a sum of 
money for Government purposes. He was about to order 
the sum extracted from the treasury, when a horrible thought 
entered his mind. His scheme for disposing of the money 
of the realm had contained no provision for its withdrawal, 
even by the Government, and Prince Ben Ali found himself 
as unable to extract the treasure from its hiding-place as 
was his most humble subject. Consternation seized upon 
the monarch. He raged with wrath, then succumbed to 
despair, tore his royal robes and acted as one demented. 

At this moment the Prime Minister entered the palace 
and, upon being acquainted with the state of affairs, sought 
a relief from the calamity. But one solution of the problem 
presented itself. That was to drain the lake of its water, 



afterwards forcing the 'i Hies from \<; bed and then 

This work was with great difficulty, accompli 

■■us borne to Its former position win, in the 
palace and then was opened In order to extract tie 
coin, \.- the cover was raised the Prince leaned forward 
gold. His band touched nothing— the chest 
was empty! With a cry of anguish he tottered to hi 
ami staggered from the room, the monarch of a ruined 
■ ountry. 

****** 

When the treasure chest had been deposited in the 
crocodile-guarded treasury the thieving incur. svhosi 

had caused the trouble, was at first, downhearted, as he be- 
lieved the money out of his grasp forever. 

One day not long thereafter, however, he heard thai ;m 
English traveler, then in that vicinity, had a sort of divining 
rod, with which could be located any precious metals, such 
as gold, silver, etc. A portion of the coin before extracted 
from the treasury made him the possessor of this instru- 
ment. 

Upon a pitchy dark night the would-be thief procured a 
boat and taking grappling hooks rowed out upon the lake. 
Back and forth he rowed, until at last the little instrument 
indicated the exact resting place of the gold. Soon the 
grappling hooks were attached and at last, after much effort, 
the heavy burden was drawn into the boat. The coin was 
soon reposing in several stout canvas sacks, while the chest 
which was a strongly made, cumbrous affair, of consider- 
able weight even when empty, was dropped over the side. 
Immediately this was done the bow of the boat was turned 
sborewards. 

Here in readiness were three of those patient beasts of 
burden, the donkey. To transfer the gold from the boat 
to the donkey occupied but a short time and then the thief 
turned his back upon his native city. 

A journey of several weeks found him in Cairo, the Cap- 
ital of Egypt, where, with his ill-gotten wealth, he estab- 
lisher himself in business. Let us hope that ere now he has 
received the punishment w'hich his crime merits. 



Baby's Diary. 

A unique and handsome publication wberein to record the 
important events in baby's life, has just been issued by 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co., 71 Hudson street, New l'ork. 
It is not given away, but is sent on receipt of 10 cents. 



Society people drop into Techau Tavern after the 

theatre. It is the place par excellence, and the good music 
furnished every evening is a great attraction. 




that ari^Bi 

%h££B%8ttttfete the most 
refreshing and satisfying drinK 
on earth! 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 




Another Mining Wonder 
on Paper. 



Charles Austin Bates, an adver- 
tising solicitor o£ New York, 
has branched out as a mining 
promoter, and the circular he 
has just issued of what he is pleased to call the King Solo- 
mon mine of Calaveras County, in this State, is a gem in its 
way. As a special favor to the friends of the promoter, those 
who are honored with one of these circulars can get wnat 
they desire of the $5,000,000 capital stock at 10 cents a share. 
Ordinary folks who do not get circulars will have to pay 
20 cents per share. This circular itself is the funniest thing 
of the kind to crop up in the past twenty years. It is worth 
framing. Anyone would think that some professional con- 
eoctor of display ads. for a dry goods store or a quack nos- 
trum had tried his hand at a whoop-up for a lot of Bruma- 
gem wares in hysterical jerky paragraphs. The narrative 
opens with the declaration in bold-faced type by C. A. B. 
"that the proposition herein was good enough to make me 
take a 6,000 mile journey in June, and is worth reading 
about." There is no doubt it is worth reading about, as 
an exhibition of the length some people will go to make a 
dollar or two. It really is not necessary for C. A. B. to tell 
people he is not a mining expert, for all his glib talk about 
methods of ore treatment in the Transvaal, and the charac- 
ter of ores in the Homestake and Mercur mines. Not being 
an expert, what right has he. then, to make such bald asser- 
tions that "there is ore in sight and blocked out to justify 
the immediate erection of a 100-ton plant," and that 500 
feet more of tunneling will show that a 1000-ton plant is 
advisable. In the next breath he says: "I know there is ore 
enough to run a 200-ton plant and pay dividends of 30 per 
cent on the investment of 30 per cent." A confession of 
faith follows: "I believe that a 1000-ton plant will be justified 
and that it will pay 150 per cent a year for fifty years at 
least. The element of gambling enters into it only as to 
the amount of profit, not as to certainty." 

He tl jsires his friends on the 10-cent 

Quartz Mineral limit to have the fact impressed upon 

by the Acre. them that he is not guessing about this, 

but is telling simply what "I absolutely 
and positively know to be the facts." Listen to this: "If you 
could go all through the mines and see the thorough way 
in which the assays and tests have been made in the com- 
pany's assay office right on the ground (where else would 
it be? under the ground?) you would realize just how far 
removed from guess-work the whole proposition is. This 
is the scientific mining that has replaced the old-time placer 
prospectors. The assay outfit on the property cost about 
$1,000, and is in the charge of two mining engineers of large 
experience, who worked three months to get the results I 
have seen and checked." According to this interesting pro- 
moter who, knowing so much, is not. a mining expert, but 
who knows honest men when he sees them, according to his 
own admission, this property is near Valley Springs. "It 
comprises 120 acres," he says, "only 40 of which have been 
developed. There is a certainty of an ore body 1.320 feet 
long and 60 feet wide. It has been developed to a depth of 
40 feet. It is not known how much deeper it is. nor if the 
ore is richer or poorer below the present workings, but ac- 
cording to the Geological Department at Washington, the 
deposit is probably 800 to 1,000 feet deep, and so far, the 
deeper the working the richer the ore assays. The average 
value shown by assays, taken all over the present workings, 
is $3.10 per ton, and this excludes all assays of $5 per ton 
and over, and these run up as high as $15." 



"It will cost 75 cents to $1 per ton 

Some Novelties to mine and mill and treat our ore, 

Mine Development. showing a minimum net profit of 

$2.10 for every ton of ore handled. 
The ore is in the form of talc with streaks of broken-up 
quartz, both talc and quartz carrying free gold. It is of 
about the consistency of brick clay, but is stratified. No 
blasting is necessary. The mine is like a quarry." In an- 
other- place he speaks about roaming "through 1200 to 1500 
feet of tunnels and cross-cuts with my own mining en- 
gineer." A rather queer condition for a quarry being worked 
by the acre. Mr. Bates is satisfied that he has "got right 
in Calaveras County one of the most remarkable mining 
properties in this county, if not in the world." and viewed 
from his standpoint it undoubtedly is. The most remarkable 
point, however, about it is its obscurity until this enterpris- 
ing New Yorker took his 6000 mile trip to kick over the 
bushel under which its effulgence has been hidden so long. 
As a novelty, we commend it to the charitable scrutiny of 
State Mineralogist Aubury, chief of the California State 
.Mining Bureau. The men who stand sponsor for this min- 
ing wonder of the century are Mr. Perry S. Heath. ex-First 
Assistant Postmaster General; Col. E. Frisbie Phelps, ex- 
President Cov.-M'utual Fire Insurance Company; Hon. Josiah 
Quincy, ex-Mayor of Boston; ex-United States Senator Mc- 
Donald, and two New York brokers. Our advice to the highly 
favored recipients of this extraordinary lkerary effusion is 
to keep their dimes in their pockets. 

While for the first time official no- 

The Nitre Deposits tice has been taken of the extent 

of California. of the nitre deposits of Southern 

California, the effort in some quar- 
ters to make out that the knowledge of their existence is 
new, can only be regarded as an exhibition of crass ignor- 
ance. For the past twenty years the attention of capitalists 
in this city has time and again been directed to the beds 
in the hope that they would have enterprise enough to ex- 
plore and develop them, but as usual with no success. 
Even the leading powder companies could not find heart 
enough to supply the capital necessary to exploit the depos- 
its and prove their value. Possibly now that the State 
Mineralogist has in a large measure confirmed the exist- 
ence of this valuable product, Eastern capital will be forth- 
coming to develop the beds and put the California material 
on the market in competition with that from Chili. For 
years past the News Letter has urged that this work be 
taken up, but like oil. which has been known to exist in 
quantity for nearly half a century, the lack of enterprise 
upon the part of wealthy residents relayed the commence- 
ment of operations on one of the most valuable of our natu- 
ral resources. There are few of the leading powder makers 
of this city who could not tell of the times innumerable they 
have turned down these very same deposits, now branded 
as new, if they chose to speak out. 

The long-expected assessment of $10 per 
The Local share on Oceanic has at last materialized. 
Stock Market. This is about the only feature of the 
market for local stocks and bonds. Busi- 
ness has been quiet to the point of dullness, with few 
changes in prices, which have been steady as a rule. The 
announcement is made that the Spring Valley Company has 
laid its second pipe line from Niles Canyon reservoir to 
the Belmont pumping works. This will double the supply 
of the company from this quarter, the capacity of the new- 
pipe line being in the neighborhood of 15.000.000 gallons per 
day. Bonds are in good demand as usual. Bay Counties 
Power has declared a dividend of 20 cents per share. 
The regular monthly dividends were paid on the 15th 
inst by local corporations. On the same date quarterly divi- 
dends were paid as follows: Bank of California, $4 per share: 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co., $1.50; and Pacific 
States Telephone and Telegraph Company. $1.50. Other dlvl- 



July 19, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



It 



Jemls paii! ' ).<> Included a semiannual at tl> 

la Notional Hank of 
ami n rt'Riilnr aeml annual dlTldend .>f 
with an extra dlrldend of I per cent, b] \\ ■ 
Thf laltf-r shows n .:• com para 

ara dividend of ; per cent paw December II, 1901, 
for six months then ended. 

While priri's show no material 
The Pine-St. Market, ptwiatlon business in Ihc I 

shares was never duller than it 
has been for weeks past. No one aeema to take any particu- 
lar interest in the market, and yet few shares are sold on 
account of outside holders. This shows that faith in the 
situation Is as strong as ever, which argues a belief In possi- 
bilities for the future. Both Ophir and Con.-Cal.-Vlrglnla 
are producing a quantity of fair-grade ore, and the storks 
are cheap at quotations when the showing in the mil 
considered. However, the mines for the time being do not 
cut much of a figure in the matter of influencing prices, and 
as far as speculation is concerned it is a waiting game all 
around. 



The annual meeting of the Security Savings Bank was held 
on Monday last, when the old Board of Directors was re- 
elected as follows: Mr. William Babcock, president; Mr. S. 
L. Abbott, Jr., vice-president; Mr. O. D. Baldwin, Mr. Adam 
Grant. Mr. R. H. Pease, Mr. H. H. Hewlett, Mr. E. J. McCut- 
chen, Mr. William Alvord, and Mr. L. F. Monteagle, direc- 
tors. Mr. Fred W. Ray was re-elected secretary, and Mr. 
Sidney V. Smith attorney. 



Mr. John B. Doyle has been appointed cashier of the Cali- 
fornia Northwestern Railroad, to succeed George C. Hickox, 
deceased. 



Taylor, Cutting & Co., one of the leading financial firms of 
Wall street, New York, has just issued a card announcing 
that Mr. A. H. Rutherford has been admitted into partner- 
ship. Mr. Rutherford, who is a stepson of Mr. George 
Crocker, has been a member of the New York Stock Ex- 
change for some time past. He is well known in this city, 
where the news of his connection with this influential firm 
has been the subject of much congratulation. 

Transactions on the Producers' Oil Exchange from July 
8th to July 14th: 



STOCKS. SHARKS 

SOI.T> 

Bear Flat: 5' 

Home 2.160 

Independence ■ ■ TOO 

Junction 1.400 

Monarch of Arizona 2,40) 

Monte Criato 50 

O. W. Va 6110 

Petroleum Center 1J.00 

Soverien 800 

San Joaquin O. & D. Co 100 

Sterling 1,600 

Thirty Three 50 

811,160 



RANGE OF 
PRICKS 
6 @ 

3 15 @ 3 03 
7 @ 
20 @ 21 
15 @ 16 

1 21V,® 
15 'S 16 



25 

7 25 
1 45 
7 



GROSS 

SALHS 

30 

7 020 

7 

2 3 

377 

6.3 

05 

15 

@ 26 201 

@ - 7'-'5 

@ 1 52% 2 2P0 
@ . . 350 



A good sound investment for capital is in La Zacualpa 
Rubber Plantation Company, o£ 713 Market street. This 
company represents vast tracts of rubber trees, the harvest 
of which will net 25 per cent per annum of the money in- 
vested. The company is in such good standing that the value 
of the stock is increasing yearly, and the investors ought to 
realize handsomely. At the end of five years the profits on 
both installment and interest bearing cash shares will be 
derived from the proceeds of the rubber crop. We know of 
no safer means of profit than this investment. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" 
extracting. 



for painless teeth 



> <> HUaaoa. I'm.. I 
r»..« Rieuu, i.i 

Vto.-1'rr-Mr 



*iir of 

I'arke A I jut Co. 



• l.lpnl. O 
I radon Fd"r.Vlnrtol>01ir 



HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE 

21 AND 23 FREMONT STREET. 

/lining Hachinery 3 



nd 

Supplied 



Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Potosi Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, Sun Francisco. California. Lo- 
cation of wo k« — Btorey County. Nevada. 

Notice ts hereby given thai at a meeting of tin- Board of Directors, held 
on the 26th day of June, 1902, an as*eH-ment (No t3) of five (5) cents per share 
wan levied upon the capital stock of the coiporatlon, pa> able Immediately 
In United States gold coin, to ti e Secretary, at the office of the company, 
room 79. Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco. Califor- 
nia. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 31st DAY OF JULY. 1902. 
will be deemed delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and 
unless payment Is made before, will be sold on Thursday, the 2Ut day 
of August, 1902, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Director*. 

CHAS. E, ELLIOTT. Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Chollar Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works — Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directory, held on 
the 2)th day of June, 1902, an assessment, (No. r>j) of five (5) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, paya- 
ble immediately In United "tates cold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 79 Nevada Block, No- 309 Montgomery street, 
San Franoisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
24th DAY OF JULY, 1902, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless pay- 
ment Is made before, will be sold on THUKSDAY, the 14th day of August, 
1902. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the oust of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 3 )9 Montgomery street San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location of ■ 
Works— Gold Hill, Storey County. Nevada. 

Notice I* hereby given that, at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 17th day of June, 19 2 an assessment (No. 86) of five (5) cents 
per share was levied upon the-capilal stock of the Corporation, rayable 
immediately, in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of 
the Company, room 35, third floor. Mills Building, corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streets, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 22nd DAY OF JULY. 1902, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the 12th day of 
August, 1902, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS. JR., Secretary- 

Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills BuildiDg, cor. Bush and Montgomery 
streets, San Franoisco. Cal- 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 126 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied May 26, 1902 

Delinquent in office July 1, 1902 

Day of sale of delinquent stock July 21, 19u2 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary,. 
Office— Room 14, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Franoisoo 
California. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT 
&TOWNE 



Dealers 
in 



TELEPHONE MAIN 199 



PAPER 



55-57-59-61 First Street, San 



Franoisco. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne, Los Angeles, Cal 
Blake, MoFall & Co., Portland, Or. 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS, 



Vi nisky— 

More whisky— 

"Jesse Moore" Whisky— the best. 



THE AWARD AT 
CHICAGO, 1893. 

"GRAND PRIX" PARIS. 1900. THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 

AWARD. These pens are ' the beBt in the world," 

Sole agent for the United Sta eB. 

Mr. Henry Hoe, 91 John Street New York. 

Sold by all stationers. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 




Ttpser 




WHEN LOVE PASSED BY. 

{( harlult ' ecker in Tu» n mid Coun'ry.} 

When Love passed by I (lid not know 
He might not come again, and so 
I made no answer to his plea, 
But laughed away his sympathy, 
Ami scorned the gifts he would bestow. 
Then up the path I saw him go. 
Came dull-eyed Sorrow, climbing slow — 
She stayed to keep me company — 
When Love passed by. 

Each year joy's crimson roses blow 
To set Love's pleasance all aglow 
For them who welcomed fair, as he 
Laid down his spoil. Alas! tor me 
\\ hite asphodels alone would grow 
When Love passed by. 
STAR-SONG. 
(Robert Undeiwood J-'hnson In lUrpei's Vae zi e 1 
When sunset flows into golden glows 

And the breath of the night is new, 
Love, find afar yon yearning star — 

That is my thought of you. 

And when your eye doth scan the sky 

Your lonely lattice through. 
Choose anyone, from sun to sun — 

That is my thought of you. 

And when you wake at the morning's break 

To rival rose and dew. 
The star that stays in the leaping rays — 

That is my thought of you. 



A RIVER PASlORAL. 
(Cli ,ton S^ullHid in L'ppflncolt'p. 

It was a random rhymer. 

Blythe-hearted as the May, 
Who plucked the flowering climber 
Along the river-way; 
It was the ferryman's daughter. 

With gypsy rose and tan, 
Who ferried o'er the water 

This straying minstrel-man. 

Her hair had purple tintings 

Above her sea shell ear; 
Her eyes had starry glintings; 

Her laugh was lyric-clear. 
He listened and he lingered — 

(His tryst was one with Fate! I 
Till eve, the fairy-fingered, 

Had shut day's sunset gate. 

Thus oft they met thereafter, 

At last no more to part, 
For Love (or was it laughter?) 

Had snared the rhymer's heart. 
And now, upon life's ocean 

The twain together float; 
He's captain — that's his notion! 

But still she stears the boat ! 



THE GODS. 

(Ada Foster Murray in the AllunUc Month! .) 

Are these the glad young deities we knew 
Long, long ago in the world's dawning day — 
These pallid shapes that wander here astray 

In the gray vapors and the glimmering dew? 

Where are the forms of satyr, nymph, and fay, 
The flash of wings in the descending blue, 
Tne wild enchantments that about us grew 

When first we heard the pipes of Pan aplay? 

Sullied with time, its mildew and its moil, 
O gods immortal, crouching here so cold, 
Age hath around you drawn her tightening coil. 

But we are young; the far quest finds us bold 
For fresh endeavor and more glorious spoil. 
Alas! alas! how grew the gods so old? 



BANKING. 
London and San Francisco Bank, uum«d 

424 CALIFORNIA STREET. 
HEAD OFFICE— 55 Old Broad street, London. 

Capital Authorized, 12,500.000. Capital Paid Up, 11,400,000. 

Directors — Henry Goschen, Chairman, London; Christian de Gulgne, 
San Francisco; Charles Hemery, London; John L. Howard, San Fran- 
olsoo; Bendix Koppel, London; Grevllle Honaley Palmer, London; Norman 
D. Rldeout, San Francisco; Arthur Scrivener, 'jondon. 

Agents In New York, Messrs. J. P. Morgan &. Co. 
BRANCHES: Portland. Oregon ; Tacoma, Wash.. SeaUle. Wash- 
Letters of credit Issued available lor travelers and the purchase of mer- 
chandise In any olty of the world. Deal in foreign and domestlo excha nge 
Accounts of country banks reoeived. Terms on application. 

A. L. Black, Cashier W. Mackintosh, Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With whloh Is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. $8,000,000- Reserve Fund, l2.CW0.ixw. 

Aggregate Resouroes over 170,000,000- 

Hon. Geo- A- Cox. President: B E. Walker, Geueral Manager. 

J. H.Ptummer. Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St-.E- C, S. Cameron Alexander. Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exohange Place. Alex. Laird and Win- Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg: Yukon District 
Dawson. White Horse: British Columbia: Atlln, Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood, Kamloops. Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Sandon, 
Vancouver. Victoria- In the United Slates— New York, N. Y. San Fran- 
cisco. Cal- Seattle. Wash- Portland, Ore- Skagway, Alaska- 
Bankers In London— The Bank of Scotland; Messrs- Smith. Payne & Smlthf> 
Bankers In New York — The American Exohange National Bank. 
Agents In Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans- 
—The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franelsoo Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Ealns, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sanwome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital t2. 500,000 Pald-Up Capital, t2.000.000 

Reserve Fund, tl.000,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London* E. O. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Frerea & Lie. 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw dlreot on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. OREENEBAUM, Manager. 
__ R. ALTSCHTJL. Cashier. 



The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast oorner of Sansome and Pine Sts.. San Franolsco 
Jab. K. Wilson. President Wm. Piebob Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL tBOO.000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. 1147.000. 

DIRECTORS- James K. Wilson. Win. J Dutton.Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York—Hanover National Bank. Chase National Bank: 
Chemloal National Bank, Boston— National Shawmut Bank ; Philadel- 
phia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis— The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City—First National Bank. London— Bi own. 
Brown. Shipley &. Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes A Co. Denver— National 
Bank of Commerce- Johannesburg— Robinson South African Bank'g Co. 
Ltd. 

Germania 1 rust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, tl.000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve. 1450,000 

Authorized to act as Exeeutor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 
Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 

PAID ON TRUST DEPOSITS AND SAVINGS. INVESTMENTS Carefully selected 

for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President: W. A. Frederick, Vice-President; H. 
Brunner. Cashier ; J. O. Rued, Trust officer. 

Board of Auditors— A. G. V\ leland. Geo. W. Bauer and J- C. Rued. 

Board of Directors — F, KTonenberg, Fred A. Kuhle. F ed Woerner, W. A. 
Frederick, F. C. Slebe. John Rapp, Walter M. Wllle t and Herman L.-E. 
M*yer. E. A. Denicke. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Paid Up tl.600,000 

Reserve Fund... 700,000 
Agents at New York-J. A W. Sellgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Ibsucs letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exohange and bullion 

IGN. BTEHfHABT. P. N. IJLLENTHAL. Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St Mills Building 



Capital Authorized t6.000.000 

Subscribed 8,000.000 



NTBRBST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 



William KWard 
William Babcock 
Aadm Grant 



Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 

8. L. Abbot. Jr. 
«">. D. Baldwin 
L, F. Monteagle 



H.H, Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutoheu 
R. II . Pease 



July IS. 1902. 



SAN FRANClo O NEWS LETTER. 



Zt 



"Truth" Grows Dangerous 



He replies to Iconoclast's letter of last week, says a lot 
about the gentleman's repulsive personality and little 
about the Dewey monument. 

Editor News Letter — Dear Sir: I will confess much 
surprise that thp blasphemous "Iconoclast," whose arau- 
i last week, lias hart the temerity to 
again appear in print in defense of liis untenable position. 
I cannot understand the character or mental attitude of 
such people as "Iconoclast," to whom nothing is sa 
anil who have no knowledge of either logic or fair play. 
I defy you. sir. or anybody else, to find a single sentence In 
his last letter which In any way answers or attemi 

r the faets I set forth. Instead he presents a lot 
of foolish vaporings which I acknowledge my inability to 
understand. Some of his statements are absolutely non- 
al. He says that "it was not Admiral Pewey's fault 
that he became confused with a rat poison." By referring 
to my former letter I merely to strengthen my conviction, 
for I have a better memory than Iconoclast). I find that I 
denied that Admiral Dewey had had a rat poison named after 
him, and defied my opponent to prove that he had. Instead 
of trying to do so he merely reiterates his foolish statement. 
I leave it to the public whether such a method can be called 
argument. 

"it were an act of rare indelicacy to rear a man's tomb 
at public expense before he is dead," says this smart 
Aleck, Iconoclast. That is about as idiotic as anything this 
scoffing ass has said, and betrays his ignorance and shallow- 
ness of mind. A tomb, as iiwi, sir, are doubtless aware, is 
for the interment of a dead body. It is a monument we are 
to put up to the great Admiral Dewey, who is very much 
alive — much more so than Iconoclast, who is so ignorant 
and shallow-minded tfiat he does not know the difference 
between a tomb and a monument. 

As to his reflection on my style of communication, 1 
suppose I should calmly pass them over — but I cannot 
help reflecting on how far removed from a gentle- 
man a man is who will assert that an honorable opponent's 
arguments put him to sleep. Such attempts at satire are 
very undignified, and are never indulged in by one of good 
breeding. Neither is snoring, of which Iconoclast con- 
fesses himself guilty. It is well known that a gentleman 
never snores. 

Iconoclast is fond of idulging in personalities, also a 
very vulgar method of newspaper combat. He is pleased 
to imagine that I am a heavy-set old gentleman, which is 
far from the truth. I am proud to agree with him that I 
am respectable (a characteristic which I doubt he possesses) 
but I am not fat, nor do I approach such a condition. I am 
tall, slender, and in spite of my studious habits, am not 
stooped. As to age, I am 62, which, in a man of my tem- 
perate and regular habits, cannot be considered at all old. 
Iconoclast's personalities reflect more on him than they do 
on me, for they prove him a boor, a vulgarian, a shallow, 
addle-pated, ignorant upstart without brains enough to 
realize his own deficiencies or to appreciate the worth of an 
honorable opponent. 

In conclusion, I would call attention to the last sentence 
in Iconoclast's baleful and spiteful screed. There are no 
words of condemnation severe enough for a man who will 
deliberately parody words of Scripture as this sacriligious 
scoffer has done. He has proven himself an infidel, a 
traitor to his country, and, sir, an eggregious ass. Believe 
me, very sincerely yours, 

TRUTH. 



BANKING. 

Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank 



SAN FR-VN' 



I Hl'ttnl. Surplus, mid Vmlivi.li ,1 ) «o cfi i qqnofl 
i-rolllD. .l.ily Jl. loiH. / *»•»•■•*'»'•«•• 

hi ei.icT KvAim. Acting ('resident ; Ilimr.K H. Kisn, Manager- H. Wads- 
worth Cashier: F. I.. I.IPMAS. Ahkt. Camhikk: II. L. Mit.l.F.H, Aunt. ('ashler. 

Branches— New York;Salt Lake. Utah: Portland, Or- 

Correspondent* throughout the World. (Jenersl Ranking Imslticsa tran- 



San Francisco Savings Union 



532 CALIFORNIA HTREET 8. F. 



Deposit* Jan. 1. 1902... f90.026.462 

Paid-up Capita] 1.000.000 

E. B. PONT). President 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 



Reserve Fund H30.90S 

Contingent Fund 480.204 

W. O. B. OeFREMERY. Vlee-Presldent 
R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau have moved to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreets, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Dlreotors — Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 

0. Miller, Robert Watt, George C, Boardman, Daniel E, Martin, Jacob 
Barth. E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Franotsco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
landstn the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In oheoks payable 
In San Franolsco. Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance tee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only 6:30 lo 8 o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. S2.0OO.00O. 

Surplus, Jl.000,000. 

Undivided Profits, July 1, 1902. »S,027.997.88 

WILLIAM ALVOKD president | THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vice-Pres't I. F. MOULTON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CLAY Seoretary I SAM H. DANIELS Ass't Cashier 

COBRESPONDENTS 
New York — Messrs. Laldlaw & Co. : the Bank of New York. N. B. A. 
Baltimore — The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank ; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis — Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev. — Agency of The Bank of California. London — Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild Ac Sons. Paris — Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin — 
Direction der Disconto Qesellschaft. China, Japan, and Eaet Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit Issued, available in all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,347,387.58 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1 000 000.00 

Deposits June 30. 1902 31.698 792 56 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker: First Vlce-Presldenl 
John Lloyd; Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 

H. Horstmann, Ign. Strtnhart, H. B. Russ, Emll Rohte, N. Ohlandt, and 

1. N. Walter. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Sec- 
retary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attor- 
ney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

.Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

83 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000.000. Paid Up Capital 1300,000 

Jambs D. Phklan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Stobt, Cashier John A. IIoopee, Vice-President 

O. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. Charles Holbrook: 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Oapital..Sl2,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... 8250, 000 
Pald-ln-Capltal 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office— S. W. Cor. California and Battery Streets, San Francisco 

Wm. Corbin. General Manager 

Crocker- Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital $1,000 000 

Wm. H. Cbockbb, President Gao. W. Kline. Cashier 

O. E. Grebn, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jb.. Assistant C&ahiei 

Directors— W. H. Crooker, E. B Pond. George Crocker. O.E.Green. G.W. 
Henry « line. T. Scoti.G. W. flcott 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 







murance 



a 




The Britishers are gamblers of the first water. A press 
despatch says that the recent illness of Edward VII will 
cause a loss of tens of millions of dollars to the regularly 
organized life insurance companies alone. A much greater 
loss will fall upon financial companies of various other 
kinds, which have taken heavy risks on the king's life at 
high rates of interest. American life insurance companies, 
however, will suffer no loss, because in this country to 
obtain life insurance policies the applicant must estab- 
lish an insurable interest in the person insured. King 
Edward carries the enormous sum of 53,600.000 placed with 
English companies. This is on personal policies, upon which 
he pays premiums out of his private purse. The total risks 
on his life, on policies by business men, is placed at 
$21,000,000. The Czar of Russia is said to carry personal 
insurance of $4,000,000 as well as $1,500,000 on the life of 
the Czarina, and $2,500,000 on that of the Grand Duchess 
Olga. The Emperor of Germany carries $5,000,000 personal 
insurance. 

An Eastern insurance journal, commenting on this, says 
that it is highly improbable that the king carries $3,600,000 
of insurance on his life. He could not carry it in all the 
English companies combined, and the American companies 
combined would not carry so much. Yet they far exceed 
the English companies in the extent of the risks they as- 
sume, and are able to carry. There is no means of estimat- 
ing the amount of insurance carried on the king's life as 
a precautionary measure for tradesmen who desired to 
make outlays for the coronation. These insurances are not 
effected in life insurance companies, but are placed in 
Lloyds associations of business underwriters organized for 
the purpose of speculating on marine and unsettled risks 
of a purely conjectural character not governed by ' the 
well known laws of ascertained average in chance. It is 
improbable that any life insurance company will lose any 
heavy amount in the event of King Edward's death — that is. 
any unusual amount. All the amounts cited in the dis- 
patch quoted are purely fictitious or ludicrous exaggerations 
of small facts. 



Mr. Cunningham of the Glens Falls has cut some more 
Cunning-ham sandwiches: 

The manager who is habitually giving a piece of his mind 
to agents may be a bit wasteful of a limited quantity. 

Fire insurance for revenue may not be a present success, 
but well-selected fire insurance for protection has never 
been a failure. 

That underwriters and the public have a mutual interest 
in maintaining adequate rates may be actual, but it has not 
become an influential axiom. 

Policy may have greater influence than principle in pro- 
moting honesty, but a policy sometimes seems to be the 
principal influence otherwise. 

The trouble with some of us is not that we have to pad- 
dle our own canoe, but that we dislike to paddle. 

Diplomacy is the art of making it appear that the risks 
you can't get are the sort you wouldn't write. 

It is the oblique motive for some good insurance advice 
that depreciates its direct influence. 

Keep with conservative insurance practices and avoid 
the crowd. 

Don't be afraid of ruts made by the wheels of successful 
management. 



There are agents who prefer taking poor risks to good 
advice. 

The use of magnifying glasses in examining daily reports 
won't increase the rates. 

Half insurance truths make a whole lot of difference in 
results. 

Some agency offices seem satisfied just to be connected 
with good owners of good property by telephone. 

Taere are insurance men who have no use for opportuni- 
ties unless they are automatic. 

There are insurance men who talk as if they were the 
sole exception to the frailties of their calling. 

An agent writes: "Rates have been razed here." We turn 
this information over to the optimists and pessimisfls 
in the business to decide for themselves whether this is a 
bad spell of a good local condition, or a good spell of a bad 
local condition. 

The lay press is "airing" a variety of proposed fire in- 
surance reforms which are about as "remedial" as advising 
a man afflicted with hay fever to marry a grass widow. 

Companies may come and companies may go, but, like 
Tennyson's brook, fire insurance will go on forever. 

• • • 

The Insurance Commissioner of the State of Missouri has 
been after the town and country Mutual Fire Insurance com- 
panies. He finds them wanting. 

The following companies have been examined by the 
Department and their condition found to be unsatisfactory: 
National Town Mutual dwelling house of Rockport, Webster 
Grove's Town Mutual of Webster Grove. Western Home 
Town Mutual of Kansas City. Union Town Mntual of Kansas 
City. A careful examination was made of these companies, 
and owing to their being found wanting the Department in- 
structed them to cease writing new business. They are 
instructed to get their affairs in better shape within sixty 
days, or the Department notifies them they will be closed. 
And in the meantime, like Mutuals are running rampant in 
California. 

%■ * » 

Tarleton Brown, business manager of "Insurance Report." 
has resigned, and goes to Chicago, where he will engage in 
life insurance work. 

• • • 

The bill providing for the incorporation of the Columbian 
National Life Insurance Company, of Massachusetts, with a 
capital stock of $200,000, has been passed by the Legislature 
of that State, and signed by the Governor, and is now law. 
The company proposes commencing business in the fall.' 

• • • 

From the date of its organization to the commencement 
of 1901, the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York 
City, has paid to policyholders or holds in trust for them 
for future protection the vast sum of $921,998,452. This is 
rapidly approaching the billion dollar mark. 

• • • 

. The Germania Fire Lloyds of Chicago has organized for 
business, and will begin writing policies with fifteen under- 
writers this month. 

• • • 

The Home Insurance Company of New York will not enter 

England. 

• • • 

The much heralded and loudly bragged little Conservative 
Life Insurance Company of Los Angeles evidently had bet- 
ter prepare for trouble. It will be remembered that the 
News Letter a year or more ago reported the transfer ol 
the members of the Southwestern Life Insurance Company 
of Marshalltown, Iowa, to the Conservative Recent de- 
velopments show that the defunct Iowa institution had some 
several policy-holders in Missouri. These policyholders 
are complaining of the cost of their insurance as increased 



July 19. 1903. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



by the Conservative, and are preparing to sue th- 
pany and attarh the deposit which It has with th<- 
of Inwe. California Munia to In' n very DnheaJI 
for Its local modern life Ins'imin ■•■ companies. Ii ha 
nallnnally endorsed fire Insarance companies and only 
one life company, the old reliable Pacific Mutual, «rhl< 
parently occupies the field to liw exclusion or detrlmi 
ne»ly organlied companies. 



A savory phase of medh al mlspractlce was reveal 
an Oakland court this week, where Mr. Charles Von Radesky, 
charged with practicing without a license, revealed the 
fact that he had bought a "dummy" or bogus medical di- 
ploma purporting to he from a Wisconsin medical school, 
which was out of business at the time when the diploma was 
supposed to have been issued. There Is a brood of un- 
scrupulous lawyers in this city who live by the sale of 
bogus diplomas. They should be caught and horsewhipped 
together with the "doctors" who patronize them. 



Smartest Train of All. 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumed 
triweekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
es'mr winter journey across the continent. 



Mothers, be sure and use "MrB. Win3low's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



The next bottle of whisky you buy resolve to try the "Jesse 

Moore." You've heard it was the best; prove It by practical test 



r IRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (limited) 



OF LONDON ENGLAND 



O. F- MUIJ.INS. Manaeer," H6-U8 California street, 8. F. 
FIBE mSUBANCE 

Northern Assurance Company. 

OF LONDON n^fyH^V AND ABERDEEN 



Cash Assets 

$20,000,000 

221 SanBome Street, 




Geo, F, Gtant 

Manager 
San Francisco. 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(Incorporated by the State of New York.) 

Assets, over $74,000,000. Liabilities, $64,000,000 

Surplus, over $9,000,000. 

Issues policies for all approved forms of insurance; adapted to 
all stations and circumstances of life. Policies are free from re- 
strictions as .to travel and residence; are clear, concise business 
contracts, and conditions are plain and simple and easily under- 
stood. 

Pacific Coast head office; Hayward Building, corner Califor- 
nia and Montgomery streets, San Francisco. Home Office— New 
York City. 

John B. Hegeman, President; Haley Flske, Vice-President; 
Geo. H. Gaston, Second Vice-President; Geo. B. 'Woodward, 
Third Vice-President; James S. Roberts, Secretary; Thornton R. 
Richardson, Assistant Secretary; A. S. Knight, Medical Direc- 
tor; Thomas H. Wlllard, Medical Director; Eugene M. Holden, 
Assistant Medical Director. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 





N. Schleasinger, City Agent. 



304 Montgomery St, S. F. 



NSURANCE. 



MAjir* t: dkfju 

M«Ji IMM 

,„.„„,.... Oapllal Bulnaribed $4,482,750 

ASSURANCE o»piui Pauup 2,241,37s 

Awl" 19,106,145 

.„,,„ ....,„, Capita] Subscrlhed $5,000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. <""'! nl rM Up , IS?'22S 

Assets. 2,602.060 

Founded A. I). 1792 

Insurance Oompany of / lorth America 

OF PHILADELPHIA. PENS. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders ..'. $6,022,016 

JAMBS D. BAILEY. General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D., 1720. 

Capital Paid Up, $3,446,100. Assets, $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy Hldrs, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $184,000,000 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH; 

501 Montgomery StreeL 
FRANK W. DICKSON, Manaeer 
HERMANN NATHAN tt. PAUL F. KINGSTON. Local Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

OP New Zealand 
Capitol. 15,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street. 

Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4,318,611.00 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,008,423.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Dept.. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limitec 1 

Established 1782. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St., S. F. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $67,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, Germany. 
Capital, $2,250,000. Assets, $10,984,248. 

Voss, Conrad & Co., General Manager. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St., S. F. 

The Continental Fire Ins. Go. 

OF NEW YORK 

ARTHUR Q. NASON & CO., Metropolitan managers 

435 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 
Telephone Bush 361. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 




Highland Springs 



ALWAYS OPEN 

The famous health and pleasure resort of I-ake County. Fin- 
est waters for the cure of Liver, Kidney, Malaria, Rheuma- 
tism and Stomach Troubles. Every comfort and amusement. 
Free swimming tank. Croquet, Tennis. Regulation bowling 
alley. Riding and driving horses. Splendid Trips to moun- 
tains or valley. 

NOTE SPECIAL RATES: 

One person in room, "small hotel,' $10.00 per week. 

Two persons in room, "small hotel," $18.00 per week. 

One person In room, "cottages." $11.00 per week. 

Two persons In room, "cottages," $20.00 per week. 

One person in room, "Main Hotel," $12 and $14 per week. 

Two persons in room, "Main Hotel," $20.00 and $22.00 per week 

Special Inducements for scnool teachers or families desiring 
to remain by the month. 

For descriptive circulars and analysis of the waters call on 
The Tourist Information Bureau, 10 Montgomery street, or 
the Traveler Office, 20 Montgomery street, or write direct to 
Craig & Warner, Managers, Highland Springs, Lake County, 
California. 



Anderson Springs 



Only natural Mineral Steam 
Baths in Lake County 

14 distinct mineral springs of 8 different characters, hot and 
cold. Hot Sulphur and Iron Bath*. Board: $10 to $14 per 
week Baths free. Address J. ANDEKSON, Anderson 
Springs, Middletown, Lake Coun/y, California. 

Fare — San Francisco to Springs and return reduced to 88. Send for circu- 
lar. Full particular wt S. F. News Letter, 5% Kearny St . S*n Francisco. 



HOTEL 
MATEO 



SAN '1 VTtO 
CAL. 



WQENN & SPqULDING 
Prop' V s 



A HIGH-CLASS SUMMER 
AND WINTER RESORT 



Reservations may now be 
made for August, Septem- 
ber, October, and the win- 
ter season. 



Hotel El Monte 



LOS GATOS 



Under new management Five minutes from depot. Now 
open for business. Table unsurpassed. 

RATES $8 to $15 Per Week. 



THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the finest Static Galvanic sinusoidal and 
Faradic Electrical apparatus. A corps of well-trained nurses of 
both sexes skilled In all forms of treatments and manipulations 

Rest cure scientifically carried out A quiet, home-like place 

beautiful scenery. Mt. Hamilton and the famous Lick Observa- 
tory in plain view; one block from electric cars; fifteen minutes' 
walk from the center of the city. Terms: $10 to $20 per week 
Including medical attention and regular treatment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Joee, Cal. 



The Geysers 



One of the wonders of 
the world 



New Management Newly furnished. Room* hnrd liniahed 
First Class Table. Me-ls a la Carte flairv and Vegetable 
"arden. New B« b Houses. E'eotrlo Light. Hwimmlne 
Pool. Twenty miles of the hesl fishing streams. Hunting 



BEAUTIFUL 



Laurel Dell 



THE O RIO 1 V a L 8WIT Z ER- 
LAND OF AMERICA. 



Largest dining-room in county; new myrtle cotiage; 
hunting, boating, bathing, marine toboggan, new livery, 
coqnet. tennis, bowling. Tally Hn coach free to gne.Hn 
daily to our mineral springa; 15 different kinds of 
water. 
Accommodations for three hundred people. 

E. DUKNAN. 
Laurel Dell. Lake Co., Cal. 



Blue 



New Inn chef* ana 



BOATING. BVTHINQ, FISHING AND HUNTING, 
boats. Tenuis court and all other amusements. 

HEDICAL SPRINGS 

Our famous "White Sulphur"' Springs. Hot and Cold B<«i..«. and etc. 
•-end fir new pamphlet. O WEIS^AN, Midlake P. O.. Lake Co-. Cal. 

or call at office of O. N. W. W K. K. < o., 6.V) Ma kel Street. 



Lakes 



Hotel Ben venue and cottages 



LAKEPORT, CAL. 
LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking the 
shore on Clear Late. New pavilion boat-bouse, and bowling .illey. 
Upen I'll the year. Sp<cial faci ities for accommodating families 
with children; home cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and super- 
ior fishing. Lovely drives and walks. New sanitary plumbing. 
Modern improvements. Re-furnished, re-decorated. Rates: $8, 
$10, $12 per week. Special rates to families. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



Skaggs 



HOT SPRINGS, Sonoma County; only i% 
hour* from S. K., and but 9 miles singing; 
waters noted for medicinal virtues; be*t 
natural hot mineral water hi.ll. in Mate: 
boating and swimming in Warn Spring 
Creek; good Irout streams; tele, bone, telegraph, daily mnil. express, and 
S. F. morning and evening papers, First-class Hotel and Stage Service. 
Both morning and aitern.-on stages: round trip from S. F only f 5.1 0. Take 
Tlburon Ferry at 7:3u a, m. or 3.3) p. m. Sundays, 8 a. m. only. Fates. ?2 a 
day Or $12 a week. References: Any guest of the past Beven years. Pa- 
tronage of 1901 unprecedented J. F. MDLGREW, Skaggs. Cal. 



Congress Springs. 



A charming resort In the Santa Cruz Mountains: 2 hours from San 
Francisco: delightful climate: swimming and all sports: table 
unsurpassed: best mineral water on the coast; open all the year. 
H. H. GOODMAN. Manager. 



RATES— tlO. 12 14 . 



FABIU8 FERAUD. Lessee and Manager 



WISDOM CONSISTS in doing the right thing at the right 

time. 
WE ARE ALL WISE— afterwards— when It is too late. 
THE TIME to take care of your health is when you have it. 
NEVER ALLOW yourself to get into a rut or a groove, 

either physically or mentally. 
bREAK the monotony that makes so many men and women 

old long before their time. 
TAKE an occasional trip. 

THE COUNTRY along the California Northwestern Railway 
is not the only place to visit, but it certainly is the best. 
ITS LOCATION between the coast and the interior affords 

that salubrious climate which invites living In the 

open air, and fills up the system with renewed energy. 
CALL or write for 

"VACATION, 1902," 

A little book Issued by the California Northwestern Rail- 
way Company, (The Picturesque Route of California) giv- 
ing Camping Locations, Hotels, Mineral Spring Resorts, 
and a long list of Country Homes where board for the Sum- 
mer can bp secured at from $6.00 to $8.00 per week. 

Ticket Offices. 650 Market St.. (Chronicle Building) and Tlhuron Ferry, loot 

of Market St. General Office. Mutual Life Building. Sansome 

and California Sta. San Francisco 

II. 0. WHITINGOon'l. Manager R. X RTAN. Oan'l. Put Agt 



July 19, 1902. 



SAN FRANCI^'O NEWS LETTER. 



A NOVEL OF LIFE. 
The demand of the prwont 'lny Is a M«T»t<ir>\ 

as well as In the «clen 

unless the author Is n student of tlio lit.' he kttempti 
This Is shown by the books of Mr. \V. \ I 
What Is the charm of "The Outcasts" ami the ■' 
The reason why people admired these stories is 1 
MY. Fraser describes the incidents as if with a personal 
knowledge. He has the art of breathing life into lii- 
tures and converting them into living, palpitating real 
This Is exactly what he has done in "Thoroughbreds." His 
men are men, his women are women, and the horses he 
describes are not rocking horses, but spirited, gently Intelli- 
gent creatures, who understand the tempers of their ma 
and respond to b call with human eagerness. The San Fran 
cIsco Evening Post will commence on July 23d the publica- 
tion of "Thoroughbreds," which is Mr. W. A. Fraser"s best 
story. For the sum of 40 cents a month this new book and 
all the news of the day can be read. 



OBITUARY. 
Captain John Taylor McKenzie, for years master of the 
North Shore Railroad ferry line, died of heart failure at his 
home in San Rafael last Friday night. His death comes 
most personally home to the thousands who had known him 
in his public service, a service which lasted the longest 
of any of the bay captains. He was master of the San 
Rafael from the time that steamer, built in the East, was 
launched in bay waters, twenty-seven years ago, and he 
was in command when that ill-fated vessel was struck by 
the Sausalito and sent to the bottom. Captain McKenzie's 
coolness and masterful conduct on that occasion won the ad- 
miration and gratitude of the passengers of both vessels. 
Captain McKenzie leaves a wife, Mrs. Eleanor M'cKenzie, 
and a son and daughter. 

News of the untimely death this week of Mrs. John A. Mc- 
Near, who was Miss Julia Noy, comes as a blow to the 
many friends of the family in this city and across the bay. 
Mrs. McNear succumbed to an operation for appendicitis. 
The McNears had been married but a little over a year, and 
the young people were living in Liverpool, where Mrs. Mc- 
Near had charge of the interests of his father, Mr. George 
W. M'cNear. Mrs. McNear was an accomplished musician 
and was beloved for her charming character. 

San Francisco lost one of her best-known and most public- 
spirited pioneers last week by the death of Mr. Bernard 
Adolph Becker, president of the German Savings Society. 
Mr. Becker, who died at the age of 70, came here from Ger- 
many in his early youth. His career was most successful, 
and his friends were many. He was a member of the So- 
ciety of California Pioneers and of Occidental Lodge, F. 
and A. M. 

Dr. John T. McLean died this morning at the Alameda 
Sanitarium. He was at one time a special agent of the 
United States Treasury Department and afterwards Sur- 
veyor of the Port of San Francisco. 



Southfield Wellington Coal 
order from any coal dealer. 




NEAREST THE CITY 



California and Foreign Marbles 
African Colored Marble and Onyx 



5ummer Resorts 



Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 

S.iiila Ona Mountain, 

Delightfully located 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 

PATH1NG, FISHING, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 

Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 




W. H. McCORMICK 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

All Kinds ©f Marble and Granite 

115 CITY HALL AVENUE, NEAR LARKIN ST. San Francisco, Oil, 



BOWLING=== 



For the summer the Hotel Vendome management announces 
many new attractions at that popular resort. Two inagnifioent 
swimming pools are near the hotel, and guests may have all the 
pleasures ol seaside resorts. 

===swinniNG 

Bowline, (Tolf, tennis and ping ponB are among the rrnny diver" 
siona. Johannsen's Orchestra will be there all the time. Auto- 
mobile coaching from the hotel throughout the valley. 

GEORGE P. SNELL, Manager. 

At Hotel Vendome, 

SAN JOSE. 



BAY STATE HOUSE AND COTTAGES 

Santa Cruz— Sunny rooms, good table, best service; reason- 
able rates. MRS. L. MATHISON, Proprietress. 

BEN LOMOND Park House and Cottages; an ideal re- 
v^iim^ sort, unsurpassed climate, drives, fish- 
ing and bunting, two hours' ride to Big Basin. Moderate prices. 
MRS. I. N. HAYES, Proprietor. 

Also Known aa 
California Hot Springs 
Quaintly situated, surrounded by mountains and woodland, and consist" 
ing of three different hot springs. Reached directly by trains of the Cali- 
fornia Northwestern Railway or those of the Southern Pacific Santa Rosa 
Line, (no staging) New Hotel, equipped with modern improvements, ac- 
commodating 200 guests, Swimming Bath, prUale Bath. Ball Room, Music, 
Livery, fine Drives Tennis Court; Rates 82 and $2.50 a Day ; 812 and Sl4 a 
week. Special terms for Families. Send lor illustrated booklet. Theodore 
Richards, Agua Callente, Sonoma County, Cal, The Half-Fare Sunday Ex- 
cursions on the California Northwestern Railway enab e visitors to spend a 
day at the Springs, returning to the City on the same evening. 



Agua Caliente Springs 



Byron 

Hot 

Springs 

Contra Costa Co. 
CAL. 



A SANITARIUM AND RESORT 

The new hotel is the finest on the Coast. Elegantly 
furnished' rooms and suites with private mineral 
ball is. All modern improvements for oomfort and 
safety. Excellent cuisine and an air of home com- 
fort. Rheumatism and Malaria yield quickly to 
these wonderful waters and baths. 

Address Manager Lewis, Byron Hot Springs, Cal, 
Call on Lombard & Co., 36 Geary Street, S. F. 



White Sulphur Springs 



SONOMA COUNTY CAL. 
Romantic Spot and Cura- 
tive Waters. 

These famous springs are located at the foot of Taylor Mountain, two-and- 
one half miles south of Santa Rosa, The waters are valuable as a curative 
in many ailments. The hotel and cottage are on an elevation overlooking 
Santa Rosa and the beautiful surrounding oountry. The climate is nlwayB 
dellghtfuland invigorating. Accommodation for sixty. Fine drives, boaiing, 
billiard, croquet grounds, dancing pavilion, hunting and first-class table. 
Free sulphur baths, hot or cold. Rheumatism, blood, skin and chronic dis- 
eases treated by competent physician. Positive cure. Hamman bath in con- 
nection. Rates: adults, 810 and 812 per week; children under ten, half rates- 
Special rates to families, rake boat, Tiburon Ferry, 7:30 a, m. or 3:3U P M. 
Fare, 81.50 to Santa Rosa. Bus meets trains. Address: E. HAWES, White 
Sdlphur *peings. Santa Rosa, Cal. Open all year around. Telephone: 
White Sulphur spri ngs. 

For best buffets, bars and sideboards and the medicine cabi- 
nets, "Jesse Moore"— pure rye or bourbon whisky— has no equal. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



Soft 
Harness 



You can make your har- 
ness as soft n3 a glove 
and aa tough ag wire by 
using EUREKA Har- 
ness Oil. You can 
lengthen Its life— make It 
luBt twice as long aa It 
ordinarily would. 

EUREKA 

Harness Oil 

mnkea a poor looking har- 
ness like new. Made of 
pure, heavy bodied oil, es- 
pecially prepared to with- 
stand the weather. 

Sold everywhere 
■ in cans— all sizes. 

Made by STANDARD OIL CO. 



TWO MEN. 

"These ought ye to do, and not to 
leave the others undone." 

A pale young man sat down on a 
bench in the park behind the reser- 
voir on Forty-second street. He put 
a torn bag of tools under the bench. 

A small, red-faced man came behind 
him. He stooped to steal the bag. 

The pale man turned, and said in a 
slow, tired way: "Drop that. It ain't 
worth stealing." 

The ruddy man said: "Not if you are 
lookin'." 

The pale man sat the bag at his 
feet, and said: 

"It's a poor business you are in." 

"You don't look as lr yours was any 
better." He sat down. "What's your 
callin'?" 

"I'm an iron-worker. Bridge work." 

"Don't look strong enough." 

"That's so. I'm just out of Belevue 
Hospital: got hurt three months ago." 

"I'm just out of hospital, too," he grin- 
ned. 

"What hospital?" 

"Sing Sing." 

"What? Jail." 

"Yes; not bad in winter, either. 
There's a society helps a fellow after 
you quit that hospital. Gives you good 
clothes, too." 

"Clothes? Is that so?" 

"Gets you work " 

"Work — good God! I wish they'd get 
me some." 

"You ain't bad enough. Go and grab 
somethin'. Get a short sentence; first 
crime. Come out, and get looked after 
by nice ladies." 

"My God!" 

"Didn't they do nothin' for you when 
you got out of that hospital?" 

"No! Why the devil should they? 
I'm only an honest mechanic. Are you 
goin'?" 

He felt his loneliness. 

"Yes; I've got to go after that job. 
It'll give me time to look about me. 
Gosh! but you look bad! Good-bye." 

The ruddy man rose, looked back, 
jingled the few coins in his pocket, hesi- 
tated, and walked away, whistling. 

The pale man sat still on the bench, 
staring down at the ragged bag of tools 
at his feet. — A. J. B., in Harper's. 



THE SINFUL BROTHER. 

It was at a certain church meeting, 
and the good bishop was calling for 
reports. He had a rather stern, sharp 
manner which sometimes jarred a lit- 
tle on the nerves of the more timid. 
By-and-by he came to Brother B., a 
lay delegate. 

"Brother B., what is the spiritual 
condition of your church?" demanded 
the bishop, briskly. 

"I consider it good," said the brother. 

"What makes you think it is good?" 
went on the bishop. 

"What do you call reiligious? Do 
they have family prayer?" 

"Some of them do. and some of them 
do not." 

"Do you mean to say that a man 
may be a Christian and not hold fam- 
ily prayers?" 

"Yes, sir; I think so." 

"Do you hold family prayer?" 

"Yes, sir, returned the brother, 
quietly. 

"And yet you think a man may be 
a Christian and yet not hold family 
prayer?" 

"I have a brother who is a better 
man than I am who does not hold 
family prayer." 

"What makes you think he is a bet- 
ter man than you are?" 

"Everybody says so, and I know he 
is." 

"Why does not your brother, if he is 
such a good man. hold family prayer?" 
thundered the bishop. 

"He has no family." meekly answered 
the brother. 



"I am a stranger here, sir. Can you 
direct me to a first-rate church?" 

"Oh, yes. Right round the corner." 

"What sort of a preacher have they?" 

"A very good man." 

"Interesting?" 

"Intensely so." 

"Eloquent?" 

"Very." 

"The best preacher in town, I sup- 
pose?" 

"Unquestionably." 

"What's the preacher's name?" 

"Ah, my friend, that is a question 
which modesty forbids me to answer." 



During the war of the rebellion the 
captain of a Maryland regiment soon 
to go into action was giving instruc- 
tions as to conduct under certain con- 
ditions. "We are expected to hold this 
position as long as possible," he ex- 
plained, "although we are to retreat 
if the advance of the enemy is not 
checked. But stand firm," he went on, 
'until you see the whites of their eyes — 
and," he added, "as I am a little lame, 
I think I'll start now." 



1 BITTERS 

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Gray, Lane & Stroh, Pacific Coast Acts.. 

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SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen froml Thieves. 

Chimmy — Wot is de best way to teach 
a girl to swim? Johnny— Well, yer 
want ter take her gently by de hand, 
lead her gently down to de water, put 
yer arm gently 'round her waist, and — 
Chimmy— Oh, cut it out! It's me sis- 
ter! Johnny— Oh! Push her off de 
dock! 

Two commercial travelers were com- 
paring notes. "I have been out three 
wieeks," said the first, "and have only 
got four orders." "That beats me," said 
the other; "I have been out four weeks 
and have only got one order, and that's 
from the firm to come home." 

Instructor — Lord Byron said that Ma- 
caulay woke up one morning and found 
himself famous. What great character 
in American literature is parallel to 
this? Student (who has been dozing) 
— Rip Van Winkle! 

Sandy — I want tae buy a nacktie. 
Shopman (showing some fashionable 
specimens) — Here is a tie that is very 
much worn. Sandie — I dinna want ane 
that's very muckle worn. I've plenty 
o' them at hame. 

Jimmy — I wish I went to school in 
Russia? Johnny — Why? Jimmy — It 
takes all day to call the roll. 



The Favorite Champagne 

Moet&GIjaridoii 



u 



»9 



Jinks — Most things that are bought 
go to the buyer. Jenks — Yes, except 
coal — that goes to the cellar. 



WHITE SEAL 

Dry,Deucate, Del/c/ous. 

The gain iii importations of Moot & Chandon Champagne during 1301 was 

equal to ,. i han 100 per cent of the combined increase of all other Champagne 

Houses.— "Itmi/orf m«t it Spirit Circular.' 



July 19, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 




By Betsy Bird. 

No engagement has of late created more of a slir than 
that of M.ss Klsi.- Sperry and Mr. Harold Crowell, u, 
nls player. It is denied, but I know, positively, that it is 
true. Of course. It Is not thought that Miss Sperry is mak- 
ing a very brilliant match, considering all her beauty and 
social backing, for she was the most beautiful, as well as 
the "leverest of the debutantes last year. However, as 
her aunt. Mrs. Will Crocker, is a thorough believer in mar- 
riage for love, she probably will not object, and Mrs. Austin 
Sperry. as one of the advanced woman believers in girls 
having opinions of their own. Elsie Sperry has more indi- 
viduality than nearly any girl of this smart set, with the 
exception of Therese Morgan. She has been abroad twice, 
and she passed two years at one of the best boarding 
schools in New York. The only objection to Mr. Crowell, 
who is a good-looking, bright fellow, is his lack of dollars. 
He was born into wealth, and his father, a New York mer- 
chant, lived in great opulence while Harold was a hoy. 
Then later the father died, and the boy supported his blind 
mother for years. He is a nephew of Mrs. George Powers, 
the wife of the oculist. The charm of the betrothal is that 
it is a love affair, which is more than can be said of many 
of the engagements. Miss Sperry is a great friend of Miss 
Landers and Miss Huntington, whose engagements have been 
announced recently. 

Another rumored engagement is that of the daughter of 
a Bishop and a young man of Honolulu, whose cousin, 
a naval officer, married an heiress if this city, and was killed 
in the South Sea Islands. The love affair began a few months 
ago, when the girl's father went to Honolulu in the inter- 
ests of the church. It is expected to be announced within 
a few weeks. 

During the week, a number of owners of automobiles 
formed a party and went from this city to Del Monte in 
their automobiles. They were Mr. and Mrs. Stirling Post- 
ley, Miss Sarah Drum and Miss Ethel Hager. All of these 
automobilists are of the very best, and the speed was of 
the swiftest. I fancy that Mrs. Postley will one day occupy 
a very high position in society. She has a good start al- 
ready, and one day her husband will inherit three or four 
millions. I know of nothing to inspire greater respect than 
this. They have taken a charming house on Sacramento 
street, and are furnishing it beautifully. She is extremely 
handsome, and they will entertain a great deal this winter. 

It is a very fortunate thing it was announced in the 
nick of time that it was Mr. and Mrs. Will Tevis, instead 
of Dr. Harry Tevis who bought the Bariohlet place at San 
Mateo, for since he has been renovating and re-furnishing 
his town house as well, the gossips set about it to find him 
a wife. They thought it could mean nothing else. The Will 
Tevises paid rather a high price for their country home. It 
was offered Mr. and Mrs. Athearn Folger for eighty thousand 
dollars a year ago, and now, after twelve months, it has in- 
creased in value thirty thousand dollars. 

Every one has been wondering what has become of Mr. 
Buckley Johnson, the Englishman who was so much enter- 
tained here three years ago, and then got into such unpleas- 
antness at the Pacific Union Club. Later, he took an agency 
for champagne, but disappeared soon afterwards. It seems 
the Fithians of Santa Barbara have gone to England to 
live, where Mr. Fithian has become a British subject. Mr. 
Buckley Johnson has gone home to England, and is living 



with the Fithians. 
No one i« mure surprised In locletj than the a 

the marring'- of I'r. BhlelS, His mom] 

tlnn made many a woman fam y she was playinc the star 
part In his heart, but he soon dlsllloslonlted them. V«r 

be refused to call on ladles, and when they nsk'-d him. he 
always looked extremely melancholy, and answered: l 
should like very nmeh to call, but I mar as well tell you that 
years ago 1 hived a woman very dearly, anil lost her. She 
Is now married and has several children, but she Is still 
there enshrined in my heart." It always gave him a very 
Interesting pose with women, and they were ever wondering 
who this paragon was. The old inhabitants are positive 
that once In the long ago Dr. Shiels was engaged to Mrs. 
Nat (leaser's half-sister, and she jilted him for another man. 
So it was supposed she was the woman enshrined in his 
heart, for he became desperately ill after her marriage. Now 
the gossips are wondering, since his marriage to Mrs. Dem- 




VARNEY W. GASKILL, Special Agent 
With HUBERT BROS., Importers 

SAN FRANCISCO 



TELEPHONE BUSH 25 



WEAR 



EAGLESON'S 

Fine vSnirts and 
Underwear 



748 AND 750 MARKET STREET 
242 MONTGOMERY STREET 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



ing of New York, if the Doctor had two sacred precincts in 
his heart. 

Every one is interested in the debutantes for next winter, 
and one of the most popular is sure to be Miss Newell Drown, 
the younger sister of Miss Bernie Drown. Miss Newell is 
very tall, fresh-complexioned, and has the same uplifting 
to her nose as her sister, but for all that she is not nearly 
so handsome. She has the same trick of laughter as Miss 
Bernie, and wears a great deal of her sister's favorite color, 
turquoise blue. Emily Wilson, another debutante to be, has 
greatly improved in style since she put on long skirts. She 
is quite a fetching little thing now, and looks very sweet 
when she comes to town wearing her pongee redingote and 
sunshade, and her long white, flowing veil. 

I fancy that when Mrs. Daniells, formerly Hastings, went 
to court the other day in England, she was glad she was 
friendly with her husband. They were separated for several 
months, and he followed her out here to make it up with her, 
but she had been a capricious child of fortune from her 
birth, and she refused to become reconciled. At that time 
her friends were very much shocked with her looks, for she 
had taken to dying her hair. However, their friend, Judge 
Ward McAllister, was called in as Mr. Daniell's representa- 
tive. He joined their hands, said "Bless you, my children!" 
and sent them home to England together. As a girl, Mamie 
Cogshill was incorrigible, and used to call her step-father, 
the Rev. John Hemphill, "Christ." 

The ping-pong tournament at San Rafael was very excit- 
ing to that suburb, and there is great satisfaction that Miss 
Bertie Bruce won, for she is the best-liked girl at the Hotel 
Rafael this summer. She has four cups, one for tennis, one 
for bowling, one for ping-pong, and one for the paper chases, 
and she is such a genuine, kind-hearted girl that every one 
is glad to see her win. I believe Miss Dean, whom she van- 
quished, is the champion of Burlingame, as well, and so Miss 
Bruce and Miss Salisbury remain the two stars of San 
Rafael. Speaking of San Rafael, I hear the Baron von 
Schroeder, who hase returned from his ranch, is to go abroad 
this fall, and will remain all winter with the Baroness in 
Paris. His young son is to enter the German military acad- 
emy. 

Mrs. McKittrick is in town for a few weeks, the guest 
of her father, General Shatter. When Captain McKittrick 
comes back from the East, they will both return there, and 
remain several months. 



Mr. and Mrs. Joheph D. Grant and Mr. Douglas Grant are 
staying at the Vendome, San Jose. Dr. and Mrs. Herbert 
Moflitt and Miss Joliffe are in Europe. Mr. Charles Allen 
and Miss Gertrude Allen are in the Yosemite. Mrs. Salis- 
bury and Miss Margaret are quarantined at their home in 
San Rafael, for Miss Salisbury has been ill from scarletina. 
Mr. A. B. Spreckels is staying at Paraiso Hot Springs. Miss 
Azalea Keyes is visiting friends in the city. Admiral 
Kempff and daughter, Miss Kempff, are back from the 
East. The Admiral expects to be re-stationed at Mare 
Inland. Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Herrin are at Bartlett Springs 
for a few weeks. Mrs. Russell is in Belvedere, the guest 
of her son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Russell. 
Mr. William D. Page and MY. Arthur Page are guests at Ru- 
bicon Springs. 

Mrs. Harry Mendell has been entertaining Miss Kate Cle- 
ment. Mrs. Huie has returned home after a visit of several 
months to her daughter, Mrs. Flournoy, at Fresno. Miss 
Lucie King has been the guest of Mrs. Horace D. Pillsbury 
lately. The Misses de Guigne have gone to Monterey, to be 
chaperoned by their aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. John Par- 
rott. Mr. James B. Duggan and son, Mr. Joseph Duggan, 
have left for Europe. Miss Jennie Blair has been the guest 
of Mrs. Dodge in San Rafael. Mrs. Forbes and her daughter, 
Miss Kate Forbes, have taken a cottage in San Rafael. In- 
vitations for the Oelrichs-Martin wedding have been received 



here. Miss Olive Holbrook has returned from the East, and 
is at her home in Menlo Park. Mrs. Gordon Blanding and 
M'iss Susie Blanding were tne guests of Mrs. Edith Blanding 
Coleman recently in San Mateo. Mr. Horace Piatt was re- 
cently the guest of Mr. Hermann Oelrichs at Monterey. Mrs. 
Bowditch Morton has been up from Monterey, staying at 1070 
Bush street. Miss Maud O'Connor was recently the guest of 
Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels. Miss Kate Clement has been 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Horace Blanchard Chase at their 
country place, "Stag's Leap," in Napa County. Mr. Henry 
J. Judah, accompanied by Miss Judah, have left for Tahiti 
Colonel and Mrs. J. V. D. Middleton and Mrs. Storm have 
gone to the Hotel Vendome. They will return in August 
and reside at 1001 Franklin street. Mr. Knox Maddox has 
been the guest of the Josselyns at their place near Red- 
wood. Miss Leontine Blakeman has gone to Tahoe. Mrs. 
Oscar Fitzalan Long, with Major and Mrs. Sherman, have 
arrived in Oakland. The Mills family has returned from a 
long trip to Portland. 

Mrs. J. H. Boalt is in New York and will sojourn abroad 
for several months. Mr. and Mrs. J. Philip Smith arrive 
here soon from Europe, and will go to Santa Cruz immedi- 
ately. Mr. E. M. Greenway is to pass the next few weeks 
at Lake Tahoe. M'r. and Mrs. W. G. Irwin, Mrs. Ivers, Miss 
Irwin, and Miss Wilson, will return from Honolulu early in 
August. 

Judge and Mrs. James A. Cooper are at Tahoe. Mr. and 
Mrs. George Howard, Mrs. Henry Schmieden and Miss Edith 
Findley, are in Paris, and will return to America next May. 

Mrs. Robinson Reilly is entertaining her sister-in-law, Miss 
Reilly, of Washington. Mrs. John de Ruyter and Miss Ag- 
nes Lane, who were in London recently, are expected home 
soon. M'r. Vincent Whitney is visiting his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. P. Whitney, at the Hotel Del Monte during his stay 
in California. Mrs. Charles Frederick Mullins and Mrs. 
John Rodgers Clark are at Tahoe, to remain several weeks. 
Mr. William Sanborn and Mr. John Sanborn are back from 
their fishing trip in the north. Mr. and Mrs. Claus Spreckels 
are expected home within a few days. Mrs. Spreckels' 
health was the reason for abandoning their proposed trip 
to Europe. 

Mr. Dean Hall has just returned from Philips Exeter Acad- 
emy, New Hampshire, where he is preparing for Harvard. 
He is with his parents, Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs. J. D. 
Hall, U. S. A., at the Occidental. The Halls go to the Hotel 
Rafeal August 1st. Miss Sara Collier has been the guest 
of Miss Daisy Van Ness at the Van Ness ranch in Napa 
County. Mrs. Henry Wetherbee and her party are back 
from a fortnight's stay in the Yosemite. Mr. and Mrs. Hora- 
uo G. Hellman have returned from their wedding trip to 
Portland, Oregon. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Shortridge have 
been in San Diego. 

Miss Harry Floyd is entertaining her friend, Miss Emily 
Pritchard, at the home of the former on Clear Lake. Mr. 
William E. Dargie, Jr., and Mr. Jefferson M'offitt, are in the 
Yosemite for a few days. 

Immediately upon the return of Mrs. Ira Pierce and Miss 
Sophia Pierce from Port Ludlow, arrangements will be made 
for the marriage of the latter to Dr. Brownell. Miss Su- 
zanne Blanding was to have been her only attendant, but 
as she is in mourning, Miss Olive Holbrook will take her 
place. Later in the season. Miss Helen Dean will be the 



Visiting Cards 

Wedding Invitations 

and Announcements 
LE COUNT BROS. CO. 

633 MARKET STREET 



July 19, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



29 



guest of Miss Wilson al Burlingame. Mr. Herbert M<-e and 
Mr. Denis Soar Is are to go to Tahoe later In I 
MYs. hennan Oelrlchs Is to give a big dinner for the Oelrlcha- 
Martln wedding party nest week nt Newport Mr 
Martin is to give a fan-well baehelor dinner during thi 
at Newport. His marriage to Miss Lily Oelrlchs will take 
plaee Thursday of next week. The cost of the bride's gown 
is estimated at ten thousand dollars. Mr. Orville Pratt will 
go to Oregon in the near future. Qenera] ami Mrs. J. F. 
Houghton and Miss Minnie Houghton will spend the month 
of August at the Hotel Rafael. Mrs Mountford Wil- 
son will soon depart for Lake Tahoe. Lieutenant Ed- 
mund Zane is visiting friends in Washington, and will ar- 
rive here during the latter part of the month. Miss Carrie 
Taylor will accompany Mr. and Mrs. George Pope when they 
go to Tahoe for August. Mrs. Eleanor Martin will join the 
Downey Harveys in Paris and remain abroad several months. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Schwerin, of San Mateo, are at Del 
Monte for two weeks. MY. Henry P. Bowie is spending 
two weeks at Monterey. Miss Lena Blanding has been the 
guest of Mrs. Harry Mendell in San Rafael. Miss Bailey 
was the guest of Miss Daisy Parrott at the Kotel Del Monte 
recently. Miss Mollie Phelan came over to the city from 
the Hotel Rafael during the week. M'rs. W. I. Kip and Miss 
Kip go to Los Gatos the first of August to pass the month 
with the Rev. W. I. Kip. 

Mrs. Frank Johnson gave a card party Friday a week ago 
at her home in San Rafael. Among her guests were Mrs. 
Walter L. Dean, Mrs. Frederick H. Green, Mrs. W. W. Mor- 
row, Mrs. George W. Gibbs, Mrs. Walter E. Dean, Mrs. Kip, 
Mrs. S. Louise Bee, Mrs. A. F. Fechteler, M'rs. George D. 
Boyd, Mrs. Harry Mendell, Mrs. M. M. Tompkins, Mrs. 
Gale, Mrs. Adam Grant, Mrs. Beaver, M'rs. Henry P. Sonntag 
and Miss Helen Dean. 

Mr. Truxton Beale gave a theatre party Thursday a week 
ago, at which he entertained Mr. and Mrs. Jules Brett, Mr. 
and Mrs. Fremont Older, Miss Marie Oge, M'iss Marie Wells, 
Mrs. Boyer, Mr. Thomas McCaleb, and Mr. Thomas Bar- 
bour. 

A picnic dinner was given recently at the Hotel Del Monte 
by the Baron "Von M'eder and Dr. William Valentine of Han- 
over, Germany. Some of those who attended were Miss 
Beryl Wbitney, Mr. and Mrs. J. Parker Whitney, Miss Jar- 
ecki, Mrs. W. N. Mann, Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Bowles, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. M. A. Miller, Mr. and Mrs. F. Nathan, Miss E. Wolff, 
Dr. and Mrs. Bowditch Morton, Mrs. C. E. Worden, Mrs. A. 
N. Towne, Mr. Nelson T. Shaw, Miss H. Carroll, Miss Car- 
roll, Miss Helen Warren, Mr. Vincent Whitney, Mr. Allan 
Wallace, Mr. W. T. Valentine, Mrs. F. D. Rawson, the Misses 
Rawson, and Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Runyon. 

The rrarriage of Miss Freda Ohlandt and Mr. Frank H. 
Ames was quietly celebrated Monday evening last at nine 
o'clock, at the home of the bride's father, MY. Nicholas Oh- 
landt, 601 Steiner street. The only attendants were four 
children, Misses Frieda Roesch, Olga Junghith, Helen Gray, 
and Master Louis Roesch. Mr. and Mrs. Ames have left for 
Dawson, and upon their return they will reside at the Palace. 
In the fall they will leave for the East and Europe. Last 
Wednesday evening a week ago, Mr. Ames and his bride-to-be 
were given a dinner by MYs. James McNab at his home on 
Broadway. Those invited to meet them were Mr. and Mrs. 
Nicholas Ohlandt, Mr. and MYs. S. M. Ames, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Gray, Mr. and Mrs. William Metson, Miss Josephine 
Metson, Miss Madge Fairman, Miss Mabel Buckley, MY. Louis 
Hanchette and Mr. Fife. 

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Mr. Joseph Anton Keller, inspector of the Mare Island 
Navy Yard, and Miss Mabel Louise Taylor, were married 
recently at the residence of MY. and Mrs. Horace Coffin 
in Mill Valley. The Rev. Mr. Graham officiated. Mr. and 
Mrs. Keller have gone to Santa Cruz for a few weeks. 

Miss Elsie Lilienthal, daughter of P. N. Lilienthal, is en- 
gaged to Dr. Edward Beer of New York City, son of Dr. 
Julius Beer, formerly of San Francisco. Mr. Beer is a grad- 
uate of Columbia, and high in his profession in New York. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Highton are taking their vacation 
this year at Honolulu, where Mr. Highton will attend to 
some professional business. They intend to return in two 
months. 

Mr. L. C. Straus, the Eastern representative of the Ex- 
aminer, with headquarters in New York, is visiting San 
Francisco. Mr. Straus is an old resident of this city, and 
during his stay East has made an enviable record as an 
advertising man. 

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Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
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FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great Jones street, N. Y. 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



A Humboldt County Man-Hunt 

By B. C. Courtney. 

The long chase after Tracey, the Oregon convict, recalls 
to the writer the sensational and ingenious escape from 
the county jail at Eureka, Humboldt County, of Charles 
Russell, a bicycle thief. It occurred about eight years ago. 
and although not so sensational or thrilling as Tracy's ad- 
venture, formed a very interesting criminal chapter. 

Russell was a "cycIo-Kieptomaniac." Outside of stealing 
bicycles and parts of bicycles he had no other criminal 
record. When his loot was discovered, hidden under an 
old mill on an island opposite Eureka, it was found to consist 
of several bicycles, and of all parts of bicycles, from tires 
down to cork handles. He was arrested, and soon made 
himself a favorite with the jail attendants — such a favorite 
in fact, that he was given unusual liberty, and on the day 
set for his trial he made his escape. He was captured with 
little trouble within a day or two, and when he was taken 
back to jail an "Oregon boot," a ring of steel weighing 
nearly twenty pounds was put around one of his legs. 

Russell became very docile, but began laying plans for 
another escape — and the way he made it was daring and 
clever. The County Jail of Eureka consists of a large room 
in which the prisoners are allowed to congregate during the 
day, and along the side and across one end is an "L" shaped 
row of steel cells, extending partly to the ceiling. Russell 
was confined in the one nearest the door opening into one 
of the courthouse corridors. 

On the night Russell intended to escape he made a paper 
funnel which he put on top of his cell. Then he took off 
his shoes and attached to them a string, which he ran up to 
the top of the cell. Then he climbed on top just before the 
jailer came in to lock up the prisoners. 

It was the jailer's habit to begin at the cell nearest the 
door. He liked Russell, and always stopped to talk to him. 
On the night in question, when he came along. Russell an- 
swered him sleepily through the paper tube he had made, 
making his voice sound as though coming from his cell; 
and to heighten the impression that he was preparing for 
bed he rattled his shoes on the floor by means of the string 
he had attached to them. The jailer bade him good night, 
and passed on to the other cells. 

Unfortunately for Russell's plans the jailer had closed 
the door behind him when he came in. So Russell lay on 
top of the steel bars of his cell all night. When the jailer 
came in the next morning he passed to the further cells, 
around the corner of the "L," in order, as was his custom, 
to unlock the cells furthest from the door first. He care- 
lessly left the main door open, and Russell, slipping from 
his hiding place, made his escape. 

His absence was discovered within fifteen minutes, but 
he had completely disappeared — Oregon boot and all. Con- 
sternation reigned in the jail and deputies were sent scour- 
ing the town. That Russell could go through a town of 
seven thousand in broad daylight with a steel ring on his 
leg, without attracting attention, is most remarkable. But 
he did it, and was not heard of for two days — then lie was 
seen out on a ranch over twenty miles from Eureka. Word 
was sent and the man-hunt began, much as in Tracy's case. 
It continued for two weeks. Russell did not attempt to 
shoot any of his pursuers, confining all his energy to running 
—and he ran like a deer. A bullet brought him down at 
last in the Mendocino woods, over one hundred miles from 
Eureka. He was badly wounded but finally recovered, was 
tried, and was sent to San Quentin for several years. 

The Oregon boot was absent when he was captured, and 
he told that he got rid of it by putting one side of the ring 
against a rock and pounding the other side with an axe. 
until he disintegrated it. The job took him nearly a whole 
day. For two days he wore the boot, holding it up by 
means of a cord. 



All this sounds like fiction, but it can all be proven by 
reference to Sheriff Brown of Humboldt, or any of the 
deputies who were on duty at' that time — although they 
are not fond of reference to the matter. 



Your suits will soon become old looking, baggy and 

shabby if you do not have them pressed and cleaned 
regularly. Send them to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing 
Works, 127 Stockton street, where they will be put in proper 
shape. They also clean gloves, cravats, curtains, laces, 
gloves and all such goods. Their work is unexcelled. 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



The very center of the city, convenient to all the 
big stores and all places of amusement Euro- 
pean plan, $1 a day and upwards. 

23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square Park.) Milton (tablet. 

Finest cafe in this city. 

New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont. BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 

A Hltli Class Exoluslve Hotel 
conduoted on the European 
plan at moderate rates. 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 
W. Johnson Quinn, Proprietor. 




RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C, 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 



of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. 
O. G. Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Everydelloatessen 

Domestic and Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



'I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim In.' 



-Da. Sbeadt, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 
L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 
Send for Pamphlet. 418 Sacramento 8t 



Worthington Ames 



nember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker in stocks, bonds and municipal securities. 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street Tel. Main 13S1. 

y^-..-., , D*-^>.f. Hayward Bid?.. California and Montgomery 
I llriV 1)1 ( )S streets. San Francisco. 
^" u ; *-" v - , ~" 206 New High Street. Los Angeles 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



July 19, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



31 



Campaign Echoes 



The spectacle •>( the Governor Of a gtm» Bute 

by a pack of fiijt hounds Is not nn inspiring on 
such a picture would represent the positions of <.;.. 
Cage and the editorial combination which is sookn. 

defeat. In the history of this State there has mv.r I n 

a canvass marked by more acrimony and personal malig- 
nity. The bitterness of the struggle between tin B 
and Terry factions of the Democratic party resembles it in 
some of its features. Tne three-cornered struggle of 1879 
(the new Constitution year) bears a family likeness to other 
of Its peculiarities. But good Government is not advanced 
by these methods. Nobody is benefited by tin ni. The 
editors profess to believe that the Governor is a scoundrel. 
who has permitted, if not instigated, the crimes of forgery. 
perjury and the falsification of public records at San Quen- 
tin; that he is a coldblooded villain who deliberately ap- 
pointed a cruel despot to the superintendency of the Home 
for Feeble Minded Children, with the expectation that 
those children would be ill-used and barbarously treated. 
Now, everybody knows that all this is nonsense; the editors 
know that it is all nonsense; everybody knows that the edi- 
tors know that it is all nonsense, and the editors know that 
everybody knows that it is all nonsense. Of what value is 
it. therefore? Governor Gage is neither a political angel 
nor a political scoundrel. From the moral view point he 
seems to be an average American citizen. His distinguish- 
ing characteristic is his independence. As Governor he has 
been willing to listen to advice, but not to submit to dic- 
tation — and therein lies the secret of the hostility of the 
editorial combination. The Governor refused to be dictate:! 
to, and so he has been put in the editorial stocks, and. as 
a once-noted writer used to put it, "pelted with dead cats." 
But nobody is deceived by this, and nothing is effected. 
Some say that this is practical politics; to a man up a tree, 
however, it looks more like practical indecency — some would 
say blackguardism. It degrades public life, and makes ear- 
nest men turn with disgust from the thought of participating 
in the public affairs. 

* * • 

It was said in the News Letter at the time the accusa- 
tions against Governor Gage in relation to San Quentin were 
first published, that upon their face they appeared to be 
tin thunder — shadowy and uncertain things which would 
not bear judicial investigation under the rules of evidence. 
And that is the whole bother over this thing. Both parties 
profess to want a judicial investigation. Why do they not 
come together? Well, simply because there are different 
kinds of judicial investigations. There is such a thing 
as a young Judge in deadly fear of the journalistic dead 
cat, admitting as evidence the wild imputations which con- 
stituted the first assault. Governor Gage, apparently, does 
not want that kind of a hearing, and up to the time of writ- 
ing has had the best of the scrap. 

* * * 

The party workers are working like beavers just now. The 
primaries are only about a month off, and party organization 
is the necessity of the hour. On the Democratic side of the 
house there is the same Egyptian darkness and silence that 
has prevailed from the first. But there may be a rattling 
among the dry hones yet. Politics are full of surprises. 



Swain's Bakery, on Sutter street, is the headquarters 

for San Francisco's most exclusive people. For twenty-five 
years it has enjoyed this distinction, and all through the 
high standard it maintains. It is a favorite luncheon place 
for shoppers. 



ALASKA 

Refrigerator 

Is the best con- 
structed ever put 
on this market. 
The Alaska will 
keep provisions 
longer and use less 
ice than any other 
refrigerator. Send 
for catalogue. 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO., 

Importers. 




REDUCED 

Genuine 

Wellington 

Coal 



FOR SALE BY ALL RELIABLE DEALERS 

$10.00 per ton 



A 


BEFORE leaving the 
city for your summer 
vacation you had bet- 
ter store your value 
ables in the Vaults of 


Wise 


the 


Precaution 


CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT . 
AND TRUST COMPANY 




Cor, Californlii&Monteromery St. 
San Francisco 



-The immense patronage of the Grand Hotel Cafe, 

Fay & Foster, proprietors, is evidence that the business men 
and club men of San Francisco appreciate a good thing. 
Mercantile lunch from 11 to 2 daily. 



WEAK MEN AMD WOMEN SVeV^t Me1££n rem- 



edy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs 
at 323 Market St.. San Francisco. Send for circular. 



Depot 



32 



8AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



July 19, 1902. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 

[Main Line. Foot of Market St. J 

From Junk 22, 1902 



leave] 



[akbivb 



7:00 A Benlola, Sulsun, Elmira, and Saoramento 6:K> p 

7:00 A Vacaville. Winters, Rumsey 7:55 r 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, CaliBtogra, Santa Rosa... 6:25 p 

8:00 A Davis. Woodland. Knlsrhta Landing, Marysvllle, Orovllle 7:55 p 

8:00 a Atlantlo Express. Oeden and East 8:25A 

8:00 A Nlles, Lathrop. Stockton - 7:25 p 

8 :00 a Nlles. Mendota, Hanf ord. Vlsalla, Porterville 4:55 p 

8:30 a Shasta Express — Davis, Williams, (for Bartlett Springs), Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff. Portland 7:55 P 

8 :30 A San Jose, Llvermore, Stockton, lone, Saoramento, Placerville, 

Marysvllle, Chlco. Red Bluff. 4:25 r 

8 :S0 A Oakdale. Chinese, Sonora, Tuolumne.. -,r.... 4:25P 

9:00 a Vallejo 12:25 p 

9:00A Lob Angeles Express — Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced. Raymond, Fresno, and Los Angeles 8:25 A 

9:30 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 p 

10:00 A Haywards. NlleB and way stations fI2:55 p 

10:00 A The Overland Limited — Ogden, Denver, Omaha, Chloago 5;2> p 

fl :00 p Saoramento River Steamers f 11:00 P 

3:00 p Benlola. Winters, Sacramento, Woodland, Williams, Willows, 

Knights Landing. Marysville, Orovllle 10:55 A 

3:30 p Haywards, Nlles, and way stations 7:55 P 

4 :00 p Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Oallstoga, Santa Rosa..... 9:25 A 

4:00 p Nlles. Llvermore, Stookton, Lodl 12:25 P 

4:80 p Haywards. Nlles, San Jose, Llvermore t8:55 A 

4:30 p The Owl Limited— Fresno, Tulare, Bakersfleld. Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 8,55 A 

5:00 p Port Costa, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton 10:25 a 

5:00 P Martinez, Antlooh, Stookton, Merced, Raymond Fresno 12:25 p 

t5:30 P Nilee Local 7:25 a 

6:00 P Haywards, NlleB, find San Jose 7:55 a 

t«:00P Vallejo 11:25 A 

«:0Op Oriental Mall— Ogden, Denver, Omaha, St, Louis, Chicago... 4:25 p 

7:00 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations 11:25 A 

17:00 p Vallejo - 7:55 p 

8:05 P Oregon and California Express — Saoramento. Marysvllle, Red- 
ding. Portland. Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

J9:10 P Hayward and Nlles tll:55 a 

Coast Line (Narrow Gause). (Footof Market St.) 

t7:45A Santa Cruz Excursion t8:05 P 

8:15 a Newark. Centerville. San Jose, Felton. Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:80 p 

T2:l5 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 A 

4 :15 p Newark. San Joae, Los Oatos |8:50 A 

64:15 p San Joae. Los Gatoa. Santa Cruz C8:50A 



OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 



From Saw Fbancisoo— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— f7 :15, 9:00. and II :00 
A. if- 1:00. 8:00.5:15, p. m. 

From Oakxanp — Foot of Broadway.— 16:00. t8:00. f8:05. 10:00 A, if. 12:00, 
1:00, 4:00 p.m. 

Coabtltne (Broad Gauge). (Third and TownBend streets.) 

6:10 A San Jose and way stations (j;30 p 

f7:00A San Jose and way stations 7. 30 P 

^7:00 a New Almaden 1 /4:10 p 

X 7:15 A Monterey Excursion - J8:30 p 

8:00 A Coast Line Limited— San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Salinas, San 

Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Lob Aneeles and Principal Inter- 
mediate stations 10:45 p 

9:00 A San Jobb, Tres PInos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Salinas, San 

Luis Obispo, and principal intermediate stations 4:10 p 

10:80 A San Jose and way stations ■- 8:36 A 

11*80 A San Jose. Los GatoB and way stations 5:30 1* 

01:30 p Sau Jose and way stations 07:00 P 

t2:00 P San Jose and way stations , fs:0f, a 

13 00 pDel Monte Express— Only stops San Jose +12*01 p 

3 30 P San Mateo, Redwood. Palo Alto. Santa Clara, San Jose, Tres 

Plnos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Del Monte. Monterey, and Pactne 

Grove 10:45 A 

4:80 p San Jose and principal way stations ... ] ;30 p 

t5:00 P San Jose, Los Gatos, and principal way stations .,„ 9J0O a 

6:80 P San Joae and principal w*.y stations ...10 01a 

f6:l5 p San Mateo. Belmont, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto......... T6H6 a 

6:30p San Joae and way stations _ 6 ''33 A 

7:00p New Orleans Express — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbpra.Los' 

Angeles. Denilng, El Paso, New Orleans, and East... 10-15 a 

«11:15 p Palo Alto and way stations t9:45 P 

ail:45p San Jose and way stations _ ."'.' 19.45 j> 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. t Sundays exoepted- 
1 Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 
©Saturday and Sunday only. ^Monday only. 
"Daily except Saturday. 



The Union Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Telephone, Exchange 8?. Enquire of Ticket Agents 
for Time Cards and other Information. 



Chicago in less than 3 Days 



FROM SAN FRANCISCO 

CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 



AT 10 A. M. 



NORTH-WESTERN LINE 



Double Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars, Buflet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars— meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions ev err 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 

R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617Market St. Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



CAL. N. W. RY. CO., Le "»" S. F. «"<» N. P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tmotok Fiaay - Foot of Market Street 
S5 E ^J? AY ?T 7:30 ' 9:0 °- U:0 ° "•"•: "*>• »:W. 6:10. 6:80 p.m. Thursdaye- 
JmJnT'JS 8 '. 1 ^ y i , Saturdaya-Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:50 T.u. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 8:80. 11:00 A.M.; 130, 3:80, 5:00, 6:20 P.M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 
WEEK DAY»-e:lo, 7:50, 930. 11:10 a.m.: 12:46. SAO, 5:15 p.m. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:85 P.M. ' 
3UNDAYS-8:10. 9:40 11:10 a.m., 1:40,8:40 5:06, 8:25 p.m. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule aa above. 



Leave San Franol.oo | In Effect Apr. 28, 1901 


Arrive at San Pranolsoo 


Week daya 
7:80 am 
330 PM 
6:10 pm 


Sundaya Destinations 
8:60 AM Novate 
9:30 am Petaluma 
5:00 PM 1 Santa Koaa 


Sundaya 
10:40 AM 

6:05 Pm 
7:36 pm 


Week daya 

8:40 am 

10:25 AM 
6:20 PM 


730 AM 

3:80 pm 


5:00 PK 
8:00 AM 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsbure, Lytton, 

Geysorvtllo. Oloverdale 


10:40 am 
7:35 Pm 


1035 AM 

_6:20 pm 
10:25 AM 
6:20 Pm 


7:30 AM 

8:30 pm 


8 :00 am 1 Hopland. TJklah 


10:40 AM 
7:36 pm 


7:30 am 
130 PM 


8l00 AM I _ _ 
5:00 pm | GuernevlUe 


10:40 AM 1 10:26 AM 

7:35Pm 1 6:20 pm 


730 AM 
5:10 Pm 


8:00 am 1 Sonoma 
5:00 pm | Olen Ellen 


9:15 am I 8:40 am 
6:05 PM 1 6:20 PM 


7:80 am 
8:30 PM 


8:00 am 1 

6:00 Pm 1 Sebastopol 


10:40 All 1 10:26 AM 
7:36 PM | 6:20 PM 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



Bteamers leave San Fran- 
cisco as follows: 



W ., Por Ketchikan, Juneau, Trendwell's, Douglas City. 

'W Skagiiay. etc, Alaska, II a.m. : July 6 . 10, 15. 20, 25, 30: AnJ 

^■JQk^^ I. Chance to company's steamers at Seattle 

K*V) 5. 10 F °15.?0,£,n? d A^T l S ° Und F ° rt8 ' " *■ "■ JU ' 5 ' 

^^B| 16 21°2 r 6 3 l" Aug ( f umbo,<it Bar) ' 1:S0 *• "■ Jul* l.«. 11 

a „ tm "^. for Loa AneeUs (via Port Loa Angeles and Bedondo). 

«. ^ e ^,. " nd ganta Barbara, "Santa Rosa," Sundays. 9 a" m • 
State of California. Thursdays: 9 a. m. ■*»»•> -. . 

o. F ? r £?* A ?£ e ' .*' vl " l an ?. edro and Easl 8an Padro, lanta Barbara. 
Santa Cruz, Monterey. San Simeon. Oayuooa, Port Harford (San Luis 
Obispo) Ventura, Hueneme, and 'Newport. ('Corona onlv? 

Corona. 9a. m„ July 5. 13. 21, 29.: Aug 6 oniy.j 

Cooa Bay. 9 a. m„ July 1. 9, 17, 25: Aue. 2. 

For Mexican Porta, 10 a.m., 7th of each month. 

For further Information obtain folder. 

Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel) 
QOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agta. 
C. D. DUNANN. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

10 Market St., San Francisco. 




I 8 , ..ycn'nra," for Auatralla, Thurs. July 24, lOa.m 
S3 Alameda." for Honolulu, Sat. Aug. 2, J p. m* 
S3 ' Australia." for Tahiti, Tues , Aug. 20, 10 a. m' 
Line to Ooolgardie, Australia, and Capetown- 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPREOKELS & BROS. CO. 
Agents, 643 Market Street. Freight Office, "327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 



The Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 

Incorporated Under Royal Charter 1840. 
—AND— 

Compania Sud-Americana De-Vapores 

First-Class Twin Screw Passenger Steamers 

From SAN FRANCISCO fo Mexico. Central America, Panama, Guayaquil 

Callao, Valparaiso, and all Ports on the East and West 

Coast of South America. 

Sailing from Howard 3. Pier 10, 12 M- 

^e:::::z=::~:::.::::z::=:~A1:^ 

Theae steamere are built expressly for Central and South American "pas- 
Call'fornia'stre'et ohanee Bt Panama.) Freight and passenser office, 316 
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., General Agents. 




Illinois Central 
Railroad 



EFFICIENTLY SERVES 
A VAST TERRITORY 



DIRECT CONNECTION WITH 

OVERLAND LIMITED at Omaha for Chicago and points East- 

with SUNSET LIMITED at New Orleans for Louiiville, 

Cincinnati and points East. 

FOUR PERSONALLY CONDUCTED EXCURSIONS WEEKLY 



W. H. SNEDAKER, GENERAL AGENT 

64S Markd ft., fan Fiaccleco, Cal. 



Prict. 10c p«r cop>. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1»B. 

can rRMieit eo 



Annual Subscription, t-4.00 



Ne > vs^fo^rHR 




Vol. LXV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 26, 1902. 



Number 4. 



The Sin Frenrisc.. NEWS LETTER Is printed cuid Published every Satur- 
day by the proprietor, Frederick Marriott, Ila'leck building, 331 Sansome 
street. Sen Francisco. Cal 

Eatcred at S in Francisco PostofHee as aecond-olass mutter. 

New York ofllce — I where Information may be obtained recardine subscrip- 
tions and advrrlislnei 2>SBrosdway, C. C. Mnrphy tcpresenlatlvc 

London offlee — 30 Cornhlll, E. C. England. Georeo Street A: Co. representa- 
tive. 

Boeton— 36 Bloomfteld street. W. H. Pareett representative. 

All social items, announcements, advertising or other matter. Intended lor 
pab I cation In the current number of the NEWS LETTER should be sent 
to this office not later than 5 p. m Thursday previous to day of Issue, 



All were disappointed that M. 
come to New York in his airship. 



Santos-Dumont did not 



"Trust America." Pope Leo is reported to have said. It 
would be interesting to know if he used the word "trust" 
as an adjective. 



The highbinders who are holding up gambling houses in 
Chinatown ought to be thanked for their efforts to suppress 
fan-tan. 



The resolve of the Chicago college girls to refrain from 
kissing will have a great tendency to discourage co-educa- 
tion. 



A Kansas woman committed suicide Saturday because her 
daughter-in-law would not allow her to drown her. Some 
people are so sensitive. 



Better not monkey with that Bartlett Springs' stage rob- 
ber. He may turn out to be another Tracey, and put the 
State to a big expense. 



The recent riot of soldiers in Leavenworth, Kansas, shows 
us that we can get along very well without a standing army 
to protect our commonwealth. 



Emil Fisher, friend of the girl who committed suicide in 
San Rafael, may be innocent, but he will have a hard time 
convincing the public that he is a gentleman. 



King Leopold of Belgium is investing his capital and ex- 
perience in rubber. His capital is all right, but his experi- 
ence is limited to rubbering over the footlights. 



Japanese coolies are attacking Methodist missionaries 
in Korea. The Japanese are a very progressive people, and 
are doubtless anxious to set Korea an example. 



The temptation is strong to perpetrate a pun on the name 
of Mrs. Bottcher, who bungled in her attempt to smuggle 
in several thousand dollars worth of Jananese goods. 



John Oscar Ericson, the sailor who broke his neck diving 
at the Sutro baths, may never fully recover, but he will be 
permanently cured of the habit of diving into shallow water. 



The Campanille, a valuable Venetian antique, fell over, 
not so long ago and smashed several Venetians. Like many 
another Italian antique, the Campanille was much safer 
in a photograph than in real life. Now Mr. Giovanni Morosini, 
a wealthy New York banker, has given $100,000 to rebuild 
the famous tower. It will be several centuries before Mr. 
Morosini's restoration will be a real antique, but mean- 
while Venice may go to church without dodging bricks. 



The Indians in the northern part of the State have been 
helping civilization along this week by killing each other 
off. 



The dailies are wrong in announcing that a Pennsylvania 
politician is "charged" with stealing a quarter of a mil- 
lion dollars. He should be credited with it. 



Rev. Jean Skyles, the Christian preacher, who, at the 
age of thirty-three, has a record of six wives, all living, 
adopted the wrong religion. He should have been a Mor- 
mon. 



A French count was mistaken for a swindler in Vancouver 
this week, and placed under arrest. The mistake is such 
a natural one that the Vancouver authorities should not 
be censured. 



The San Rafael Judge who decided that the Sausalito 
pool-rooms are not, in themselves, public nuisances, is prob- 
ably the only citizen of Marin county who has noticed that 
fact. 



The officers who allowed Tracy to escape have the satis- 
faction of having wounded him — or at least, they have the 
satisfaction of saying they did, and are not a bit afraid 
that Tracy will show up to dispute their assertions. 



Rev. J. A. B. Wilson's statement that it takes nerve and 
character to stand for prohibition will be received with 
surprise by the general public, most of whom had supposed 
that lack of brains was the principal requirement. 



The reported estrangement between Sir Henry Irving and 
Mrs. Terry, and the recent announcement that they are to 
tour this country together, show that Sir Henry still ap- 
preciates the value of advertising and has a resourceful 
press agent. 



The story of captivity told by Attorney Hinckley of Los 
Angeles does not prove that truth is stranger than fiction, 
but it reveals an imagination that must make this legal 
gentleman an object of envy to his professional brethren. 



The East has been afflicted with hot weather, and cloud- 
bursts, and now Bryan has started for the afflicted section 
on a speaking tour. The West is free of scourges just at 
present, but if given its choice would prefer the torrid 
weather and cloudbursts to the Democratic disturber. 



Mr. Thomas Walsh, an abruptly wealthy millionaire of 
Colorado, recently dined thirty French noblemen in Paris, 
thus breaking the record previously set by Mr. William 
Waldorf Astor of the Pall Mall Magazine and Mr. Richard 
K. Fox of the Police Gazette. 



It is said that American irrigation is so changing the cli- 
mate of Egypt that the Sphinx is fast decaying and will 
tumble within a few years. Never mind. The Monument 
Trust will have another one made at Grand Rapids, Michi- 
gan. It will be a nice, new Sphinx, warranted not to rust, 
crumble or tarnish, and to keep in any climate. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 



AS TO TAXING FRANCHISES. 
At a recent meeting of the Board of Supervisors, sitting as 
a Board of Equalization, an application by the Bank of 
California and by Wells, Fargo & Company, asking that 
assessments levied upon their alleged franchises be stricken 
from the role, was refused. This is an action that must 
be regretted by every person who has the best interests 
of the municipality at heart. The assessment of franchises 
of this sort is an invention of Assessor Dodge, who views 
everything from the standpoint of a ward politician. As a 
matter of simple fact, neither the Bank of California nor 
Wells, Fargo & Company, nor a great number of other cor- 
porations which have been similarly assessed, have a fran- 
chise that is liable to taxation, and though they may pay 
under protest the taxes thus levied upon them, the <it.\ 
will eventually have to repay the same. Nothing, there- 
fore, is gained by thus flying in the face of reason and 
violating every instinct of natural justice. These cor- 
porations have really no franchises that are susceptible of 
taxation. There are very few corporations in San Francisco 
to-day that have franchises that are capable of taxation. 
The street railroads, the telephone company and the tele- 
graph companies are the only ones we can think of. Origin- 
ally the water company and the gas and electric light com- 
panies used to have franchises of this nature, but since 
the charter has given every person who makes the requisite 
deposit with the Board of Public Works the right to lay 
pipes and wires through the streets, these companies have 
no taxable franchises now. They have no exclusive fran- 
chise which amounts to a property or thing of value. That 
is the crucial test of this whole matter. Does the franchise 
create or convey a special privilege? Originally the right 
to incorporate was a franchise because it was a special 
privilege created by a special act of legislation. In mod- 
ern times, however, there are general incorporation laws 
under which anybody and everybody may organize. The 
corporate existence which is thus gained is still technically 
known to the law as a franchise, but it is not such a fran- 
chise as can be taxed because it is not a property. It has 
no value. It is simply a common right. There are prob- 
ably a thousand mercantile establishments in San Fran- 
cisco whose proprietors are conducting business as corpora- 
tions. More than two-thirds of these have never had their 
franchises assessed. It is only when he comes to dealing 
with the large corporations that Dr. Dodge sees the value 
of the franchise; yet the franchise of the meanest sand 
and sawdust company is as valuable intrinsically as the so- 
called franchise of Wells, Fargo & Company or the Bank of 
California. The levying of these taxes is manifestly illegal, 
and the only thing that can be accomplished by them is 
the harassment and annoyance of the intitutions af- 
fected. 



SMOTHER THESE HUMBUGS. 
Professional anti-monopolists, professional friends of the 
people, and professional foes of corporations constitute one 
of the evils from which California has long suffered. The 
evil has considerably abated, and with a little effort may be 
eliminated. Upon the other hand, if it is given the slight- 
est encouragement, it is likely in these days of prosperity 
to again come to the front as an element of depression, aim- 
ing solely at its own self-aggrandizement and usually attain- 
ing nothing more than the discouragement of capital 

which means the retardment of our development. We are 
led into this train of reflection by observing that Denis 
Kearny, the poor drayman who became rich by abandoning 
honest work in order to become a professional workman, 
has been writing letters to the Board of Supervisors re- 
garding the "over-capitalization" of the United Railroads. 
This fellow is personally insignificant, but he represents 
a type. Another of the same stripe is Thomas Howard Smith, 



who seem to have got the United Railroads and the Arou- 
stein case mixed up very much as Mr. Dick got King Charles' 
head mixed up very much with his petition. Mr. Smith 
speaks of the Aronstein case as having put "virility" into 
"many admirable provisions of our State Constitution." 
It is a pity that he did not define more specifically what 
provision he referred to, because such a definition would 
probably disclose the fact that he meant those .provisions 
which in 1880 drove millions upon millions of capital out of 
the State, discouraged many other millions from coming in, 
and thus retarded our growth and development at least a 
decade. To be sure, many of these provisions have been 
repealed, but some of them still remain. Passing that point, 
however, it is to be noted that Mr. Smith appears to gloat 
over the fact that the decision in the Aronstein case ap- 
plies to the United Railroaas in some unfavorable way. As 
the decision merely holds that foreign corporations doing 
business in the State must maintain a fully equipped office 
here, and as the United Railroads maintains such an office 
it is difficult to understand what he means. We have not 
space to follow him through the abusive tirade of insinuation 
and false reasoning with which he assails the new company. 
Smith, like Kearny, is important only as a representative 
of a class that must be put down if the community is to 
prosper. The United Railroads is a corporation which 
has purchased a property for twenty millions of dollars. That 
property it has mortgaged for many more millions, which 
were to be invested in betterments. Already the company 
has been driven in disgust from the execution of a part of 
ics plans and property owners have thereby been injured. 
How long is this kind of thing to go on? We are frantically 
looking for men of means to develop Northern California, but 
how can we expect men of means to come where m< a oi 
means are met with abuse and misrepresentation? 



LIPTON TO TRY AGAIN. 

There is luck in odd numbers, so Sir Thomas Lip ton, the 
old sport, but new baronet, appears to think. What he failed 
to do with two Shamrocks he is determined to accomplish 
if possible with a third. That the thing is possible may be 
conceded, or it would be idle to invite competition. Whether 
a yacht built staunch enough to cross the Atlantic, can ever 
expect to defeat our "skimming dishes" that never venture 
outside their own waters, is another question about which 
experts disagree. Sir Thomas evidently thinks the thing 
can be done, or he would not keep on trying to do it. His 
faith is great, and his perseverance is unbounded. The man 
who has conquered so many difficulties does not like to admit 
even to himself that he is at last face to face with a task 
that is too much for him. It must be conceded that he has 
some ground for hoping that he may ultimately succeed. 
The defeat of Shamrock II was by a mere neck, as it were, 
and there is no reason why it should dishearten her ever- 
hopeful owner. There is no doubt that in the Constitution 
we have about the best our yacht builders can do. They 
ventured upon two attempts to build a boat to beat her. but 
failed. On the other hand. Shamrock II was always close 
up, and in the last event came in first, but was defeated bj 
a few seconds on time allowance. She suffered a by no means 
disgraceful defeat. If Sir Thomas can get a yacht built 
to outsail her, he can beat the Constitution. If he cannot, 
he may as well save his time and his money by staying 
at home. He is fortunate in now having the means of test- 
ing his capacity right at hand. If he crosses the Atlantic 
again, he will come with his newly acquired honors thick 
upon him. The favorite of his King, for whom he fed half 
a million of London's poor without a bitch or mischance of 
any kind, he will come to us as a Baronet, and not as a 
Knight, as before. Better than that: he will come as the 
same jolly good fellow that the American people long sine 
called him. We shall try to keep the cup all the same. 



July 26. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



OUR COMPETITORS ON THE PACIFIC. 
Our English rivals ara pntttl - 

rs to maintain their 
of the inadn with 

Australia. N ind, FIJI, ami other Island! 

• laid, nnd be in running i 

In the new year, it will be an all-Bngllsb route, which 

■ it to patronise. Our trade with the 

Itritlfi tipodea baa been growing rapldlj 

during the past two or till and now amounts to 

one-third that ol England. There la some Question 

ran hold what we have gained. It is in that 

thai the British enterprises now under way are import 
ant. The Canadian-Australian steam line is at once to be 

ed with much larger ami Faster vessels. The Gov- 
ernments Interested have called tor bids In Liverpool and 
London for steamers capable of maintaining an eighteen 
knot Bervice between Vancouver and Brisbane. The- route 
is to be very much shortened by Bide-tracking New Zealand. 
which, taov be connected with Hie main line by 

means of smaller Bteamers running to one of the islands. 
liy increasing the speed and decreasing the distance, our 
rivals will put upon ns the necessity of doing something 
further and other than we are now doing, if we are to hold 
our own. Our merchants and steamship men will have to 
look into this. What effect the death of MV. Mackay will 
have upon the laying of the cable from San Francisco to 
Honolulu and Manila, is not yet positively known. It is 
a large undertaking that will cost much money and yield 

little return. Nobody as yet is committed to anything 
in regard to it. Nothing has been done that cannot be un- 
done, and it would not be surprising if Mr. Mackay's heirs 
were to abandon the scheme, in which case nothing can be 
done until Congress meets again. The Government should 
make inquiries, and let the country know where it stands. 



water works. For the lasi irs their Income has 

■ :r.s, while the other tide of the ledger tl 

a total of |j. 171. n.:. leaving only a balance ol $17:',.' 
make repairs an, i betterments thai must 

ii millions. Philadelphia owned bar own gaa worgs 
for years. They were operated at a lost of $400,000 per 
annum. In lvT the) were leased to a private corporation 
for thirty years. The terms of tta [Ulres the i 

to spend ?■">. in betterments within three years and 

'.nuii during the entire term. The city now receives 
"i per annum in rent and has all its streets and pub- 
lic buildings lighted tree. The city of Hoston under Mayor 
Quincy, established a printing office which In five years 
time lost over J lii.uiiii directly and an unknown amount in- 
directly. In 1893 Detroit undertook to establish an electric- 
light plant. It was to cost $600,000, and be completed in 
1894. It was not completed until 1897, and cost $790,1 r, I. 
A private corporation offered to supply the city with lights 
for $102.20 per lamp each year. The cost under municipal 
ownership is $131 per lamp, and the citizens have a public 
mortgage (with all the depreciation of value that that car- 
riea with ill on their properties, amounting to $600,0011. We 
have many like illustrations, but enough has been set out 
in this article to cause taxpayers to pause and think. 



PAUSE AND THINK ABOUT GEARY STREET. 
Primarily the property owners whose holdings lie along 
the route of the Geary street railroad or adjacent there. o. 
are the people who are principally interested in securing 
the defeat of the scheme of the politicians to transform the 
road in question into a patronage producing auxiliary to 
their machine; but every other taxpayer in the city is deeply 
though not so directly involved. The success of this scheme 
will open the door to a raid on the taxpayers' pockets, the 
limits of which may be conjectured but cannot be accurately 
measured. It will open with the creation of a bonded 
indebtedness, which will be a mortgage upon all proper,./ 
real and personal in this city and county. The taxpayers 
will become responsible for this debt; the tax-eaters will 
proceed to enjoy it. So far San Francisco has succeeded in 
keeping herself clear of a permanent or bonded indebted- 
ness, and the high values maintained by property in our 
midst has been largely owing to the fact that there is no 
public mortgage on it. This result has not been secured 
without a struggle. It has been a continuous struggle, too, 
for the tax-eaters have sought to get at the treasury by every 
device they could think of. This public utility scheme, of 
which the Geary street job is the pioneer, is but a contin- 
uation of these efforts to loot the taxpayers. It is care-f 
fully wrapped up in a number of attractive-looking false 
pretenses. For instance, we have been told that the cor- 
porations which operate the public utilities make substan- 
tial profits in doing so, and that the municipality could do 
the same. But this is not true. Every effort of the Gov- 
ernment (either national, State or municipal) to engage in 
business enterprises has ended in financial failure. The 
News Letter has already pointed to the transport service, 
the State Printing Office at Sacramento, and the San Fran- 
cisco street department as conspicuous examples of this. 
But there are other and even more apropos illustrations 
at hand. Kansas City, for instance, has long owned her own 



THE PIOUS FUND. 



The much-talked-of "Pious Fund" of the early California 
friars, now claimed at this late day by the Pope, was partly 
taken away by some of the friars wtten they left the country. 
It is a matter of history that the friar in charge of San 
Luis Obispo Mission took away in his flight a large sum 
of gold hidden in casks of olives. This sum is estimated 
at $50,000, and some of the early settlers give the fleeing 
padre credit for a larger sum. When the securlarization 
took place, all the friars abandoned their missions; the In- 
dians destroyed the crops, some of the cattle were disposed 
of, and it is reliably stated that in one instance the garden 
of a Mission was destroyed, the priest assisting in the work. 
Most of the friars left full-handed, and only the lands, cat- 
tle and buildings were left for the Mexican Government. 
This property was mostly "absorbed" by the administrators. 
The disappearance of the Pious Fund, so-called, is a matter 
between the Mexican Government, its administrators of 
the Mission, and the friars, who deserted the missions and 
left the Indians to their fate, when their establishments 
were reduced from principalities to mere parish churches. 
The matter was disposed of before the American conquest, 
and the treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo cannot be construed 
so as to cover matters settled before the Gringo came. 



WHY WOMEN QUACKS FLOURISH. 

There has been another death in San Francisco as a re- 
sult of malpractice, the victim being a Matilda Karlson, 
who before she died claimed that a woman had committed 
a criminal operation upon her. At present writing the 
charge has not been proven; but enough such cases have 
occurred to make it a question whether or not the law mak- 
ing abortion a criminal operation is wise or not. The law as 
it stands at present makes it almost impossible to secure 
the services of a reputable physician to perform such an 
operation, and consequently the city is full of women who, 
under the guise of clairvoyants, palmists, fortune-tellers, 
etc., make abortion their trade, and are -responsible for 
scores of deaths. The operation, if skillfully performed, is 
comparatively harmless, but these women are without the 
skill to either perform the operation correctly or to attend 
the patient afterward. Would it not be well to amend the 
law so that any regularly licensed physician should be al- 
lowed to perform an abortion if he thought it necessary, as 
it sometimes is? It would drive these nefarious women out 
or business, and would decrease the death roll. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 



Reminiscences No. 18 




By an Old Newspaper Man. 

The death in London of Mr. 
The Passing Away of John W. Mackay ends the career 
the Bonanza Firm. of the last of the quartet of mil- 
lionaires who in the seventies 
came to he known as "the Bonanza firm." They discovered 
in Virginia City, in the State of Nevada, the largest and 
richest body of silver ore of which the world has any 
record. Their two mines, the Consolidated Virginia and the 

California yielded 
for a considerable 
time bullion of 
^^ the net value of 

$10,000,000 per 
month. Of course 
at that rate of 
production it did 
not take the part- 
ners long to be- 
come enormously 
rich. Great, how- 
ever, as their 
find was, it was 
given out to be 
much greater 
than it really was. 
It was proclaimed 
from the house- 
tops and through 
Mr. John W. Mackay. the columns of 

the daily press that the Virginia City Bonanza would last 
longer than the then existing generation. These statemen s 
were spread far and wide, and exercised the Governments cf 
the world as to the coming value of their silver money. The 
United States thought it prudent to demonetize silver, and 
in consequence the 100-cent dollar soon fell to be worth 
intrinsically only fifty cents, and the many attempts made 
since then to raise it to its former market value have 
proven failures. England closed her Indian mints against 
silver, and the rupee, which at the time was the standard 
money of the country soon greatly depreciated, to the great 
loss and inconvenience of the poor people of India. The mat- 
ter of coining and circulating silver dollars at the old ratio 
oi sixteen of silver to one of gold, became a burning politi- 
cal issue in this country, and it will forever lemain notable 
as one of the freaks of democracy that nearly one-half of the 
voters of the United States cast their ballots in favor of 
their Government paying one hundred cents worth of gold 
for fifty cents worth of silver. It was a craze, which nistory 
will find it difficult to account for. But the times were 
hard, and there were perhaps some truth in the wide- 
spread belief that the depreciation in the purchasing power 
of the silver dollar had something to do with the prevailing 
condition of things. That issue is, however, practically dead 
now. The return of prosperous times has killed it. 

It has fallen to the lot of no four 
How the Value of the men who ever lived to exercise 
Bonanza Was Inflated, so large an influence upon the 

world's money as did the Bo- 
nanza firm. Had they but let the truth he known, there 
need have been but very little, if any, disturbance of values. 
Had it been known that the two mines would be exhausted 
within two years, no alarm would have been felt. India 
and China alone could easily have taken our surplus silver 
and returned par value for it. The money centers would, 
in that case, have taken care of the market and all would 
have been well. But money is a coward. It took fright at 
the unseen and the unknown, and, as it proved, at the non- 



existent. The alarm once taken is not easily allayed. The 
financial world to this day fears the possibilities of silver 
discoveries on this continent, and plays what it thinks is 
the safest game, which is to buy silver, like any other com- 
modity, at its market value, and not at the fictitious price 
a Government may choose to stamp upon its face. Our 
Government bought more silver under the Sherman law than 
it could redeem in gold if called upon. The Treasury vauits 
are full of it, and it is destined to cause trouble some day, 
about which it is perhaps wise not to say anything. Sufficient 
unto the day is the evil thereof. The object of the men 
who so overstated the wealth of the Bonanza mines was, of 
course, to rig the stock market. Con-Virginia, which at one 
time could have been bought at four or five dollars a share, 
finally rose to ?850 a share. It would take a large volume 
to tell of the various tricks that were resorted to to hum- 
bug and fool the public into bringing about that enormous 
inflation. It is an open secret that the Bonanza firm made 
more money in operating the stocks than they d- .. 
in working the mines. • The astonishing result came lo 
this: that four men got up a gambling lottery with a prize 
at the back of it, the value of which was only known to 
themselves, and managed to disturb the finances of the 
world. The South Sea bubble was nothing to it. 

The Bonanza firm consisted of 
Working the Mines. John W. Mackay, J. C. Flood. 

James G. Fair, and William S. 
O'Brien. All of them were Irishmen. Mackay and Fair 
were legitimate miners and partners, doing business together 
in the State of Nevada. They were working without know- 
ing it on the top of the Bonanza with but very moderate 
results. The time came when they felt the need of more 
capital, and as the outcome of a talk they happened to have 
by chance in a saloon in San Francisco, they let in Messrs. 
Flood and O'Brien as partners. Mr. O'Biien was not much 
of a business man, and paid but slight attention to "the 
little venture," as he called it, and Mr. Flood's chief remark 
was that "with luck the speculation might provide him 
with a little extra money." Messrs. Flood and O'Brien 
were looked upon as good fellows, and their house attracted 
much of the custom of miners on a visit to the city. "Points" 
were thus obtained that led to the firm dabbling in stocks, 
with some little success, until at last they joined hands 
with the two Virginia City miners, and the Bonanza dis- 
covery soon followed. John W. Mackay and James G. Fair, 
to a lesser extent, deserved their good fortune. They were 
both practical miners, stuck to their business, made the 
underground workings of their mines one of the wonders 
of the world, and modestly reaped their reward. Mr. Flood 
took to operating the stock market and to "bleeding the 
street" as naturally as a duck takes to water. He engineered 
the deals, hired the clacquers who were to be found around 
the hotels and wherever men did most congregate, and he 
paid the puffers for as dexterous work of its kind as was 







July 26. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



BJ wl.-lilors ..f the pencil. Mr 
as groat In bis way as Mr. Maokay »n» in Ms. but 
was a vast amount of difference In ihrlr ways v 
died about the time the tionama was worked ou( Mi 
lived somewhat longer, and \.r Pair died In. 
Now my. Mackay la no mora, it la believed tbal 
combined fortune! ware between $200,000,000 ami 

000,000. 

Mr. Miu-kay was easily the toremosl 

Mr. Mackaythe man of the firm. What, if any part, he 

Foremost Man. had in advising the various stock deals 

that brought Messrs. Flood and O'Brien 
more notoriety than glory, has never been known. The only 
thing certain is that he did not appear on the street or at 
the stock exchanges, and seemed to Live the whole business 
a wide berth. He rarely visited San Francisco, but devote I 
himself to the developing of the mines. He is known to 
have on more than one occasion, recouped out of his own 
pocket losses sustained by friends through the stock manip- 
ulations of his partners. It has long been understood that 
he did not approve of the many stories that were put forth 
from time to time to affect the stock market. Mr. Mackay, 
by the way, was the only one of the four men who main- 
tained his mental balance to the last hour of his life. Mr. 
O'Brien was not himself for a year or two before he died. 
Mr. Flood was ailing for quite a while, and made the 
mistake of sticking to business when quite unfit for it. He 
permitted his bank cashier to handle his millions without 
oversight or check, and as a result soon found the bank 
in difficulties for want of coin. The cashier had com- 
mitted the concern to a wild scheme to corner the visible 
supply of wheat of the whole country, and did not stop 
until the bank's entire capital was tied up. Mr. Flood, ly- 
ing in his sick room at Menlo Park, was applied to for more 
money, and it then began to dawn upon him for the first 
time that something was wrong. His family cabled to 
Mr. Mackay in London to come here forthwith, which he 
did. He took hold, straightened out matters, redeemed all 
the cashier's wheat contracts, and in the end it was found 
that a loss of $10,500,000 had been made. All this was 
done without noise enough to ripple the street, and the 
Nevada Bank being placed under competent management, 
lives and thrives to this day. Mr. Mackay continued to 
own his one-half interest in it. Of Mr. Fair's eccentricities 
during the last three or four years of his life the courts 
have told us only too much. He was clearly off his balance. 
Unwarned by Mr. Flood's experience, he, too, entered into ' 
a speculation to corner wheat, and lost over $5,000,000; yet 
he left to his heirs an estate officially appraised at over 
$30,000,000. Mr. Mackay's fortune is estimated at nearly 
three times that amount, but he has added to, rather than 
detracted from, the Bonanza millions. 

Mr. Mackay had no taste for what 
Children of Fortune, is called "society." He used to say 
that "society twaddle was only for 
those who had time to waste." He did not talk much, any- 
how, but when he did, he had a wonderfully imposing man- 
ner that impressed you with his entire truthfulness and sin- 
cerity, and that was perhaps one of the secrets of his suc- 
cess. The Bonanza firm was not distinguished as a whole 
for stating facts as they were. "Jim" Fair was a veritable 
Baron Munchausen. If Mr. Mackay did not care for society 
he had a bright and estimable wife who did. Some years 
ago she established herself in London and Paris, and be- 
came the owner of palatial residences in both capitals, and 
entertained on a scale hardly surpassed by royalty. Her 
social success has been something phenomenal. Her daugh- 
ters, after finishing their education, were "brought out," 
\hd soon found husbands among the higher nobility. She 
was at the bedside of her husband at his death, and tele- 



Krams from London mj that h« rompletelj 

trated ber. Their ion, Mr, Clarence Mackay, be 

heir to half of his Father's estate, and becomes mat 
of nil his business enterprises, for which be is believed to 
U equipped, his rather having specially prepared blm 

for his future sphere of usefulness. H of mourning 

will have to be brief, for work awaits him on every hand. 
The oable to Honolulu is just about to be laid, and the ex- 
tension to Manila was one of the things his father was 
busying himself over when death suddenly came to him. 
Tne trans-Atlantif cable and the telegraphic system of 
North America are largely under his control. It is a weighty 
burden for so young a man to have impose. 1 upon htm. He 
undoubtedly will carry it all right, if, as is reported, he 
inherits the passion of his father for commercial and Indus- 
trial expansion. It is to be said for the Bonanza men that 
their children have had a much better training than their 
fathers. Mr. Fair's daughters have married into two of 
the best families in New York, and his son, Charles, having 
sown his wild oats, has settled down to a life of propriety, 
if not exactly of piety. Mr. James Flood, with his mother 
and sisters, inherits his father's estate, and is managing it 
successfully. Everybody hereabouts knows and likes "Jim 
mie." He will do to bet on. For their fathers the book of 
life is closed. The last of the Bonanza firm is no more. 



BOORD'S 

OLD TOM, DRY 
& SLOE GINS 

ORANGE BITTERS, etc. 




CAT ON BARREL 
BRAND 



BOORD & SON 



LONDON. ENG. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents. 314 Sacramento St. S F. 



Ready Dinner Tube. 

Each tube contains 3 separate dishes, 
seasoning, etc. making a complete 
meal when cooked. 

15 pounds Weight of tubes, contains 
30 days provisions fo r cneman, 

Address, American Emergency Food Co. 

207 Battery St., S. F. Gal. 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LID,) OF ABHBDKEN? 



Scotch_Whisky 

importers • MACONDRAY & CO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 



CONCERNING THE LAWLOR "EXPOSE." 

That the Examiner and the anti-Gage rooters have delib- 
erately maligned Dr. Lawlor as a political dodge is pretty 
well proven by the fact that disinterested persons who 
have been connected with the Glen Ellen Home are unani- 
mous in declaring Dr. Lawlor's behavior during his superin- 
tendency as notable for kindness, wisdom and efficiency. 
As an earnest of this feeling the employees anil attaches of 
the Glen Ellen Home for the Feeble Minded met last Friday 
and presented the good doctor with a handsome loving cup. 
What could be a more eloquent refutation of the charges 
that Dr. Lawlor is criminal, prejudiced and brutal? A man 
is to be known by the attitude of his inferiors toward him, 
and the employees of Glen Ellen would certainly never so 
honor a superintendent who is "criminal, prejudiced and 
brutal." The News Letter this week is in receipt of some 
twenty letters from persons in every station of life — doctors, 
nurses, attendants, former inmates, relatives of former in- 
mates, and people familiar with the management of the 
Home, and all of these letters indignantly defend Dr. Law- 
lor, testifying to his humane treatment of inmates and bit- 
terly attacking the jackals who have sought to destroy him 
for political purposes. If the testimony of these letters is 
creditable — as it undoubtedly is — the slanderous daily 
newspapers should be made to suffer for the wrongs they 
have done an innocent man. We take pleasure in reprint- 
ing the letter which was presented to Dr. and Mrs. Lawlor, 
together with the token which signifies the affection with 
which the superintendent of Glen Ellen is regarded by his 
subordinates: 
"Dr. and Mrs. Lawlor, Our Superintendent and Our Matron: 

In behalf of the attendants, attaches and employees of 
this institution, whose hearts are with you. deploring the 
unkind, false, unjust and cruel statements recently made 
against you, and with our deepest regret at the attending 
outcome: We, who most sincerely appreciate your gentle- 
ness and kindness toward us during our association here 
together, combined with the devotion that exists between 
management and employee, deem it fitting and proper 
at this time, and it here becomes my pleasure and honor 
to present to you, and beg of you, to accept this little token 
expressive of our high regard, our esteem, our love for you, 
that you may feel and realize that we at least, who 
by daily association, are brought into closest contact with 
you and appreciate and admire the genuineness of your 
beautiful worth — a worth, dear friends, meritorious of the 
highest earthly reward — the approbation of your minds and 
hearts and consciences in knowing that you have performed 
and performed well your duty — a worth meritorious of that 
highest heavenly reward, "Well done, thou good and faith- 
ful servants" — God bless you. you and yours. 

CHARLES DE ST. MAURICE." 



Upon the application of Dr. J. G. B. Siegert & Sons, the 
United States Circuit Court, Northern District of Illinois, 
issued an injunction on June 26th last against the Julius 
Marcus Cordial Co., of Illinois, restraining them from using 
the words "Angostura Bark Bitters" or the words "An- 
gostura Bitters." or any imitation of said words on any bit- 
ters not manufactured by the complainants, Dr. J. G. B. 
Siegert & Sons. 



Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you'll save at 'east one-third on your fuel bill, 
'fhone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will receive 
prompt attention. 



Society people drop into Techau Tavern after the 

theatre. It is the place par excellence, and the good music 
furnished every evening is a great attraction. 



Last Sunday the first service was held in the Stanford 
Memorial church at Leland Stanford, Jr., University, which 
has just been completed, and which will be formally dedi- 
cated in September. Mrs. Stanford and Mr. Charles La- 
throp were among the large number who attended. This 
church is one of surpassing beauty, both inside and out, 
and a notable example of architecture and decoration. It 
is accredited with being the best church edifice of its size 
in the United States. The huge mosaic on the front gable 
of the structure, representing the Sermon on^tbe Mount, is 
very impressive. The figure of Christ in white stands boldly 
out, and He is surrounded by His disciples, women and chil- 
dren, and the sick and maimed. The entrance consists of 
three Romanesque archways, facing the gate of the Uni- 
versity, and the great memorial arch. The inside of the 
church is supremely beautiful, with its high vaulted ceiling, 
stained glass windows, mosaics, and notable paintings. The 
organ, the best in this country, has 3,000 pipes, and is of 
surpassing beauty and purity of tone. 



We do not look for any delicacy on the part of the Ha( k- 
men's Union, so the news that this body has done its ut- 
most to delay the funeral of the late General Barnes does 
not shock us so much as like outrage would from another 
quarter. The Hackmen's Union, like the Teamsters' Union, 
seems to be using its strength for purposes of public and 
private indecency. The Hackmen's Union and its capers 
has hitherto been a subject for public ridicule. In unitedly 
interfering in the burial of General Barnes, that body has 
passed the bounds of ridicule and laid itself open to the 
sternest censure. 



Mr. Edward H. Mitchell, the stationer and publisher, 225 
Post street, is placing on the market some extremely hand- 
some playing cards, with views of Oregon scenery printed 
on them. 



Carpet stores would make less money if all people 

had their carpets cleaned at Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning 
Works, 353 Tehama street. An occasional thorough clean- 
ing adds to the life of a carpet, and it cannot be done better 
than by Spaulding's modern methods. They call for and 
deliver goods and do work promptly. 



No sideboard Is quite complete without a bottle of "Jesse 

Moore" rye or bourbon whisky. It Is better than the kind you 
have always considered best. 



DR. S. F. LONG, Spring Valley Bldg., City, in 
a recent letter says: 

" For some Lime 1 have lieen duily using: Alloa Mineral Water, 
and llnd it indeed n very edeclual acid solvent and mo-l agreeable 
to lake. As a wholesome carbonated table water it has no superior." 

This is but one of the hundreds ot letters we have 
lately received from leading local physicians volun- 
tarily testifying to the excellent curative properties of 



^ETNA 



MINERAL 
WATER 

Bottled at Aetna Springs, Napa Co., CaL 

Phone AND * TNA MINERAL WATER co - 

ORDER 7 TENTH ST., 

SOllth 51 A CASE - SAN FRANCISCO. 



A fine quality of whisky is like a fine quality of anything 

else. It costs a little more, but nothing is too good for us 
Americans. Insist on having "Jesse Moore" Whisky. 



D t- Uw ^~». t- For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 

tin ISIll S tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners 
L/l ka^ji IVJ dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hangr- 
erB, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men. tar- 
roofers, tanners, tailors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BROS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 8acramento St., 8. F. Tel., 6(1 



July 26. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Volume T\w> of "The Jewish fcn- 

The Second Volume, cyclopedia" is at hand, and amply 
carries out the promise given in 
the first volume. It is a stupendous work. There will 
twelve volumes, eontalning 8.000 pages In all. and 2.000 
Illustrations. It is expected that the work will be com- 
pleted In 1906, and the estimated cost is $600,000. This 
eneyrlopedla is a complete index to anything, biographical, 
historical or otherwise, that one could wish to know- 
about the Jewish race, and is written with the utmost care 
and thoroughness. The publishers, in announcing it, say: 

"Generally encyclopedias are written and published mere- 
ly to sum up the status of the branch of science to which 
they are devoted. The Jewish Encyclopedia, like the people 
whose life-story it is destined to tell, is unique in that four- 
fifths of its material had to be created, collected and digested 
for this special purpose. 

"It is only within the last half century that any serious 
attempts have been made to render accessible the original 
sources of Jewish history scattered throughout the librar- 
ies of Europe. 

"Strange as it may seem, there is no country yet that 
possesses an adequate history of its Jews. Though of later 
years considerable activity has been shown in collecting ma- 
terial for such histories, there exists no comprehensive 
historical account of the Jews of Germany, Austria, France, 
Holland, England, Italy, Poland, or the United States, or 
even of such political divisions as Bohemia, Moravia, and 
Galicia, or of congregations of such historic importance as 
those of Amsterdam, Frankfort-on-the-Main, London, Prague 
or Wilna. Even voluminous, historical standard works 
like those of Bancroft, Macaulay, and Green, of Michelet 
and Thiers, of Schlosser and Ranke are absolutely silent 
about the history of the Jews of the epochs and countries 
they respectively treat. 

"The contributors to the Jewish Encyclopedia had then 
to create, not merely to compile, articles like Apulia, Arabia, 
Arad (Hungary), Aragon, Arkansas, Aries (France), Arme- 
nia, Arnheim (Holland), Aschaffenburg (Bavaria), Asia, 
Asolo (Italy), Atlanta (Georgia), Augustow (Russia), Aussee 
(Moravia), Australia and Austria, (to mention only a few 
topics treated in Volume II.), giving for the first time a 
comprehensive history of those continents, countries, and 
congregations, thus enriching not only Jewish but general 
historiography. The Jewish Encyclopedia is thus revealing 
for the first time in a comprehensive way, and for the 
entire world, the social, political, domestic and religious 
life of the Jewish people. 

"Two countries are focussing the attention of the world, 
as far as the Hebrews are concerned: Russia, the center 
of the old Jewish misery and slavery, and America, the land 
of activity and freedom: the land of the past and the land 
of the future; the latter harboring nearly one million of 
Jews, most of them hailing from the Empire of the Czars. 
The Jewish history, sociology, economics, and statistics of 
these two countries have hitherto been left almost uncul- 
tivated. There has, for example, been no attempt to present 
a comprehensive account concerning the foundation of the 
earliest Jewish communities, either in North or South 
America, or in the West Indies. The developmental stages 
through which Judaism has passed in America, although of 
extreme interest not only in themselves, but as promising 
to react upon the shaping of Judaism over all the world, 
have received but little attention." 

Funk & Wagnalls Co.. New York and London. Price 
per volume, $6.00. 



Virginia W. Johnson has writ:- 
A Lover of Italy. World's Shrine." descriptive ol Lake 
Como, Italy, it is a little volumi 
worth anyone'! time, written In a style harmonious with tue 

■object. Life on Como Is languorous i* 1 " 1 dnamy. and thai 
air pervades the book. It Is slightly biographical and his- 
torlcal, dealing to some extent with the younger Pliny, who 
was born on the shores of Como. 

Here Is a little bit. a fancy weaving of words, in which 
the author tells of a student who sat at twilight in a garden 
near one of the temples on the banks of Como: 

"The student was a prey to novel emotions, the unfolding 
of manhood in the 'vernal impulsion that makes lyrical all 
that hath language.' He sought the solitude of the neg- 
lected garden to avoid mere noisy companionship, and lis- 
ten to the nightingales reputed to haunt these thickets. 
Physical twilight is precious to all souls at times, accord- 
ing to Pater. The reclining nymph on the ledge held her 
broken urn, and the water flowed into a moss-stained basin 
below, with a gurgling, monotonous rhythm of sound. The 
nightingale poured forth a sudden, gushing melody from 
th 2 foliage, at once melancholy and rich. The cigarette 
smoke became a white cloud, and touched his eyelids. The 
flowing water, and the nightingale's note mingled in a 
blended undertone. Surely the shapes about stirred, the 
smoke was swept hither and thither into the semblance of 
a dancing movement of satyrs and naiads wending through 
the shrubbery. A range of rudely cut heads on a coping 
near the ground, which were sufficiently coarse to belong 
to the earthen vases of clay of the age of Numa, laughed. 
They were the little gods down among the roots and turf." 

With all its prose poetry and its tendency to ramble, the 
book contains much interesting information. ■ It will be a 
delight either to people who have visited Italy, or to 
people whose life dream is to do so. 

A. S. Barnes & Co., New York. Price, $1.20. 



TYRANT RULE OF LABOR. 
Trades unionism and its inseparable evils are mainly re- 
sponsible for checking the building boom which for some 
months past has followed the natural expansion of this 
city, due to a steadily increasing population. The demands 
of mechanics in this branch of industry are of such an arbi- 
trary description that only men of large means can afford 
the heavy expense of erecting buildings. Already the move- 
ment is slowing up, and it is only a matter of time until 
contractors will have few jobs on hand, and they will be 
of a class which cannot be delayed. Heading the list of 
high-priced labor come the lathers, who now demand and 
are paid from $7 to $7.50 per day. A brick-layer gets from 
$3.50 to $5, cement workers from $3.50 to $5, and finishers 
from $5 to $6 for every day they work. On top of this high- 
priced labor comes the inflated cost of material. Redwood 
boarding, large size, at one time considered dear at $20, now 
costs $52 per thousand feet, while rustic, quoted a fewi 
months ago at $27, now brings $47 per thousand feet. Lathes, 
which at the same period were worth $1.75, now sell for $3.75, 
and cement and lime are $1 higher than they were some 
time ago. In view of these facts, the moment does not seem 
altogether propitious for house-building, and it is little won- 
der that contractors are beginning to look askance at the 
future. In a case of this kind, it is not the capitalist who 
suffers, hut the poorer class trying to secure a home. It 
is they who are bled that united labor, arm in arm with 
the timber and other trusts, may prosper. Experience ever 
teaches that labor, always seeking sympathy by blatant 
appeals for relief from the tyranny of capital, is itself 
the greater tyrant of the two when chance offers. 



No danger of a bad complexion if you use Camelllnp. 

which is a perfect protective from the wind and sun. It is 
used and endorsed by Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, Adelina 
Patti and others. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 




azures 
Wand 

^GJeobty norland buf?/easure' s ■ "^-^ 



"The Wilderness" — the name hardly suggests a society 
play. It has rather a Central Theatre sound and calls up 
visions of villains and red fire. But "The Wilderness" is 
a society comedy, and mainly a good one. What it lacks 
in completeness it makes up in suggestion and the thought it 
induces. It is a merciless, pitiless satire, exaggerated to 
some degree to lend force. It portrays modern English so- 
ciety in rather a bad light, but has enough good people in 
it to save a shred of English society's reputation. 

The Duchess, Charlotte Braeme, and other novelists used 
to write stories of golden-haired women who married dark- 
haired, solemn men for their money and title, or of brunettes 
who married tall, fair-haired men with aristocratic noses and 
sweet yet firm mouths, shaded by drooping, golden mus- 
taches, for money and title. Sometimes one or both or 
neither loved, but it always turned out all right in the end. 
just as Mr. H. V. Esmond's play does. 

The plot of "The Wilderness" is like that of the novels de- 
scribed, but the people in it are more sane and natural, not 
quite so angelic, and modern and up-to-date. Besides, the 
heroine, Mabel Vaughan (Margaret Anglin) entered into the 
marriage with Sir Harry Milanor (M'r. Henry Miller) with 
her eyes open. Although only eighteen, she is cynical, hav- 
ing been taught from babyhood that to marry well is the 
only thing. She was not a victim of machinations, as the 
Duchess' heroines are, but deliberately set out to trap Sir 
Harry into a marriage with her, and succeeded. She had 
sort of imagined that she loved her caddish and poverty- 
stricken cousin, Jack Kennedy (Mr. William Courtleigh), 
and on the day of her engagement wrote him a flippant letter 
telling that she had landed her game. 

Contrary to expectations, she learned to love her husband 
sincerely, and their marriage turned out a very happy one, 
except that her conscience was always bothered by the fact 
that she had trapped him; so she determined to tell him the 
truth. The revelation, in the last act, makes a strong scene, 
giving Miss Anglin a chance for much good, very good, emo- 
tional work. 

"The Wilderness" has rather a queer effect. During its 
presentation it seems rather light and inconsequential, but 
after it is all over the impression of its worth and strength 
grows. It may be that the strong third act does this. The 
first act is merely pretty, light and frothy, showing a fash- 
ionable afternoon tea place. It is pleasing, bright and epi- 
grammatic, though, and serves to introduce the characters 
and define the plot. 

The first part of tne second act is offensive in its trivial- 
ity, almost silliness. It makes Sir Harry seem childish — 
in fact, the whole play has this effect. Sir Harry Milanor 
is anything but a strong character. He is good, true and 
noble, but is ultra-sentimental. No play is exactly pleas- 
ant, except to strong-minded females, in which the woman 
has all the strength of character. 

Mr. Miller plays Sir Harry well, following the author's 
purpose completely. He could make the last act a little 
more manly — yet Mr. Esmond has not painted a very manly 
man, and Mr. Miller is faithful to the playwright. He plays 
with ease and grace, and is thoroughly artistic. 

It is rather hard to give enough praise to Miss Anglin's 
work, not only in this play but in everything she does. Her 
sprightly, hard vivaciousness in the first act, her awaken- 
ing womanliness in the second, and her burst into full 
strength in the third, are delightfully graduated. She 
changes subtly, almost imperceptibly, and so convincingly 



that each change makes it hard to realize that she has shown 
any other side of her character. Miss Anglin has intelli- 
gence, beauty, ability, and magnetism, the attributes need- 
ful in an actress, and all highly developed. 

Mr. Miller's company gives excellent support. Mr. Wil- 
liam Courtleigh plays the caddish cousin admirably and 
with telling effect. Mr. Charles Walcott as Joseph Trevor 
is a life-like picture of the grumpy, yet kind-hearted, old 
man, acting with a naturalness that is charming. All the 
other members of the company acquit themselves with full 
credit. Little Gladys and Sybil Sorensen made an immense 
hit, receiving many curtain calls. 
■ » • 
Grand opera rehearsals have been going on at the Tivoli 
all week, and Monday night the season will open with 
"Aida," alternating through the week with "Lucia di Lam- 
mermoor." The music-loving public is eagerly awaiting the 
new singers, and from all reports they will not be disap- 
pointed, the general impression being that this company 
is the best that has ever been presented by the Tivoli man- 
agement. 

M\ich is expected of the new singers, and I hope and be- 
lieve that they will live up to their reputations. Ines De 
Frate, who sings Aida, is said to be a dramatic soprano of 
much purity and strength of tone, and Marie Pozzi, who will 
be Amneris, is a contralto of exceptional ability. Pietro 
Venerandi, who will be Radames, is new here, but is de- 
scribed as a tenor of great power and sweetness. Michele 
de Pavo is to sing Amanasro. Those who have heard him 
say that ne has a great baritone voice, and is an actor of 
ability. August Dado, well known here, will be the high 
priest. 

Tine de Spada will make her debut Tuesday night as 
Lucia. She is announced as an exceptionally good colora- 
tura singer. Anna Wilson, whose excellent mezzo-soprano 
voice was heard to advantage last year, is to sing Alice. 
Two new male singers. Alfredo Zonghi, baritone, and Emilio 
D'Albore, tenor, will make their initial bow in Lucia. The 
tenor is expected to make a sensation. 
• • ■ 

The offensive "Zaza" has given place to Shakespeare's 
beautiful comedy, "As You Like It," at the Alcazar. Whether 
Shakespeare or Florence Roberts is the drawing card I know 
not — but, at any rate, the Alcazar has been crowded all 
week. It is an agreeable change from the prurience of 
Zaza to the sweet wholesomeness of this woodland comedy. 
Instead of coarse passion coarsely told of, we have tender 
love delicately depicted — instead of horseplay we have 
bright and sparkling comedy; and no one can say but that 
actors and audiences benefit by the change. 

The Alcazar has put on As You Like It in good shape 
scenically, and has a cast which, though bad in spots, aver- 
ages pretty well. Miss Roberts as Rosalind is more than 
interesting. She has much to overcome in the way of tem- 
perament, being hardly lightsome enough for Rosalind. But 
she does the part intelligently, and at times with entire 
satisfaction to her hearers. Some of her woodland scenes 
with Orlando are above criticisms, and altogether her per- 
formance is one to be reckoned with. 

Mr. White Whittlesey is more of a success as Orlando. 
He has a fine stage presence and good looks as well as 
ability. He gives the part plenty of dignity where required, 
and is not lacking in the comedy parts. 

Mr. George Osbourne, sterling actor though he is. comes 
perilously near making an entire failure of Touchstone. 
There is nothing of the court jester except in his make-up. 
He is a heavy, soggy clown. Mr. Frank Bacon should have 
had this part, and would have made a success of it. As it 
was. he alternated in Corin and William, doing well In both. 
Mr. Carlyle Moore also "doubled up," playing Sylvius and 
Le Beau. He is especially good as the former. 

Mr. Henry Scbumer as Frederick acts with vigor and in- 



July 26. 19C2. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



Iclllgcnce. and Mr. Paul Gerson la kooiI no tho bai 
Duke. Mr. Howard Scott amounts to v.-ry little ns Ja 
Mls.« OeorRle Woodthorpe dOM Auiin-y with good, all 
rather too vigorous comedy, and Miss Oza Wkldrop is v.tjt 
charming as Phoebe Miss Bertha Blanclianl as Colli is one 
of the best In the cast; the part, loses none of Its value in 
her hands. 

• • • 

If you want to see a good comedy turn go to the Orpheum 
and listen to Yorkc and Adams, Hebrew comedians. "About 
the best ever" is the only description that tils them. They 
do Yiddish dialect in a manner thoroughly artistic, and what 
Is more, everything they do is new to San Franciscans. 
Their palmistry scene is one of the funniest things in vau- 
deville, and serves as a basis for a perfect rain of good 
jokes. They sing extremely well, too, and their make-up 
is perfect in every detail. 

Lew Hawkins, black-face comedian and monologist, is 
back, and is trying his level best to win applause with some 
very old jokes and some songs neither new nor good. His 
few new "gags" and his funny manner of telling them, make 
a hit; but even a good comedian cannot raise a laugh with 
ten-year-old almanac jokes. 

Ventriloquists are not so plenty now as they were a few 
years ago — and such good ones as Mr. A. O. Duncan never 
were plenty. The deception is very convincing. What is 
more, his funnyisms are not only unfamiliar but strictly 
up to date. 

* * * 

Did you ever eat "celebrated" gum-drops? They sell them 
at Fischer's Theatre — that is, three boys with buzz-saw 
voices perambulate through the audience howling that they 
have "celebrated" gum-drops, lemon-drops and chocolates 
for sale. Nobody has ever seen them sell over a dozen 
boxes in an evening, yet tney annoy over fifteen hundred 
people between the acts every night. "Pousse Cafe" is such 
good entertainment that the patrons like to talk it over 
between acts — and they don't enjoy having these noisy 
youths shouting out their celebrated wares. It seems to me 
that the management, being willing to put on a tip-top show, 
might also be willing to let its patrons enjoy it in peace. 

W,. J. W. 



"Pousse CafeV' "Antony and Cleopatra," and "A Royal 
Family," still continue at Fischer's. "Hurly Burly" is in 
preparation. 

• • a 

The Mazetti troup of acrobats, eight in number, will make 
their first San Francisco appearance at the Orpheum next 
week. Mr. Stephen Grattan, formerly leading man with 
Mr. Frohman's Lyceum company, and Maud White, Mr. Stu- 
art Robson's leading lady last year, will appear with a com- 
pany, presenting a comedy, "Locked Out at 3 A. M." Kath- 
erine Bloodgood, the contralto, will appear in a new reper- 
toire. Zara and Zara, quick-change artists, are new here. 
The hold-overs will be Yorke and Adams, Mr. A. O. Duncan, 
the ventriloquist, Mr. Lew Hawkins, Elita Proctor Otis, and 
the biograph. 

* • • 

Shakespeare's "As You Like It" will be given its final 
performance at the Alcazar this afternoon and to-morrow 
night. Monday night "Camille" will be put on, with Miss 
Roberts as Camille, and Mr. White Whittlesey as Armand. 
The following week "Drusa Wayne," Mr. Franklin Fyle's 
new play, will be presented. 

* * * 

"The Only Way" will go on at the Columbia next week, 
with Mr. Miller as Sydney Carton and Miss Anglin as Mimi, 
"Camille" is in preparation. 



f^V L _ San KrftnoliK-o'ii llreate.t Mimic Mall. 

VyrPrtCUm. O'Parrt.11 St.. between Stockton and Powell atreeli. 

Week commencing Sunday >fattncr. July 27. 

THE MAZETTI TROUPE: dratlan. White an.l <Y„ m „ny: Knlh- 
erlne Hloodgood: Zara nnd Zara: ELITA PROCTOR OTIH; Lew 
Hawkins: A. O. Dunoon: The Klogrnph nnd tn*t week of YORKE 
AND ADAMS. 

Matinees Wodneaday. Saturday, and Sunday. 

Reserved seats. 25c: Balcony lOe: opera chair* and box seats. 50o. 

A I Tk»-.i-« Bklasoo A Tham.. Managers. 

icazar l neatre. pnoni Aim^r. 

One Week Only. Beginning Monday, Evening Next — July 2 th. 

MISS FLORENCE ROBERTS 

Supported by White Whittlesey, and the famous Alcazar Stoofc Com- 
pany fn Dumas' celebrated emotional drama, 

GAMILLE 

Miss Roberts In the title rote, Mr- Whittlesey ai Armand. Only Mat- 
inee Saturday — Seats now selling. 

Prices— Even In era, 15o, 25c, 35c, 50c &. 75c. Matinees. 15c r 25c, 35c, 50c. 
Week Commencing Monday. August 4th— First presentation in this 
olty ol Franklin Fyles'new play, "Drusa Wayne." 



Columbia Theatre. 



Gottlob, Marx A f o 

Lessees ana Managers. 



Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. Charles Frohman presents 

HENRY MILLER MARGARET ANGLIN 

and a special company in the great success of many seasons, 

THE WILDERNESS 

by H. V. Esmond, author of '' When We Were Twenty-One." To be 
followed by — "The Onlv Way.'' Henry Miller as Sydney Carton. Mar- 
garet Anglin appearing for the first time in her original role of Mimi, 
In preparation — Camille." 



Fischer's Theatre 



As much in demand as ever. It tells the story. Already four "weeks. 
Because it is built to stay, and made to suit. Our sublime triple bill, 

POUSSE GAFE 

ANTONY AND GLEOPATRA AND A ROYAL FAMILY 
We always have plenty of good things. So we add new specialties, 
Smg, Dances, Novelties, Every Monday night duiing a "Record 
Breaking" run. 
No advanoe in prices, 

T> , I < S~\ L_J Mbs. Ernestine Kb.ei.ing, 

IVOll Upera flOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

Evenings at 8 sharp! Matinee Saturday at 2 sharpl 

To-night and Sunday night, last of TH E SERENADE. 
Monday, July 28th. The Grand Opera Season. 
Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 

AIDA 

Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday nights, and Saturday Matinee, 

LUGIA Dl LAMMERMOOR 

Same Popular prices— 25, 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



After the Theatre 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 
Dentist. 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 
extracting. 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines beers and Bupper. 

The Cafe ZInkand Is society's gathering place after 
the theatre Is over. 

Notice to Creditors. 

Estate of .TAMES HASTINGS, alao called JAMES J. HASTY. Deceased. 

No'ice !•» hereby given bv the undersigned, JOHN FAENTTAM. Admin- 
istrator of the Estate of JAMKS HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HASTY, 
Deceased, to the creditors of and all persons having claims against the 
said D«o a"ed, to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers, within four 
months after the first publication of this notice, to the said Administrator, 
at Room 79. Chronicle Building, the same bei"g his place for the transac- 
tion of the business of the said estate in the Citv and County of San Fran- 
cisoe, State of California. JOHN FARNHAM. 

Administrator of the Estate of 
JAMES HASTINGS, also called JAMES J. HASTY, Deceased 

Da ted at San Francisco, June 21, 1902. 
PIWRrFRANK McGOWAN 
"■"Attorney for Administrator 
"Rooms 75, 79 and 80 Chronicle Building. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 

■ The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year and the 
transaction of such other business as may be brought before the me«»ing 
will be held at the office of the company, No. 298 Sleuart Street. San Fran- 
iclsoo, on MONDAY, the 1th day of August, 19' 2, at 11 o'olock A, m, 

AUGUSTUS TAYLOR. Secretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 




The Automobile Club of California, 415 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Main 934. Officers: frTr. F. A. 
Hyde, President; Dr. F. J. Tillman, Vice-President; MY. A. 
C. Aiken, Secretary; Mr. Byron Jackson. Treasurer. 

* * * 

Automobile Club of San Jose. — Mr. E. T. Sterling, Presi- 
dent; Mr. B. D. Merchant, Secretary; General Executive 
Committee: Messrs. Frank Coykendall, Harry Bercovich, 
Charles Chrisman, E. T. Sterling, and B. D. Merchant. 

* » • 

Touring Committee. — Mr. E. P. Brinegar, chairman; Mr. 
H. Courtney Ford, and Mr. George H. Whitney. 




Mr. F. A. Hyde, president Automobile Club of California. 

* • * 

It is predicted that in a short time all the leading bicycle 
manufacturers will be building motor cycles, and that be- 
fore long the present styles of bicycles will be as obsolete 
as the old "ordinary." 

* • • 

News items, personal mention, and paragraphs relating 
to autoneers, motor cars, or the development of the trade 
generally, will be accepted for publication in this depart- 
ment. 

* • * 

A story comes from Denver about a man, a maid and an 
auto car. It seems that the hold man sprang into a motor 



We quote the following from the Cycle and Automo- 
bile Trade Journal for June 1st, 1902, page 24: 

"THE 'WHITE' STEAM MACHINE" 

]'The unbroken record of the "White* steam vehicles scoring- 100 per 
(i cent. in every endurance run in which they have entered, is of itself 
ti the highest possible recommendation, and the added laurels they 
t have won as a result of the fuel and water consumption records 
ti made in the last two runs, and Hie strictly non-stop runs made. 
t( p1ace these vehicles in a class by themselves. There is little wonder 
that these vehicles are the talk of the trade." 

White Sewing Machine Co. 

300 POST STREIT, San Francisco, C«l. 

C. A. HAWKINS, GENERAL AGENT. 



carriage occupied by the maid, seized the steering bar, as- 
sumed control of the machine and maid, became captain 
of the ship, as it were (a sort of automobile piracy), and 
in three minutes and 'steen seconds had secured the con- 
sent of his prisoner to allow him to steer her auto through 
life. 

Such stories are exhilarating, and show that Denver is 
up and doing. But such acts of piracy will endanger the san- 



»» "Xocomobile" ^ZZi 

J622-J628 MA.RKET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Take pleasure in an- 
nouncing that they 
are now handling- 



GASOLINE 
AUTOMOBILES 

and represent the following well-known manufacturers: 

Wlnton Motor Carriage Company. Cleveland, Ohio: United Slates Long- 
Distance Automobile Company, New York. N. Y.; Buffalo Automobile and 
Auto-Bl. Company, Buffalo, N. Y.; Smith A Mabley, American Agents 
"Panhard— The Peuget." 

Full ami Complete Line of Parts and Accessories, Automobile heather 
Clothing for Ladies and Qentlemen, Lamps, French Morns, etc. 



"LOCOMOBILES" FOR RENT 



Telephone South 697 



OLDSMOBILB 




RETAIL WAREROOMS: 

Western Automobile Co. 
201-203 Larkln St.. San Francisco 



GASOLINE 
AITOMOBILE 

Climbs 20 per 

cent, grades 
naxlmum Speed 
20 miles 

Orders taken now for 
August Delivery 

PRICE $750, 

F. 0. B. SAN FRANCISCO 
PACIFIC COAST agents: 

The Manufacturers' Co. 
26 Fremont St., San Francisco 







Pierce 






Motorette 




V " ' ^^"*fc. 


GASOLINE 
AUTOMOBILE 




_\^4rrj 


ft? 73 McAllister St. 


■§«' i 1 - 




HW SAN FRANCISCO 




r /^^jB 


Sfcil Malcolm C. 


| 


. 


^aaf/ Whyte 
Co. 

s> /fgente 



July 28. 1902. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



(ho rrmrmfnituriTs. Already then is trouble in filling 
i, ami If .very maid should Importnna pa to bi 
a "bubble," liKislatlon would l» to preserve the 

• • • 

Following Is a partial list of prominent automoblli- 

illfornla: 
Los 11. C. Turnir. II. Allen, Carl A.Iain. .1. I". 

bradhury. Gail Borden, Wni. Bailey, li. W. Brookings, Helen 

illlna, a T Croaaley, W. s. Hook. P. N. Hawes, C. n. 
Howland, 0. W. Hart. K. A. Doran. \V. P. Dunham, \V. !i. 
Wise. F. O. Johnson, Dr. Martlndale, E. T. Off, Dr. H. M. 
Pomeroy. Harry Robinson, R. H. Reid. C. H. Sessions, Dr. 
A. F. Schiffman. L\ W. Davles. 

San Diego— Mr. J. A. Kuert. 

Riverside — Messrs. H. A. Bain. Martin A. Chase. 

Fasadena — Messrs. Ted Ford. Ray G. Coates. A. C. Her- 
rick. Dr. T. S. I'pdegraff. 

Redlauds — Mr. A. C. Denman. Jr., Dr. C. A. Sanborn. 

Duarte — Mr. G. P. Fitzgerald. 

Whittle! — Dr. Levi Johnson. 

Ethanae — Mr. Frank T. Hollenbeck. 

Tucson — Mr. Francis M. Hartman. 

Long Beach — Mr. H. H. Hamilton. 

• • • 

It is now almost a certainty, says an exchange, that an au- 
tomobile line, running from Placerville to Lake Tahoe, a 
distance of sixty-five miles, will be established in the near 
future. The lake terminus of the system will be Tallac. A 
company has been started in Placerville to float the new 
venture, and the necessary arrangements are now being 
made. The old Placerville road, along which the new au- 
tomobile line will run, is one of the finest roads in Califor- 
nia, and is noted both for its unsurpassed scenery and its 
early history- It follows the entire length of the American 
River, passes many mountain lakes, crosses the summit of 
the Sierra Nevadas, and winds down along the Little 
Truckee River to Lake Tahoe. 



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ceilings, with which the carpets and upholstery match per- 
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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 



L/OokerUn 




Mr. John Mackay always complained that while he liked 
to help men he felt his greatest difficulty in aiding them 
without injuring them. He paid for the publication of many 
an author's book. Once he went quietly into the Call office 
and asked to see the editor. The reporter in charge was 
very gruff, and said: "Well, you can't see him. He is very 
busy." 

"Very well," answered the millionaire with his usual un- 
ruffled calm. "Say to him that Mr. Mackay called." This 
was one illustration of his good temper. 

Mrs. Mackay and he lived apart for many years, for she 
refused to live in America. She did cot get on well in so- 
ciety here and in New York, and so she was among the 
first of the Americans to go abroad and make a career for 
herself. She has the best position of anyone abroad, and 
the Californians and New Yorkers who snubbed her would 
now be very glad to know her. Mrs. Mackay has always 
been a very great friend of Mrs. de Young and has 
been of much assistance to her. Mr. Mackay was of the 
most generous and loyal husbands. He would never allow 
anyone to say anything against her choice of living abroad. 

Mr. D. O. Mills eulogized Mr. Mackay in the newspapers, 
but they often had friendly squabbles. Mr. Mills liked a 
quiet banter with Mr. Mackay, and was almost always 
making sarcastic references to him. Once in New 
York Mr. Mills was called upon to make a speech introduc- 
ing Mr. Mackay, and he said satirically: "I want to intro- 
duce the greatest financier of the West, if not of the age." 

It angered Mr. Mackay, and he arose and said, extempor- 
aneously: 

"Mr. Mills has just drawn you a picture of himself. I pre- 
tend to be none of these things Mr. Mills has ascribed to me, 
but he is all of them and more. On a very hot day in New 
York the ice melts, but when you meet Mr. Mills he is the 
only really cool thing in town. However, if I am not as 
great as Mr. Mills, I will have a larger funeral." 

• * * 

Mr. Charlie Shortridge, the former proprietor of the Call, 
is the personification of tne spirit of Thomas Jefferson, for 
he believes that all men are free and equal in all senses. 
For years Mr. Shortridge has had a negro valet, and since 
he retired to the peace of San Jose the valet accompanied 
him. Mr. Suortridge insists upon his valet eating at the 
same table with him and calling him "Charlie." 

• • • 

When Mr. Frank H. Ames reaches Dawson City with his 
bride of last week, he will have a nice little surprise for 
his acquaintances up there. Not so long ago the Dawsonites 
expected to see another Mrs. Frank Ames. For years Mr. 
Ames was reputed the fiance of Lorena ("Birdie") Barbier. 
a beauty with unconventional ideas and the heiress of her 
sister, the late Mrs. Henri F. Emeric. It was thought that 
Mrs. Ames mire was opposed to her son's marrying Miss 
Barbier. and as the young man holds a position in his 
father's company, without suffering a set-back in his busi- 
ness career, he could not marry minus his parents' consent. 
But at one time the marriage was imminent. That was 
when Mr. Ames was managing his father's business inter- 
ests in Dawson. He made every preparation to receive a 
bride. Miss Barbier, with her companion. M'iss Plunkett, 
made the journey to Dawson in the winter, over the ice. 
She carried an elaborate trousseau. However, the pro- 
gramme was not pulled off as arranged for some unexplained 
reason. As it was then the shut-in season, the disappointed 



bride had to stay in Dawson, willy-nilly, until spring's ar- 
rival made traveling possible. She then returned with 
her companion to San Francisco. Mr. Ames was also of the 
party, which came in sledges over tne ice. Shortly after 
Miss Barbier went East with her father. No reason has ever 
been given for the final rnpture with her fiance, therefore 
the surprise engendered at his marriage with Miss Freda 
Ohlandt. 

• * * 

Judge Ward McAllister and Mr. Frank Johnson have the 
agency for a popular champagne. Recently at the riotel 
Rafeal they were drinking some of their own beverage, when 
Mr. Johnson conceived the idea of substituting ginger ale 
for Judge McAllister's champagne, to see if the agent would 
know the difference. So during a temporary absence of the 
Judge, a waiter replaced the champagne with ginger ale. 
Judge McAllister's return was eagerly awaited. He took 
up his glass, made a profound salutation, said: "Ladies and 
gentlemen, your health!" He swallowed the entire glass 
of ginger ale, and soliloquized, "Oh, there is no champagne 
like that in the world." It was not until a real glass of his 
own wine was placed on the table by him that he realized 
a trick had been played upon him. He tasted the cham- 
pagne, and said, "It's ginger ale!" 

Then he would drink neither. The Judge has been ven- 
erated in his club for years as a connoisseur of wine and 
food, but now his reputation is tottering. 

• * * 

Although it is now nearly a month since the Coronation 
honors were announced, it is still news in this western out- 
post of civilization that Dr. A. Conan Doyle, the well-known 
author and novelist, is now Sir A. Conan Doyle, Kt. H. I. M. 
Edward VII, in recognition of his ability and standing in 
the literary world, has been pleased to confer upon him the 
order of Knighthood. It is fashionable here to comment 
upon the slow manner of news-gathering abroad, but honors 
in this respect might be pretty even if a close count was 
kept of the record on both sides. 
■ • • 

Professor Edward Howard Griggs, formerly of Stanford, 
"the perfect man," still continues to be the wonder and the 
sensation of Boston, where his ethical lectures are draw- 
ing cultured mobs from all over the country-side. I am told 
that people come in wagons, bicycles, and automobiles — 
make pilgrimages to his rostrum. I was noticing an article 
of his which appeared in the Overland Monthly a few years 
ago. It was a good article, and the reading of it recalls 
to me a story. Shortly before Professor Griggs left Stan- 
ford for his Eastern tour, he was the guest of honor at 




RESOLVED 

SbtfalemW&deis the most 
refreshing and satisfyingdrinK 
on earth! 



July 26. 19C2. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



16 



a dining club here. The club Is a cultured affair, and th< 
reading of a paper la a regular i 

dinners. I nns to read Ihi paper on thla 

occasion, and some o( thi got wind of thi 

that the Professor Intended lo read I is paper which ap| 
In the Overland Monthly. A copy of the magatin 
accordingly bought, and submitted to a printer. A presa 
proof of the essay was given to each member of thi- . lub, 
When Professor Griggs' turn tame he arose with much 
empressement, produced his manuscript, an i began. Alien 
he read the first sentence he was surprised to note that his 
words were being delivered in unison by every person at the 
table. He looked up, and when ne saw his hosts holding 
"proof" on him the proof was sufficient and he sat down. 

• • * 

Talk about a "tempest in a teapot!" Alameda, the peace- 
ful little City of Homes, has just escaped the perils of one, 
and its Inhabitants breathe easier now that the storm has 
passed. A woman as usual was the inciting cause of the 
mild disturbance in the otherwise placid atmospheric con- 
ditions. When will it be otherwise? A wrathful husband, 
his jealousy aroused at the flattering comment dinned in 
his ears about a good-looking employee of the railroad, 
reports the man at headquarters as a flirt, equivalent to a 
criminal charge across the bay, and punishment follows 
dire and fast. The culprit is banished to another sphere 
of usefulness at reduced pay, only to be re-instated promptly 
upon the representations of others to the effect that the 
only charge which could possibly be laid against the man was 
gentlemanly courtesy to the company's patrons, irrespective 
of age or sex, and that he personally could not be held 
responsible for face or figure. From all I can learn tha 
action of the company in restoring the man to his former 
position gives entire satisfaction to the traveling public 
with whom their employee is a general favorite, and who 
believe in fair play. 

• * • 

Signor Dominico Russo, the little tenor who is such a 
favorite with Tivoli audiences, is not only a singer but 
a humorist and a practical joker. He carries his fun-loving 
propensities onto the stage, and the effect sometimes is 
to just about break up the chorus. 

In one of the operas last year he had an impassioned 
song to sing to the heroine, and his original rendering of 
it is still the talk of the Tivoli singers. It was to be 
sung in Italian, of course, but Signor Russo thought he would 
try it in English with words of his own improvisation. So at 
the proper moment he dashed onto the stage with the 
romantic swing and swagger that characterize him, and 
in tempestuous manner he sang: 

"I just had a turkey dinner, 

I just had a turkey dinner, 

I just had a turkey dinner. 
O Lord, how hungry I was." 
His somewhat imperfect English and his artistic slurring 
of the words deceived the audience, but the other singers 
nearly had convulsions. So did Signor Russo after he left 
the stage, and he always looks upon it as his best practical 
joke. 



The decorating and paper-hanging done by the George 
W. Clark Co. has long been a subject of complimentary 
comment. Now Mr. F. B. Veirs has taken up the work of the 
firm and will carry it forward. During the thirty-seven 
years he has been with the Clark Co. he has made thou- 
sands of friends, who did not even know who he was, but 
now he is going to work under his own name, and can be 
recommended as entirely satisfactory. The old friends of 
the firm can rely on having the work done as well as when 
Clark & Co. were in existence. Mr'. Veirs, who is at Pest 
and Stockton streets, will fill all orders. 



The Theft of the Diamond Fleece 

By Gaston Lavierre. 
.May sils alone in her bedroom, 

Weary, profane and forlorn. 
Love flown tin 

Diamond fleece nicely shorn. 

Diamond swallow and rabbit. 

Sapphire tarantula, too. 
Emerald bat, amethyst cat. — 

All of her jewelry zoo. 

Flittered and gone in a moment, 

Putnam B. took 'em along — 
Doctor, come dope hopeless May Hope, 

Dupe of the weak Captain Strong. 

Long has she wantoned with Cupid, 
Long has she trifled with men. — 

More than was need -Maysie, indeed. 
Never will trifle again. 

Nickel-plate lords have adored her, 

Addle-pate barons galore, 
Johnnies and cads, heirs and their dads, 

Kings, Jacks and Aces galore. 

How has she tricked them and played them. 
Snared them with passion and vice, 

Now she has known how she has sown — 
Really, isn't it nice? 

E'en on the face of an actress 

Time keeps his troublous score, 
Age has begun — better play nun; 

You'll play the devil no more. 

M'ay sits alone in her bedroom. 

Weary, forsaken, and sad, 
Sans gem or song, sans Hope or Strong, 

Sans everything — but the ad. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 




1 



/Year the Cricrt'.tfhat the devil art thou 
'One that will pt&y the devil , .sir, wtfhyou ' 




own i^rier 



Hail to Gompers! Hail to Gompers! 

Unions lift united cry. 
Union bands raise union music 

To the union vaulted sky. 

Union suits are marching, marching. 

Union banners fan the breeze. 
Ain't the unions all united? 

I should rather (union) sneeze! 

Gompers, Gompers, union Gompers, 

Sing your little union lay, 
For that song is your profession. 

And you've made your singing pay. 

Formerly "n-e-r-v-e" spelled "nerve" — now it spells "P. 
H. McCarthy, President of the Building Trades Council, 
also Civil Service Commissioner." Never has anything come 
under my notice so monumentally cheeky as his action 
Saturday in putting men at work on the Murphy building. 
Members of the Building Trades Council who were working 
on the building objected to the presence of Brotherhood 
carpenters, who are not recognized as true union men. 
So the contractor discharged the Brotherhood men tem- 
porarily and suspended carpenter work for the time being. 
When he arrived at the scene of work Saturday morning he 
found a fresh crew of carpenters on the building. Inquiry 
developed the fact that they were members of the Trades 
Council, and that McCarthy, who was present, said that he 
had hired the men and put them to work. When the con- 
tractor objected, McCarthy became abusive. I am not in 
favor of violence, as a rule, but I am sorry that this impu- 
dent agitator's head was not punched. Though unions may 
be necessary evils, McCarthy is an evil that can be dispensed 
with. 

The Examiner should send some of its "bright young men" 
to London, where such sights as were witnessed by Police 
Captain Schmitterburger of New York might convince them 
that San Francisco is not so badly policed after all. The dis- 
patches state that the American officer was fairly staggered 
at the hundreds of drunken people whom he saw in the 
slums, and pronounced IMew York's worst quarters- heavenly 
compared with them. "He stood in the heart of London's 
night life," the account says, "and a reporter pointed out 
its arteries. Piccadilly, Regent street, Shaftsbury avenue 
and Coventry street, were full of drunken women as far 
as the eye could see." The truth is that San Francisco is 
well policed and well behaved. But the Examiner is against 
Chief Wittman, as it would be against any chief except its 
own pet, Esola. The damage it does the town by its li- 
belous attacks on the police department worry it but little. 
A gratification of its spite is the principal object in view. 

"I believe the water cure as practiced by the American 
army in the Philippines to be the most humane method of 
obtaining information from criminals of war that is known 
to modern warfare." says Colonel Groesbeck. I can't quite 
agree with the Colonel. Did he every try slow immersion 
in boiling oil, or the gradual slicing away of small portions 
of the body? I am surprised that our officers have never 
thought of these methods. That they have not thougnt of 
them is evidenced by the fact that they have not used them. 



I say unto you, O City Fathers, that the method of ob- 
viating plague and cholera is not to keep the mention of 
them out of the papers, but to go forth with the fear of 
God in your hearts and a scrubbing brush in your hands. 
Germs do not care anything about the daily papers. They 
are not sensitive to comment. Give them a heap of garbage 
or an open sewer, and they shall inherit the earth. What 
our city needs is eternal vigilance and unceasing disinfec- 
tion. Out in the Richmond district and North Beach there 
are garbage collectors committing felonies every day. The 
air reeks with unrighteousness, the breezes are sickly 
with decay. I beg you, good Fathers, make some arrests be- 
fore it is necessary to declare a quarantine which nobody 
will be supposed to say anything about. 

A bull-fight, however you take it, is a barbarous thing 
If the show is carried off with true Castilian eclat, it is 
cruelty to animals. If it is conducted with tame bulls, 
tame toreadors and papier mache spears, it is cruelty to 
audiences. That's a plain statement of why we can't, won't 
and don't intend to have a bull-fight in the town of Rich- 
mond, i don't need an Examiner symposium of prominent 
pulpit megaphones, illustrated by photographs, to convince 
me of what a bull-fight would mean in California. They 
have bull-flghts in Texas — also nigger burnings. We want 
neither here. George C. Johnson, the promoter of the Rich- 
mond affair, is either a faker or an intentional law breaker. 
He should be given a ticket to Kansas. 

What a shame! Just because J. B. Hunt, an ironworker, 
cracked the wrong man over the head with a billiard cue, 
he was arrested and is likely to go to jail. J. B.'s purpose 
was laudable. He had been insulted by a Fifth street saloon 
keeper, and all he was looking for was revenge. He just 
happened to get into the wrong saloon and cracked the 
wrong man. He was willing to repair his mistake by tak- 
ing in all the saloons along the line and rapping various 
barkeepers with billiard cues, but the police stepped in 
and interfered. Nice town, this is, where a man can't 
be revenged for an insult. The police should be suppressed, 
and this is plainly a case for the Examiner. 

The principals and assistants at the Oelrichs-Martin wed- 
ding are no more relieved than I, now that it is all over. 
Of course I was just too interested for anything to know 
that the bride got seventeen (17) wagonloads of presents, 
that her gown cost $10,000, and that the groom wore patent 
leather shoes made in Paris. (In the latter instance I was 
disappointed not to get the exact list price.) But there 
were times when I yawned. The bride was so coy and the 
press agents made so deuced much of every delay. I am 
glad that the affair was pulled off without a hitch. Even 
Newport marriages for love sometimes pall. 

Ho to the tune of the Spanish doubloon and the bushels to 
boot of piratical loot! Like the General Sherman the little 
ship Herman is hitting the breeze for mysterious seas, 
there to hunt for a treasure of wealth beyond measure, 
concealed by some Jappies (the shrewd little chappies). 
Not like searchers of old go these seekers for gold, but as 
all have surmised, they are capitalized by a well-laden box 
of capital stocks, the whole made official by knowledge judi- 
cial. So ho for the West and this perilous quest — we all 
know the rest. 

Baron Von Meder is up against it. Baron Von Meder is 
no baron, as you probably guessed upon hearing the title. 
Baron Von Meder assumed his patent of nobility because 
ha needed the money. He got it. But one fine morning 
his title and his credit ran out together. Now he is bar- 
ren of title, barren of friends, barren of credit, barren Von 
Meder. 

And the lesson of Tracey teaches us that some men are 
braver than others, and that others are less so. 



July 26. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



The Dispensation 



By John Fleming Wilson. 
The riotous nortnwester strummed OTOThend niul ihe 
I at the foot of the cliff in Impotent lonKliiK. IIikIi 
and supremo, the soft, shining Armament looked down If 
a mother looks down upon the uncovered fan- of her new- 
born child. Her eyes upon the sky littered with stars and 
listening— as one catches at an elusive strain of to 
to the tumultuous appeal of the waves beneath, there stood 
on the stark up-throw of the headland a woman. 'I no 
witchery of the night enthralled her. and in the deli, ions 
solitude she poised herself against the gale with throat 
bared to its caress. A star rolled and flashed down to 
the dim sea-line; her eyes pursued it until the gleam per- 
ished into the darkness at the edge of the world ; and when 
she looked up again she marveled that the starry vault 
should glitter in unscathed brilliance. The star had fallen; 
the night was undarkened. Stifling a sob the woman bent 
gently over and viewed the surf down below. 

A sea swept in from the main and threw itself panting 
against the shore. An instant's flurry, a jet of spray and the 
repulsed wave streamed back. She traced its foamy line 
as it leaped out into the open until it, too, was beyond 
her vision. Then the stunted fern received her as she 
sank into it, and her tears fell upon the earth, softening 
to the touch of spring. 

Twenty years before Constance Thomas had climbed to 
this spot, and flushing to the caress of the seasonal wind, 
knelt there to trace in the thin mould a cross. Stretching 
herself in the agony of her grief upon that erossimade with 
her own hand, she had sworn that she would live a maiden 
in the sight of God and man until the end of life should bring 
her face to face with her dear lover, sepulchred somewhere 
in this farthest sea. 

For ten years the memory of him whom she loved bore 
her up; the latter ten the consciousness of an irrevocable 
vow had given her the exaltation of an eminent religion. 
But no*? 

Her hands swept out, and while she lay in the form of a 
cross she stiffened her lips into thei mould of a pra'yer. Ivo 
words came to utter her heart of hearts, and presently she 
flung herself on her side. "When she could see clearly, the 
gentle motherhood of the brooding sky gave her the words 
she lacked. She saw again that the admirable heavens 
shone less resplendent because of the fallen star, and she 
heard continuous waves upon the margin of the sea. Drop- 
ping a forearm over her eyes, she whispered: "Thou 
knowest, O God, that I am — a woman!" Then she quivered, 
awaiting the lash. 

The moments passed as slow clouds before the moon's 
face. There was a heavy step by her side, and she rose 
swiftly. A man stood where she had stood on the outer 
point. Without surprise, and thankful for the dusk that 
hid her face, she waited for him to speak. When he began 
she brushed her hair out of her eyes and listened intently: 

"Constance," he said slowly, "I'm telling you the same 
old story. For years you have reproved me for thinking of 
it. Two years ago you spoke harshly. This is the last time, 
for now I am going away for good." 

He paused, and she glanced at his stalwart figure limned 
against the sky. Without looking she knew that the high 
head was streaked with gray. "We are getting old," she 
murmured. 

He made a vague gesture of dissent. "We haven't com- 
menced to live yet," he answered, "and, Constance, I tell 
you bluntly you are making a mistake in letting him spoil 
your life. My God! Constance, do you realize that you've 
given twenty years to a dead man? ivTust he have all?" 
No response came, and the man watched her. She had 
spoken of growing old. Yet age seemed utterly apart from 
her; years could not describe her. She was neither young 



nor old: the lines of her fl^m r face 

told no story: she was simply of the present, mature 

be whispered. "Come to me!" 

She bent, down unci plucked up a bit of fern, shakii; 
dirt from Its roots, as she Straightened bet otl have 

waited n good many years." she said presently. 
■Must I wait all my life?" 

She stepped swiftly forward, sharply drawing her breath. 
"Would you wait all -all your II 

He glanced at her tense face, and then threw back his 
head. "1 would," he said soberly. 

The fern fell in fragments at her feet. "Ton have been 
faithful." she said appealingly, "but I am — not — faithful." 
The words escaped sobbingly and he came nearer. "What 
do you mean?" he ventured reassuringly. "You have been 
faithful to one dead twenty years. And I — don't you think 
it possible for a man to love that way?" 

Her gaze fixed upon the dim outline of the cross crushed 
into the fern by her body. When she raised her eyes there 
was no fire in them. "We must say no more about it," she 
said dully. "It's not to be thought of, Hal." 

The long-unfamiliar name roused him, and he spoke 
strongly, but at first as one who repeats a thing too often 
retold. 

She listened impassively until, with a swift movement, he 
was beside her. The new tone in his voice dominated her* 
spirit. "You are a woman. Conny, not a marble headstone. 
You're throwing away womanhood. You'll die the same girl 
that was left loverless twenty years ago. You know I love 
you, and I know that you love me. Come!" 

She did not see him, for again with a plaintive longing 
she had raised her face to the sky, and her heart was pour- 
ing into the words which the man could not hear. "Thou 
knowest, O God, that I am a woman and would be — as other 
women." Then she sobbed for forgiveness. 

There was no answer, and the cross burned before her 
eyes. 

The silence was harshly broken. "Do you still love him?" 

The strain broke the bonds that had fettered her. "I 
hate him!" she cried. 

The rioting wind entered their world once more, and from 
the cliff-foot came the rush of breakers. Wrapped by the 
throbbing gale the woman bent forward toward the man. 
'jl swore on the cross that I would be his till death. I — I 
did not know." 

"Are you sorry for the oath? Is that what has kept us 
apart?" he demanded. 

"For ten year — yes!" 

His attitude flung a challenge before her. 

"I have prayed God to forgive me if I " She ceased, 

and the man, groped darkly for her meaning. "If what?" 
he asked in a whisper. 

"If I broke my vow," she answered, and smiled as a flower 
opens under the sunlight. 

"And has God forgiven you?" he jested as his arms went 
out to her. 

The rising moon flooded the headland with light. Con- 
stance Thomas forced her eyes to the spot of her crucifix- 
ion defiantly. But there was nothing of shape or form, 
simply the ferns brushed by the wind. "Yes," she whispered 
in contentment and turned her eyes gladly upon his face. 



Tt 

Moore" 


has been 
Is better 


said 
than 


that "all whisky is good." But 
others. Found at all first-class 


"Jesse 
places. 




C. 


H. 


REHNSTROM 








(Successor to Sanders At Johnson.) 










TAILOR 




Phetan Bldg.Tcl. Nia 


n 5387 San Franciscc 


.Gal. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 




The financial condition of this 
Oceanic Steamship company and the causes ot the 
Company. present assessment have been so 

thoroughly distorted in the desire 
to show the management up in as bad a light as possible, 
it is time that the true statement ot its affairs was given 
the public. The difficulty the management has to face is 
in giving out the correct figures, owing to the misconstruc- 
tion apt to be placed upon the relative details which would 
require a lengthy and specific explanation. As a matter of 
fact, the present indebtedness was contracted by the ad- 
vancement of moneys by the firm of J. D. Spreckels Bros. 
for the betterments of the service. Had these advances 
not been made the money required would have necessarily 
been obtained by assessment from the shareholders. In or- 
der to obviate this draft upon the shareholders the manage- 
ment, through the kindness of the Messrs. Spreckels, were 
enabled to add the new vessels required by the service in 
the hope that the increased earnings would long ere tnis 
have been sufficient to recoup the sums advanced. That 
this did not follow cannot rightfully be attributed to the 
management, and there is nothing laid to their charge which 
shows that they have neglected in any way to further at 
all times the best interests of the company for the benetu 
of the shareholders. Competition in the lines of trade has 
in a measure reduced the earnings of the corporation, and 
while the passenger business has been on the whole satis- 
factory, business conditions in the Australian colonies have 
not been such as to benefit the shipping industry. There 
is no justification for the statement volunteered that the 
mail subsidy granted by the New Zealand Government to 
the Oceanic Company will be withdrawn, and this is only 
a fair sample of the length the enemies of the management 
will go to vent their personal spite. It is also denied that 
a rival company has any intention of entering into com- 
petition with the Oceanic, for its mail subsidies, or that 
it will put on a line of steamers to cut down the time made 
by the vessels now on the run. There is nothing particularly 
desperate about this company's financial affairs. That it is 
in debt cannot be denied, but that this indebtedness was 
contracted in any other but the ordinary course of business 
and in the best interests of the corporation is something 
which only our hostile and biased critic would affirm. None 
of the leading stockholders are disturbed by the recent de- 
cline in the price of the shares, while they are disposed 
to treat the inimical criticisms on the management of the 
company with the contempt they deserve. The corporation 
is well equipped for its ocean service, and the seven steam- 
ers flying its flag on the Australian and Island trade are as 
good in their class as any in the other leading steamship 
lines of the world. In its effort to withstand competition, 
the management should certainly have the support and con- 
fidence of their shareholders, for without it, face to face 
with vindictive and irresponsible foes on the outside with 
nothing to lose by the depreciation in stock values, the diffi- 
culties of the situation are immeasurably increased. 

The brighter side of the proposition reveals the possi- 
bility of eventually disposing of present indebtedness and 
the restoration of the Company's affairs on a profitable basis. 
Trade with the islands and the colonies is developing yearly 
with every assurance of a vast increase in the future before 
any decline can be expected. 

The Oceanic Company is in control of the situation, and 
its position thereby is strengthened against any possible 
rivalry for years to come. It must reap the benefits of 



the growing trade and benefit financially thereby, so that 
its condidon at present can only be regarded as temporary, 
and coincident to a natural expansion of the company's 
affairs, 'this is only the second assessment the shareholders 
have been asked to pay. They have already received 
$250,000 in dividends. It would perhaps have been wiser upon 
tne part of the management never to have paid this money, 
which would have helped to have built up a reserve fund 
to tide them over a crisis like the present. The best plan 
now would be to simp,y go ahead and straighten out the 
affairs of the company by assessing right straight along uniil 
every dollar of the outstanding indebtedness is cleared off. 
This may not suit the critics of the management on the 
outside, but as they are not personally interested in the 
affairs of the corporation their complaints can only oe 
considered as for effect. The legitimate holders of stock 
will naturally be in sympathy with a policy of the kind, and 
they alone are worthy of consideration. In view of the mis- 
construction placed upon the financial statements of the 
corporation, and the way in which facts are distorted in a 
manner as unfavorable as possible to the management, 
its action in withholding information for indiscriminate 
circulation meets with the full and hearty approval of all 
directly interested in the welfare of the company, and it 
is hoped that this course will be continued in the future. 
The inside affairs of a corporation should be available to 
its shareholders alone and beyond the reach of those who 
are disposed to wreck its welfare. 

The health food craze is knocking the 

For Fools and first-class flouring trade in a manner 

Cranks on Health, scarcely credible in the Northwest 

States. The farmers find it more 
profitable to add a little molasses to their grain, give the 
compound a fancy name, and then throw their weight into 
advertising. It is easy this way to make a fortune, where 
formerly there was scarcely a decent living in selling to the 
mills. An effort has been made by the trade papers to stamp 
out the rising industry, with ridicule, but so far with but 
little effect. In this line of poncy the Northwestern Miller 
says: The credulity of the American people is so great 
and the selling power of printing ink is so enormous that 
the schemers of Battle Creek think there is no limit to what 
can be accomplished by playing the combination. At last 
accounts there were over twenty of these health concerns 
in Battle Creek, representing an alleged investment exceed- 
ing $20,000,000. There are still a few good honest millers 
making fine first class flour in Battle Creek, who should not 
be confused with the fakers. They are just struggling along 
making the ordinary milling profit, whereas if they wouid 
descend to the use of cheap molasses as a mixture and label 
their product "Chewachunka," or something equally nau- 
seating, they, too, could find unlimited demand for their 
output and make a fortune in a week or two. Some names 
chosen to sell this food shows the rating of idiocy in which 
the purchasers are placed by the fakers who labor under 
the style of inventor: "Tryabita," "Malta Vita," "Flak-ota," 
"Malt-Too," "My Food," "Per-Foo," "Cero-Fruti," "Korn- 
Krisp," "Neulrita," and "Eata-Malta." An English financial 
exchange, in discussing this trade abomination, sneeringly 



The Favorite Champagne 

Moet&Gtyaiidoft 

"WHITE SEAL." 

Dry,Deucate, Del/c/ous. 

The gain in importations of Moet it Chan don Champagne during 190 
equal to more than 100 per cent of the combined increase "f ail other Champagne 
Houses.— "Bonfort'a Wim <fi Spirit Circular.!' 



July 26. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



ta such treatment of a promising Indwtrjr, and IU| 
rmatloo of n trust to control the entire pr. 
nam., | th.> Amalgamated Association ol Po 
tal two billions." It would organize tor the purpose "f tnnmi- 
facturiog in one large asylum under direction of a co 
tent physician and staff of able-bodied keepers, all U 
ablts. Grabajawful. and Katahunka that its Inmates can in- 
vent, cook up and ship. Now that the Held has been pretty 
well covered In corn, wheat and barley, some smooth article 
has tackled rice as a last resort, determined to keep in the 
swim. There are still a few suggestions which could be 
made to those who cater to the whims of credulous dyspep- 
tics and hypochrondlacs generally, before falling back on 
the manufacture of patented Safety Dog Biscuits, etc. 

There is nothing ne.w in the 
The Local Stock Market, market for stocks and bonds. 

The latter are, as usual, in 
good demand and with light offerings, but elsewhere the 
movement is quiet, with prices unchanged. The gas and 
lighting people are still struggling with one another for su- 
premacy, one cut in price being met by another, until people 
are beginning to inquire whether the gas which they have 
been charged so much for until competition began is about 
the cheapest product in the line of manufactures. In lieu 
of the usual monthly statement the gossips of the street. 
invariably people who never owned a share, are shaping the 
affairs of the Oceanic to suit their own ideas. When finan- 
cial authorities argue that the company must incorporate 
in order to pay their indebtedness for the reason that it is 
in excess of capital paid in, it suggests an ignorance which 
accounts in a measure for the extraordinary views they 
take upon other topics of the day. It is unkind to upset 
the home-made plans for a $30,000,000 combination of local 
canneries, but it has been done in a ruthless manner, so 
local genius, so well posted on a matter which never ex- 
isted outside of a vivid imagination, had better try again. 
Better luck next time the guessing begins. Maybe. The 
usual monthly dividends nave been declared up to date, 
with unfailing regularity. 

Business with the Comstock brokers on 
Pine-St. Market. Pine street is at a standstill. Even the 
death of John W. Mackay did not create 
a ripple of excitement. A few years ago an announcement 
of the kind would have turned the street upside down for 
a short time. Few changes are reported at the mines. 
Ophir is now shipping a high-grade ore which brings in good 
returns to the company's treasury. The usual shipments are 
also continued from Con.-Cal.-Virginia, and Silver Hill also 
is making a record as a bullion producer. Outside of this 
there is little doing, which accounts in some degree for dull 
times in the market. 

Pine sheet lost an old and well 
known habitue by the death of 
John T. Bradley last week. The 

deceased, who was born in Ohio 
sixty-eight years ago, was one of the heaviest traders in the 
market during the bonanza period, outside of the bonanza 
firm, and his transactions amounted at times to many hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars daily. He was a mining engi- 
neer by profession, and until his death was constantly in 
request by capitalists with whom he stood in high favor. 
He was a man of genial disposition, and liberal, no tale 
of distress being ever passed unheeded if it took the last 
dollar he had in his pocket. As an expert he was widely 
known all over the West, and during his long career on the 
Coast, his name was associated in mining transactions with 
all the leading men in the business, also in connection with 
the early development work on the Comstock. He was popu- 
lar with all who knew him, and his loss will he sincerely 
regretted by a large circle of friends all over the continent. 
~^^Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 
Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 



A Well-Known Miner 
Crosses the Big Divide. 



We arc In receipt of a prospectus of the White Flock 
r Minim: Company of Ellsworth, Maine, Inoorpo 

naive property located In Mariposa county, 
east ol l.e Grande. As the company has had the good Judu- 

it Thomas Price of Thomas 
Price & Son, who Is one of the very few men out here who 
know anything about copper mines, the property must be all 
right, or it would never have come out on his report. The 
men at the head of the enterprise are prominent in pro- 
nal and banking circles in Maine. They represent a 
heavy financial backing, enough to operate largely In any- 
thing they may undertake, which speaks well for the future 
of their California acquisition. 



The financial statement of the Sierra Railway Company of 
California for the quarter ended March 31, 1902. which ap- 
pears in this issue of the News Letter, makes a remarkably 
good showing in the traffic accounts, both passenger and 
freight. For the quarter the earnings in excess of expendi- 
tures amounted to $31,923.15. The gross earnings aggre- 
gated $64,715.94. 



It is a pleasure to drop into Zinkand's after the 

theatre, eat of the good things set before you there, and 
listen to the excellent music. The best people in town 
make Zinkand's their headquarters. 



J- O. II ahron, Pres., 

THOS. RlCKABD, l8t. 

Vice-President 



Formerly ot 
Parke & Lacy Co. 



JA. 
(.Fill 



.. J. McCowe, 2nd Vice 
President. O 
Hon Fd'y.VtrelniaCity 



HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE 

21 AND 23 FREMONT STREET. 

nining machinery £?„,,.. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 



Sierra Railway Co. of California 



Gross Earnings and Operating Expenses for quarter ending 
March 31, 1902. 



Freight - - 
Passenger - 
Miscellaneous 



$35,020 40 

■ 16,801 91 

2,893 63 



Gross Earnings - - - - -$54,715 94 
Operating Expenses - - - 22,792 79 

Earnings over Operating Expenses $31,923 15 



BLAKE, MOFFITT 
&TOWNE 



Dealers 
in 



TELEPHONE MAIN 199 



PAPER 



55-57-59-61 First Street, San Franoisco. 

Blake, Moffitt & Towne, Iios Angeles. Ca 
Blake, MeFall & Co., Portland, Or. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 




SONG. 
(Lady Helen Forbes in the Rambler.) 
Love lies bleeding! 
Yet the Sun is still a-shining in the Forest, 

And the Birds are singing joyfully. 
The bright Day to you, happy Birds, whisp'ring Woodlands, 
The dark, dark Night to me! 

Hope lies weeping! 
The long, long Tears of Self-despite and Sorrowing, 

And Faith has breathed her last soft sigh! 
Yet the glad Wind carols thro' tne swinging Branches, 

The Maids go dancing by. 

Life lies stricken! 
Yet our heartless Mother Nature laughs and frolics, 

And the Fish are leaping in the Stream. 
The new Dawn to you, smiling Lawns, rippling Brooklets, 

It flies me like a dream. 



A GREETING. 



(Frank L. Stanton In Atlanta Constitution. 
This greeting, Felise, o'er the waste of the years — 

This rollicking greeting to you: 
After the sunlight — the rain o' the tears — 

How do you do? 
I have quaffed the bright wine, and the dregs of it, too — 
How is it, Felise, with you? 

This greeting. Felise, o'er the ruin of years, 

With an ominous future in view; 
Do you grieve for lost sunlight — regret the bright tears, 

And the skies that were blue? 
I would that my dreams had been dreams 'neath the dew, 
How is it, Felise, with you? 

This greeting, Felise! . . . Let the world work its will — 

Let Fortune and Love leave us lone; 
We lifted the chalice with heart and with will, 

And Love was our own! 
I once reaped the roses, and heed not the rue — 
How is it, Felise, with you? 



A SERENADE. 
(Philadelphia Press.) 

Oh. lady, wake! the azure moon 

Is rippling in the verdant skies, 
The owl is warbling his soft tune, 

Awaiting but thy snowy eyes. 
The joys of future years are past, 

To-morrow's hopes nave fled away; 
Still let us love, and e'en at last 

We shall be happy yesterday. 

The early beam of rosy night 

Drives off the ebon morn afar, 
While through the murmur of the light 

The huntsman winds his mad guitar. 
Then, lady wake! my brigantine 

Pants, neighs, and prances to be free; 
Till the creation I am thine; 

To some rich desert fly with me. 



A SONG. 

(Wilbur I'uderwood in Mirror.) 

Little winds that run 
Over the flowered land. 
Golden wine of the sun 

Poured with the air from verge to verge, 
Brimming the hollow of my hand — 

Teach me to forget the urge, 
The dark desire to understand. 

Make me for this brief hour 

Unvexed as the grasses nigh. 
Sure as the slender flower, 

Vast as the wind-swept sky, 
Unheeding and unasking 

The whither and the why. 



BANKING. 
London and San Francisco Bank, Limit** 

424 OALI FORNIA STREET. 
HEAD OFFICE— 55 Old Broad street. London. 



Capital Authorized. 12.500,000. 



Capital Paid Up, $1,400,000. 



Director* — Henry Gosohen, Chairman, London: Chrlitlan de Gulgne, 
San Francisco; Charles Hemery, London; John L. Howard, San Fran- 
cisco; Bendix Koppel, London; Grevtlle Honsley Palmer, London; Norman 
D. Hideout, San Franclsoo; Arthur Scrivener, London. 

Agents In New York, Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. 

BRANCHES: Portland, Oregon; Tacoma, Wash., Seattle, Wub- 

Letters ol oredlt Issued available lor travelers and the purchase ol mer- 
chandise in any oily of the world. Deal In foreign and domestic exoha nge 
Accounts ol country banks received. Terms on application. 
A. L. Black. Cashier W. Mackintosh, Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. $8,000,000. Reserve Fund, $2,000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over $70,000,000- 

Hon. Geo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker. General Manager. 

J. H. Plummer, Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— 60 Lombard St-.E- C. S. Cameron Alexander. Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE— 16 Exchange Place. Alex. Laird and Wm. Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon District 
Dawson, White Horse; British Columbia: Atlln, Cranbrook, Ferule 
Greenwood, Eamloops, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, Sandon, 
Vanoouver, Victoria- In the United States — New York, N. Y. San Fran- 
oIboo, Cal- Seattle, Wash- Portland, Ore- Skagway. Alaska- 
Bankers In London — The Bank ol Scotland; Messrs- Smith, Payne & Smiths 
Bankers In New York — The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents in Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans. 
—The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franolsoo Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Kalns, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cos. Sansomb and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital te.600.U00 Pald-Up Capital. t2.0Wi.lxjo 

Reserve Fund. (1,050.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street. London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Aeencr ol the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Fierce 4 de. 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities o! the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIO. OBEENEBAUM. Manager. 
II. T. a. GREEN. Sub-Munaeer. 
B. ALTSCHTJL. Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner ol Sansome and Pine Sts., San Francisco 
JAS. K. WILSON, President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Oowgill. Cashier F. W. Wolfe. Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL $600,000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. $147,000. 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson. Win. J Dutton.Wm. Pierce Johnson. Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierue, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Shawmut Bank ; Philadel- 
phia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago—Continental National Bank. St. Loult — The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London— Biown, 
Brown. 8hipley A Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes 8l Co. Denver— Natloual 
Bank ol Commerce- Johannesburg — Robinson South African Bank'g Co. 
Ltd. ^___ 

Germania 1 rust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, $450,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts ol Individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 
Legal Depository for money In Probate Court proceedings. Interest 

PAID ON TRUST DEPOSITS AND SAVINGS. INVESTMENTS carefully Selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President: W. A. Frederick, vice-President ; H. 
Brunner, Cashier; J. C. Rued, Trust Officer. 

Board of Auditors— A. G. W lei and. Geo. W. Bauer and J- C. Rued. 

Board ol Director*— F. Kronenberg, Fred A. Kulile. F'ed Woerner. W, A. 
Frederick, F. C. Siebe. John Rapp, Walter M. Willett and Herman L. E. 
Meyer, E. A. Denlcke. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cos. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London. E. O. 

Paid Up $1,600,000 

Reserve Fund... 700.000 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co.. 31 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic translers, and issues letters of oredlt available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEDXHART. P. N. IJXD3NTHAL. Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St Mills Building 



Capital Authorized $6,000,000 

Subscribed 8.000.000 



NTBRE9T PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

William Alvord 
William Baboock 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 

8. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
F. Montcagle 



II . H, Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutohon 
R. H. Pease 



July 26, t902. 

Iconoclast 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



Deplores 

Persona.lit.es 



He says that It is a good thing that the tall lady on top of 
the Dewey monument is made of brass, else she could 
never look so long into the upper windows of a French 
restaurant. 

Editor News Letter — Dear Sir: I have just made a call 
on the Public Koolkiller. a nioe old gentleman wlm i 
among the microbes in the City and County Hospital. He 
tells me that he has read with pain tin- Havings of Truth 
as printed in the last week's News Letter. Ho says that 
it hurt his professional pride to think that such an advanced 
case should hare gone so long unattended. This leads 
me to hope that Truth's melodious bray will be caught in 
a crescendo passage and lopped off utterly before his next 
installment goes to press. 

Truth forcibly declares that I am not logical. I am, too, 
logical ! 

Speaking of cats, the rhinoceros is my favorite dish. 

So there: 

Truth declares that it is not gentlemanly for me to snore 
while reading his communications. Perhaps not; but one 
cannot be polite at all times — and if I must be impolite 
I am sure that I would prefer to act so in Truth's company 
than in the presence of anybody I know of. I would not 
say an impolite thing to Truth, no not for worlds, but is it 
possible that the gentleman expects me to stay awake in 
his presence? That is more than one gentleman could ask 
of another. (I paraphrase from Colonel Kowalsky.) 

Truth has made me ashamed of myself. He has not only 
shown me up as impolite, but has reminded me that I am 
"fond of indulging in personalities, another form of news- 
paper combat." I acknowledge that I was a bit harsh in re- 
ferring slightingly to Truth's figure, temperament and men- 
tal poverty. Hereafter I shall try and copy Truth's purely 
impersonal manner of calling me an 

1. Eggregious ass. 

2. Infidel. 

3. Traitor. 

4. Boor. 

5. Vulgarian. 

6. Shallow, addle-pated, ignorant upstart, without brains 
enough to realize his (my) own deficiencies. 

7. Scoffing ass. 

8. Blasphemous "Iconoclast." 

Truly, Truth is stranger than a historical novel. 

Meanwhile, the Dewey monument continues to rear its 
pallid blocks toward the sky. Mr. Aitken's work is done, but 
the bronzemaker is keeping good and busy moulding a lady 
tall enough and brazen enough to peep into the upstairs 
windows of the French restaurant overlooking Union Square. 
And the loungers, policemen, sandwich men, nurse-girls 
and baby-carriages that pass that way in future generations 
shall pause a moment and reflect that George Dewey was 
either the inventor of the Carnegie Library or the composer 
of "Ain't Dat a Shame?" 

Yours somewhat languidly, 

ICONOCLAST. 



Your suits will soon become old looking, baggy and 

shabby if you do not have them pressed and cleaned 
regularly. Send them to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing 
Works, 127 Stockton street, where they will he put in proper 
shape. They also clean gloves, cravats, curtains, laces, 
gloves and all such goods. Their work is unexcelled. 

The immense patronage of the Grand Hotel Cafe, 

Fay & Foster, proprietors, is evidence that the business men 
and club men of San Francisco appreciate a good thing. 
Mercantile lunch from 11 to 2 daily. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

J6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat-producing qualities Briquettes are superior to 
coal. Sold by the Tesla Coal Co., 10th and Channel. 'Phone, 
South 95. 



BANKING. 

Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank 



V\N rRANCISCO 



Capital, Surplu*. sad UodMdad 
Proflt*. July 31, HOI. 



$"»,58 1,240.2a. 



DrDLET K.TA5B. Acting President : IImmf.r M. Kixo. Manager- II. Wads- 
woetr Cashier: F.I.. I.ipmak, Asst. Cahhikr: II. I„ Millkr, Ami. Cashier. 

BRAlvrnKa— Kew York; Halt Lake. Utah; Portland. Or. 
Correspondenta throughout the World. General Banking business Iran* 
pacted. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA 8TREKT. 8. P. 

Deposit* Jan. 1, 1902... 180,026.482 Reserve Fund tr.3fl.90S 

Paid-up Capital 1.000.000 Contingent Fund 480,204 

B. B. POND. President W. C. B. DeFREMERT. Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors — Henry F. Allen, Thomas Maeree. W. O. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt. George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jaoob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
landsln the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Franolsco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo A Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank oommences only with the 
reocipt of the money. 

No charge 1b made for pass book or entranae fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenlngB, for receipt of de- 
posits only 6:30 to R o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 82.000.000- 

Surplus, 91,000,000. 

Undivided Profits. July 1, 1902, 83.027,997.88. 

WELLIAM ALVORD .President I THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHARLES R. BISHOP Vice-Pres't I. F. MOTJLTON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary I SAM H. DANIELS Ass't Cashte, 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co. ; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore — The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawm ut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. LouIh — Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev. — Agenoy o! The Bank of California. London — Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild A Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit issued, available In all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,347,387.58 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1,000 000.00 

Deposits June 80. 1902 31.698.792.56 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
John Lloyd; Second Vice-President, Daniel Meyer. 

H. Horatmann, Ign. St*>lnhart, H. B. Rubs, Emll Rohte, N. Ohlandt, and 
I. N. Walter. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Sec- 
retary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Mullen General Attor- 
ney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000.000. Paid Up Capital 8800,000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson. Assistant Cashier. 

DlRECTORS-^James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Ohas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. Charles Holbrook: 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
olty banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital.. 812, 000, 000 Profit and Reserve Fund... 8250,000 
Pald-ln-Capltal 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over. 100,000 

Its Purpose ib to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Homo Opfiob— S. W. Cor. California and Battery Streets, flan Franolsco 

Wm. Corrin, General Manager 

Crocker- WoolWorth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Cohnhr Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81.000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Gho. W. Kline, Cashier 

O. E. Gbbbn, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant C&flhlei 

Directors— W. H. Orooker. B. B Pond. George Crocker. O. E. Green, G.W. 
Henry Kline, T. Scott G. W. Scott 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 




&W^)l?^. 



murance 




Aside from the loss by the Scottish Union and National 
of assistant manager Kelly, now comes the report that Mr. 
Philip Smyth, who has been assistant cashier for twenty 
years in the office of the Scottish Union and National insur- 
ance company, has resigned to form a connection with the 
New York agency of the Fire Association of Philadelphia, 
and will remove to that city. It looks as if the Scottish Un- 
ion and National will soon be left without any of its old 
reliables. 

• • • 

The Colorado business for 1901 shows the following to- 
tals: Fire — Insurance written, $204,780,480; premiums re- 
ceived, $2,615,625; losses incurred, $1,023,895. Life — Insur- 
ance written, $18,676,013; premiums received. $2,873,350; 
losses incurred, $972,911. Miscellaneous — Insurance written. 
$110,748,577; premiums received, $680,836; losses incurred, 
$286,253. The amount of life insurance in force December 
31, 1901, was $77,928,280 against $69,004,296 on December 
31, 1900. 

* * * 

The end of the United States Mutual Accident Associa- 
tion has finally been reached. The receiver has been receiv- 
ing for seven years and realized almost $87,000. The ad- 
mitted claims were in excess of $126,000. and the final re- 
port of the receiver shows that there is on hand with which 
to pay these claims $2.79. It appears that the receiver has 
allowed this $2.79 to escape him. and he should be severely 
reprimanded, if not punished, for his carelessness in this 
particular. As stated in his report the "balance" has gone 
for expenses. As an illustration of the values, virtues and 
benefits accruing to the position of a receiver of a co-opera- 
tive accident insurance association commend us to this. 
It is simply unparalleled in the realm of thievedom. 

* • * 

June let up on the fire loss materially, the total for the 
United States and Canada being, according to the Commer- 
cial Bulletin, $10,245,350, as compared with $14,866,000 for 
May. The June loss in 1901 was $9,590,000 and the same 
month in 1900, $21,281,000. The total for the first six months 
of this year was $87,105,850, and for the same period last 
year, it was $88,926,150. 

m m * 

Not a single passenger was killed by the railroad train 
service in England last year, which is a pointer for the ac- 
cident men. 

• • • 

The United Railways and Electric Company of Baltimore 
has made an agreement with its 3,000 employees to pay the 
family of any one of them accidentally killed while in the 
company's service, the sum of $1,000 indemnity. This is a 
departure the outcome of which is problematical, and the 
action of the Baltimore corporation may have been influ- 
enced by the recent compulsory insurance enactment passed 
by the last Maryland legislature. 
■ • * 

In a suit of a telephone company against the Maryland 
Casualty, the Minnesota Supreme Court has rendered a 
decision, in which it holds that the accident company is not 
liable under the policy unless it is at once notified of the 
accident. This decision is worthy of note. In the case 
in question an employee of the telephone company met 
with an accident. The telephone company failed to give 
any notice to the insurance company from which it had 
secured its liability policy. A year later the employee sued 
the telephone company and received a judgment for $750. 



The telephone company then demanded payment from the 
casualty company, and got, as it deserved to get, a ver- 
dict against itself. The provision in the policy requiring 
the immediate notice in event of any injury upon which 
claims may be brought is fair and equitable. Were this 
provision not forced by the courts, companies would be 
easily the prey of unscrupulous claimants seeking to re- 
cover compensation for accidents or injuries of such an ul- 
terior date as to render an investigation of proof of the 
justice of the same absolutely impossible. 

• • • 

A town in Massachusetts, by its M'ayor, has put its fire- 
men to work and ordered that all alterations about fire 
stations be made by the firemen. This rule is enforced in 
Boston, in Providence, R. I., and other large Eastern cities, 
and has been found to work satisfactorily. The firemen do 
not seem to object, and it is a matter of economy. 

• • • 

President Sylvester C. Dunham of the Travelers Insurance 
Company, has gone to Europe for a brief rest. 
m * • 

The home office report of the Royal Exchange Assurance 
Company's business for 1901 shows that after deducting 
the sums paid for re-assurance, amounted to £518,123 10s., 
being an increase over 1900 of £39,625. The fire losses, after 
making provision for all claims, amounted to £320,111, 
being 61.78 per cent of the premiums. The expenses of 
management amounted to £87,626, and the commission to 
£82,947, or together to £170,574, being 32.92 per cent of the 
fire premiums. Interest on the fire funds yielded £8,057, and 
the result of the year's working showed a balance of £35,- 
456, which has been carried to profit and loss account. The 
fire fund has been increased by a transfer of £25.000 from 
the profit and loss account, and now stands at £225,000 as 
a special reserve for outstanding risks. This is a handsome 

snowing, indeed. 

• * • 

The convention season is at band, and the following are 
the dates of some of the principal gatherings: Annual meet- 
ing of the International Association of Fire Engineers, at 
New York, September 16 to 19; annual meeting of the Na- 
tional Association of Insurance Commissioners, at Columbus, 
Ohio, September 23d, 24th and 25th, annual meeting of the 
National Life Underwriters at Cincinnati, Ohio, October 
15th to 17th; annual meeting of the National Association of 
Local Fire Insurance Agents, at Louisville, Ky., October 

21, 22 and 23. 

■ • » 

Commissioner Dearth of Minnesota, in the advance sheets 
of his insurance report, gives the following list of wild cats 
which they are operating in that State, and warns the public 
that they are "entirely irresponsible, financially and from 
every other standpoint": Alexandria, Alexandria; Amazon, 
Charleston, W. Va.; Capital, Jackson, Miss.; Central, Chi- 
cago, 111.; Citizens, Chicago, 111.; Commercial Fire, Wil- 
mington, Del.; Commonwealth, Chicago, 111.; Commonwealth 
Savings and Ins. Co., Richmond, Va.; Cotton and Woolen 
Manufacturers Mutual, Boston Mass.; Fire Association of 
New York. New York City, N. Y.; Georgia Industrial, At- 
lanta, Ga. ; Germania Fire, Chicago, 111.; Great Britain Ins. 
Co., London; Indiana Underwriters, Indianapolis, Ind.; In- 
diana Ins. Co., Indiana. Ind.; Industrial, Boston, Mass.; 
Interstate, Chicago, III.: Keystone Mutual. Philadelphia. 
Pa.; Lincoln Ins. and Banking Co., Hammond. Ind.; Lum- 
bermen's Mutual. Chicago, 111.; Manton Mut. Fire, Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; Mercantile Mutual Fire. Providence, R. I.; Mer- 
cantile Fire, Chicago, III.; Mercantile F. and M.. Washing- 
ton, D. C.J Mutual Fire. Baltimore, Md.; Narragansett Mut- 
ual Fire. Providence, R. I.; National Mutual Church, Chi- 
cago, 111.: Northern, Chicago, 111.; Northwestern Fire, Chi- 
cago, 111.; Patapsco Mutual Fire. Baltimore, Md.; Prairie 
State, Chicago, 111.; Pulaski Mutual. Chicago. 111.: Rubber 
Manufacturers Mutual. Boston, Mass.; Security F. and M.. 



July 26. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



Washington. IV I".; Security Mutual Kir.. Omaha 
Underwriters at Standard Lloyds, New York City. N V : 

n Fire, Chicago, 111 : Western Kin-. Marino and 
Glass. Chicago. III.; Western, Aurora. 111. 

In this list nrc a Dumber of names not unfamiliar to some 
of the manufacturing establishments of the coast 
sinner Dearth speaks by the card understanding); and It 
may be well for some of the cheap rate Insurers to over- 
haul their policies and discard any of the above as being 
of no value and unreliable. 

• • • 

It Is reported that President John A. MeCall. of the N. w 
York Life Insurance Company, has just purchased fifty 
acres of land adjoining Long Branch, N. J., upon which he 
proposes to erect a mansion. Who says there is not money 
In the life insurance profession? 



Southfield Wellington Coal 
recommended by the best dulers. 



Unexcelled for liberality and security 

Life, Endowment, Accident and 
Health Policies 

The Pacific Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 



of California. 



Home Office: 

Pacific Mutual Building 

8an Francisco 



C IRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 
PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (limited) 



OF LONDON ENGLAND 



O. P. MTJIXINS. Manager," 416-418 California street. S. F. 

F1JRE INSURANCE 

Northern Assurance Gompany. 

OF LONDON .^^'CISMaX. AND ABERDEEN 



Cash Assets 

$20,000,000 

221 Sansome Street, 




i Geo. F. Grant 
Manager 

San Franciaeo. 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(Incorporated by the State of New York.) 

Assets, over $74,000,000. Liabilities, $64,000,000 

Surplus, over $9,000,000. 

Issues policies tor all approved forms of Insurance; adapted to 
all stations and circumstances of life. Policies are free from re- 
strictions as to travel and residence; are clear, conclBe business 
contracts, and conditions are plain and simple and easily under- 
stood. 

Pacific Coast head office: Hayward Building, corner Califor- 
nia and Montgomery streets, San Francisco. Home Office— New 
York City. 

John R. Hegeman, President; Haley Fiske, Vice-President; 
Oeo. H. Gaston, Second Vice-President; Geo. B. Woodward, 
Third Vice-President; James S. Roberts, Secretary; Thornton R. 
Richardson, Assistant Secretary; A. S. Knight, Medical Direc- 
tor; Thomas H. Wlllard, Medical Director; Eugene M. Holden, 
Assistant Medical Director. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 



INSURANCE. 




%£d *<& 




LONDON ASSURANCE. 
OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Bnbsorlbed $4,482,750 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,376 

* »»<■ t« 19,186,145 

Oaptul SnbMrilMd $5,000,000 

Capital Paid l'i> 500,000 

Assets. 2,502.060 

Fouuded A. D. 1792 



Cc 



nsurance Company o 



)f North A 



merica 



N. Schleasinger, City Agent. 



304 Montgomery St., 8. F. 



OF rHILADELPHIA. PENH. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders $5,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. P. 

' Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D., 1720. 

Capital Paid Up, $3,446,100. Assets, $24,662,043.35 

Surplus to Policy Hldrs, $8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over $184,000,000 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH: 

601 Montgomery Street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON. Manaeer 
HERMANN NATHAN & PAUL F. KINGSTON. Looal Managers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF NBff Zealand 
Capital, $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's building, 312 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OP HARTFORD. Established 1850. 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 4,318,611.00 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,008,423.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Dept.. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 411 California St. 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

Established 1782. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 413 California St., S. F. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital $67,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. P. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERPURT, Germany. 
Capital, $2,250,000. Assets, $10,984,248. 

Voss, Conrad & Co., General Manager. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St., S. P. 

The Continental Fire Ins. Co. 

OF NEW YORK 

ARTHUR G. NASON & CO., Metropolitan Managers 

435 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Telephone Bush 381. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 




Highland Springs 



ALWAYS OPEN 

The famous health and pleasure resort of Lake County. Fin- 
est waters for the cure of Liver, Kidney, Malaria, Rheuma- 
tism and Stomach Troubles. Every comfort and amusement. 
Free swimming tank, Croquet, Tennis. Regulation bowling 
alley. Riding and driving horses. Splendid Trips to moun- 
tains or valley. 

NOTE SPECIAL RATES: 



One person in room. 
Two persons in room, 
One person in room, 
Two persons in room 
One person in room, 
Two persons in room, 



"small hotel.' $10.00 per week. 

"small hotel," $18.00 per week, 
'cottages," $11.00 per week. 

"cottages," $20.00 per week. ■ 
'Main Hotel," $12 and $14 per week. 
"Main Hotel," $20.00 and $22.00 per week 



Special Inducements for school teachers or families desiring 
to remain by the month. 

For descriptive circulars and analysis of the waters call on 
The Tourist Information Bureau, 10 Montgomery street, or 
the Traveler Office, 20 Montgomery street, or write direct to 
Craig & "Warner, Managers, Highland Springs, Lake County, 
California. 



Anderson Springs 



Only natural Mineral Steam 
Baths in Lake County 

14 distinct mineral springs of 8 different characters, hot and 
- cold. Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. Board: $}10 to $1-1 per 
week. Baths free. Address J. ANDERSON, Anderson 
Springs, Middletown, Lake County, California. 

Fare— San Francisco to Springs and return reduced to $8. Send for circu- 
lar. Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5% Kearny St.. San Francisco. 





■ 


HOTEL 
MATEO 

SAN HAIIO 
CAL. 

WFjENN & SP/}ULDING 
Prop'rs. 


A HIGH-CLASS SUMMER 
AND WINTER RESORT 


Reservations may now be 
made for August, Septem- 
ber, October, and the win- 
ter season. 



Hotel El Monte 



LOS GATOS 



Under new management Five minutes from depot. Now 
open for business. Table unsurpassed. 

RATES $8 to $15 Per Week. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the finest Static Galvanic sinusoidal and 
Paradic Electrical apparatus. A corps of well-trained nurses ot 
both sexes skilled in all forms of treatments and manipulations 

Rest cure scientifically carried out A quiet, home-like place 

beautiful scenery. Mt. Hamilton and the famous Lick Observa- 
tory In plain view; one block from electric cars; fifteen minutes 
walk from the center of the city. Terms: $10 to $20 per week 
Including medical attention and regular treatment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Joae, Cal. 



The Geysers 



One of the wonders of 
the world 



RATES— $10. 12 14 . 



New Man ace men t. Newly furnished. Rooms hard finished- 
First Class Table. Me%ls a la Carte. Dairy and Vegetable 
Garden, New Bath Houses. Electric Light. Swimming 
Pool. Twenty miles of the best fishing streams. Hunting. 

TFABIUS FERAUD. Lessee and Manager 



BEAUTIFUL 



Laurel Dell 



THE ORIGINAL SWTTZBR- 
LAND OP AMERICA. 



Largest dining-room in county; new myrtle cottage; 
hunting, boating, bathing, marine toboggan, new livery, 
coquet, tennis, bowling. Tally Ho coach free to guests 
daily to our mineral springs; 15 different kinds of 
water. 
Accommodations for three hundred people. 

E. DTJRNAN. 
Laurel Dell, Lake Co., Cal. 



Blue 



BOATING. BATHING. FISHING AND HUNTING. New launches ana 
boats, Tennis court and all other amusements. 

J1EDICAL SPRINGS 

Our famous "White Sulphuh." Spring. Hot and Cold Baths, and eto 
Fend for new pamphlet. O. WBI8MAN, Midlake P. O.. Lake Co.. Cal 

or call at office of O. N. W. W. B. B. Co., 650 Market Street. 



Lakes 



Hotel Benvenue and cottages 

LAKEPORT, CAL. 

LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking the 
shore on Clear Lake. New pavilion, boat-house, and bowling alley. 
Open all the year. Special facilities for accommodating families 
with children; home cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and super- 
ior Ashing. Lovely drives and walks. New sanitary plumbing. 
Modern improvements. Re-furnished, re-decorated. Rates: $8, 
$10, %V1 per week. Special rates to families. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



Skaggs 



HOT SPRINGS. Sonoma County: only 4% 
houra from S. F., and but 9 miles staging; 
waters noted for medicinal virtues; best 
natural hot mineral water bath In State; 
boating and swimming in Wwm Spring 
Creek; good trout streams; telephone, telegraph, dally msfl. express, and 
S, F. morning and evening papers, First-olaas Hotel and Stage Service. 
Both morning and afternoon stuges; round trip from S. F. only $5.60. Take 
Tiburon Ferry at 7:30 a, m. or 3.30 p. m. Sundays, 8 a. m. only. Rates. $2 a 
day or 812 a week. References: Any guest of the past seven years. Pa- 
tronage of 1901 unprecedented. J. F. MTJLGREW, Skaegs. Cal. 

Congress Springs. 

A charming resort in the Santa Cruz Mountains; 2 hours from San 
Francisco; dellerhtful climate; STCimniing- and all sports: table* 
unsurpassed; best mineral water on the coast: open all the year. 
K H. GOODMAN. Manaeer. 



WISDOM CONSISTS in doing the right thing at the right 

time. 
WE ARE ALL WISE — afterwards — when It is too late. 
THE TIME to take care of your health is when you have it. 
NEVER ALLOW yourself to get into a rut or a groove, 

either physically or mentally. 
BREAK the monotony that makes so many men and women 

old long before their time. 
TAKE an occasional trip. 

THE COUNTRY along the California Northwestern Railway 
is not the only place to visit, but it certainly Is the best. 
ITS LOCATION between the coast and the interior affords 

that salubrious climate which invites living in the 

open air, and fills up the system with renewed energy. 
CALL or write for 

" VACATION, 1902," 

A little book issued by the California Northwestern Rail- 
way Company, (The Picturesque Route of California) giv- 
ing Camping Locations, Hotels, Mineral Spring Resorts, 
and a long list of Country Homes where board for the Sum- 
mer can be secured at from $6.00 to $8.00 per week. 

Ticket Offices. 650 Market St.. (Chronicle Bnlldlnel and Tiburon Ferry, foot 

of Market St. General Office Mutual Life Building. Sansome 

and California Sts. San Franclsoo. 

H,'C. WHITING Gen'l. Manaeer . K. X. RYAN.Gen'l. P.... Asl 



July 26, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



26 



OBITUARt. 
The death of General \V. H. I. 
Kr»n> of its most dutlnguii n9 — a m»n 

whom all wan delighted to honor, ami whose name was fa 
miliar all over tba Dnltod States. A- i soldier, In 
orator and statesman he made a record of which any man 
might uo proud. His high personal qualities endeared him 

few men who lind BO mall] 
admirers ami true friends as Genera] Han 

William Henry Llnow Barnes was horn at West Point, 
Fork, where his father was an Instructor, on February 
16. In isr.i be was admitted to Fall i 
he won high honors In scholarship and oratory, and in 
1854 graduated at the head of his class. Later be studied 
law, and after his admission to the bar returned to New- 
York. When the Civil War broke out he had a good prac- 
tice, but he promptly enlisted in the Seventh New York 
Volunteers. He was made Captain and aide-decamp on the 
staff of Major-General Fitzjohn Porter, and in that capacity 
he served all through the war. His war experience injured 
his health, so as soon as he was discharged he came to 
California. We won a case on the second day after his 
arrival here. Senator Casserly having entrusted him with 
some law business. This led to the formation of the law 
Arm of Barnes & Casserly. When Casserly was elected to 
the United States Senate all the immense business of 
the firm went to General Barnes, who soon became recog- 
nized as one of the most able attorneys in the State. He was 
selected as legal adviser of the great railroad companies, 
and also numbered among his clients such corporations as 
Wells, Fargo & Co., the Western Union Telegraph Co., the 
California Bank and the London and San Francisco Bank. 
He always took an active interest in military affairs. For 
six years he was Colonel of the First California Regiment, 
and during the Kearny riots he was made Major-General, 
in command of all the troops of California. 

General Barnes was always active in public life. As an 
orator he had few peers in the United States, and was in 
demand upon all notable occasions. He was a member 
of the Union League, Bohemian and other clubs, and was 
one of the most popular members. He was twice married, 
leaving a widow and two children, attorney W. S. Barnes and 
Lieutenant J. M. Barnes. He was buried Thursday from the 
Masonic Temple, with services by the California Comman- 
dery, Knights Templar. The funeral was a military one, and 
large and impressive. 

James Rodgers Garniss, the pioneer broker and insurance 
agent, died suddenly Wednesday morning of heart disease. 
He was a native of New York, 73 years of age, and came 
to California in 1849. For awhile he followed a mercantile 
career, besides his regular profession of the law. In 1855 
he was made a Justice of the Supreme Court of California. 
He had a very successful business career, and was one of 
the original San Francisco underwriters, a vocation which 
he continued until the time of his death. He was twice 
married, and leaves a widow and a nephew, Mr. James G. 
Mudgett. He belonged to the Odd Fellows, Masons, Society 
of California Pioneers, and Knights Templar. 




NEAREST THE CITY 



California and Foreign Marbles 
African Colored Marble and Onyx 



W. H. McCORMICK 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

All Kinds of Marble and Granite 

115 CITY HALL AVENUE, NEAR LARKIN ST. San Franuisco, Cal. 



5ummer Resorts 



Arcadia 

CAMPUS SIATION 

Bulla Crag M"'iutnhi» 

Delightfully located 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 

FATH1NG, FISHING, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 

Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 




B0WLING=== 



For the summer the Hotel Vendome management nnnoniices 
man> new attractions at that popular resort. Two maerniNce nt 
Hwimmiiig pools are near the hotel, and quests may have all tlio 
pleasures of seaside resorts. 

===swmniNQ 

Bowline, erolf, tennis and ping- pone are amone the m ny diver- 
sions. Johannsen's Orchestra will be there all the time. Auto- 
mobile coachine from the hotel throughout the valley. 

GEORGE P. SNELL, Manager. 

At Hotel Vendome, 

SAN JOSE. 



BAY STATE HOUSE AND COTTAGES 

Santa Ckuz— Sunny rooms, good table, best service; reason- 
able rates. MRS. L. MATHIfcSON, Proprietress. 

BEN LOMOND Park House aniJ Cottages; an ideal re- 
sort, unsurpassed climate, drives, fish- 
ing and bunting, two hours' ride to Big Basin. Moderale prices. 
MRS. I. N. HAYES, Proprietor. 

Agua Caliente Springs o*iiiS2..'I!o7 n H3»«. 

Quaintly situated, surrounded by mountains and woodland, and consist- 
ing of three difleient hot "prince. Reached directly by trains of the Cali- 
fornia Northwestern Railway or those of the Southern Pacific Santa Rosa 
Line, (noatagrii'e) New Hotel, eauipped with modern improvements, ac- 
commodating: 200 eruesta, Swimming: Bath, private Bath. Ball Room, M usic. 
Livery, fine Drives Tennis Court; Ratea 82 and $2.50 a Day; 812 and 814 a 
week. Special terms for Families Wend lor illustrated booklet. Theodore 
Richards. Agrua Caliente, Sonoma County, Cal, The Half-Fare Sunday Ex- 
cursions on the California Northwestern Railway enab e visitors to spend a 
3ay at the Springs, returning: to the City on the same evening. 



Byron 

Hot 

Springs 

Contra Costa Co. 
CAL. 



A SANITARIUM AND RESORT 

The new hotel is the finest on the Coast. Elegrantly 
furnished rooms an'i suites with private mineral 
baths. AH modern improvements for comfort and 
safety. Excellent cuisine and a" air of home com- 
fort. Rheumatism and Malaria yield quickly to 
these wonderful waters and baths. 

AddreBs Manager Lewis, Byron Hot Springs, Cal, 
Call on Lombard & Co., 36 Geary Street, S. F. 



\l/l,u fl C--1«tm*. Ctti.;**,*.^ SONOMA COUNTY CAL. 

White bulpnur bpnngs romantic spot and cura- 
tive Waters. 

These famous spring-s are located at the foot of Taylor Mountain, two-and- 
one half miles south of Santa Rosa, The waters are valuable as a curative 
in many ailments. The hotel and cottage are on an elevation overlooking: 
Santa Rosa and the beaulif .il surrounding: country. The climate is always 
delightful and invieoratine. Accommodation for sixty. Fine drives, boa-ing-, 
billiard, croquet grounds, dancing: pavilion, hunting: and first-class table. 
Free sulphur baths, hot oreold. Rheumatism, blood, skin and chronic dis- 
eases treated by eompeienl Dhysician. Poslti.e cure. Hammnn bath in con- 
nection. Rales: adults, 810 and 812 per week; children under ten, half rates. 
Special rates to families. ake boat, Tiburon Ferry, 7:30 a. m. or 3:30 r m. 
Fare, 81.50 to Santa Rosa. Bus meets trains. Address: E. HAWES, White 
Sulphur springs, Santa Rosa, Oal. Open all year around. Telephone: 
"White Sulphur -prinea. 

For best buffets, bars and sideboards and the medicine cabi- 
nets, "Jesse Moore"— pure rye or bourbon whisky— has no equal. 



26 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves. 

When they take the beautiful woman 
from the wreck she begs to be let 
to die. "I have nothing to live for!" 
she cries. "You are mistaken as to 
that," they argue, gently. "For, see, 
what a swell shape the collision has 
battered your hat into." Now she 
opens her eyes, and it is plain that 
new courage has entered her heart. 

"I cannot live without you!" Geral- 
dine's satin slipper beat the carpet im- 
patiently. "You have told other girls 
that!" she said with froideur. "Yes, 
but on my honor as a gentleman never 
when the cost of living was what it is 
this summer!" protested Bevis, falling 
on his knees before her. 

"But how, pray, can a man be his 
own worst enemy?" "Well, I should 
think it might rather easily come about 
through his trying to raise flowers 
and keep hens, too," observed the sub- 
urbanite, after a moment's reflection. 

George W. Perkins tells a story of an 
Irishman who, while walking with his 
friend, passed a jewelry store where 
there were lots of precious stones In 
the window. "Would you not like to 
have your pick?" asked Pat. "Not me 
pick, but me shovel," said Mike. 

"The assessor hasn't listed your prop- 
erty at one-tenth of what it is worth? 
Then why don't you increase your as- 
sessment voluntarily? "I did that last 
year, and everybody said I was making 
a grand-stand play for popularity." 

"I've just been reading some statis- 
tics of births and deaths. Extraordi- 
nary thing! Every time t breathe a 
man dies." "Great Scott! Why don't 
you chew cloves!" 

Ida — But Belle always said Harry was 
"one man in a million." Why did she jilt 
him? May — Oh, she found one man 
with a million. 

"Why, Willie," said his teacher, "what 
makes your head so red?" "Aw, I just 
had scarlet fever and it settled in 
me head." 

"Is she fashionable?" "Oh. yes, in- 
deed! I'm sure she loves her husband 
dearly; yet she conceals the fact beau- 
tifully." 

"I see that the Chicago packers use 
all of the pig except the squeal." "Why 
not use that in making phonographs?" 




In every town 

and village 
may be had, 
the 

Mica 

Axle 

Grease 

that makes your 
horses glad. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 26, ,902. 

fi "The Stretched 

Q Forefinger of all Time" is 

w on the dial of an 

I Elgin Watch 

•M — the world's standard for pocket time- 

M pieces. Perfect in construction; positive 

IM in performance. Sold by every jeweler in 

J^ the land; fully guaranteed. Booklet free. 



IM ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO. 

"VxT Elgin, Illinois. 



UNCLAIMED, MILLIONS. 

It will be remembered that, as pre- 
viously explained in this journal, a 
Dutchman who died in 1778 left an im- 
mense fortune to his nephew, with 
a proviso in the will that if the nephew 
died childless, the fortune was to re- 
main intact for a century, and then be 
divided among the next of kin. The 
nephew died childless and the money 
went into the keeping of executors who 
have since built a scientific museum 
at Haarlem and almshouses for old folk 
from the funds. But the century hav- 
ing expired, some of those who consider 
themselves to be the rightful heirs 
have commenced a legal process to 
recover possession of the money. When 
the case came before the court at Haar- 
lem in February last, no less than one 
hundred and ninety soi-disant heirs ap- 
peared, and the advocate who is at- 
tending to the matter for one branch 
of the family told the writer that he 
had advised nearly another hundred 
persons by letter not to put themselves 
to the trouble and expense of coming to 
court, as their attendance was not re- 
quired at the present stage of the pro- 
ceedings. "Look there!" said he, point- 
ing to a pile of letters quite two feet 
thick, "the writers of all those letters 
have something to tell me about the 
matter or something to ask. I am 
overwhelmed with communications on 
the subject, until I grow weary of 
opening them." 

For the guidance of those who may 
be inclined to join in as claimants 
it should be explained that the fiist 
thing to do is to obtain a clear geneal- 
ogical tree showing the claimants' de- 
scent from some member of the family, 
which will serve to show the line of 
descent of the representative claimant. 
The proceedings of February last were 
dismissed owing to a legal flaw, but the 
decision has been appealed against, and 
the further hearing will take place 
soon. 

In some parts of the Netherlands so- 
cieties have been formed by the claim- 
ants, each member contributing some- 
thing toward the legal expenses, and 
the members are thus able to obtain 
a lawyer's advice and assistance, which 
they could not probably do were each 
acting separately. 

Each year, upon the 25th of March, 
the anniversary of the birthday of Pie- 
ter Teyler, numerous gifts from the 



funds are presented to the inmates 
of the various almshouses in Haarlem, 
not only to those occupying the charities 
established from the Pieter Teyler funds 
but to the inmates of all the other 
institutions, irrespective of religion or 
denomination. — Collier's Weekly. 



Some time ago, a man presented him- 
self before the Liverpool magistrates 
with the following tale: "Me name is 

Patrick O'Connor an' I lives at 

street, an' I keep hens in my cellar, but 
the water pipes is burst, an' my hens is 
all drowned." "Well, my good man, we 
can do nothing for you; you had better 
apply to the water company." was .all 
the advice he got. A few days later 
the same man appeared with precisely 
the same tale. "You were here a few 
days ago, and we advised you to go to 
the Water Company. Did you do so?" 
"I did, your honor." "And what did 
they say to you?" "They told me to 
kape ducks." 



Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 

We welcome students with unlim- 
ited ambition and offer every facility 
for thorough work in all departments 
of Music, Literature and Elocution. 

Our new building is completed and 
sets the standard of the world. 
OLORGE W. CMADWICK, Director. 

All particulars and year-book will be sent by 
FRANK W. HALE, General Manager, Boston, Mass. 



I Can Sell Your Farm 

or other real estate for oneh, no matter where located 
Sentl description and selling price and learn my wonder.* 
fully successful plan. W. M. OSTRANDER. 
north American Building, Philadelphia, Fa. 




July 26. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




By Betsy Bird. 

The Breckenridge-M'urphy wedding has amazed society, 
and everyone is xeally wondering if papa Murphy is as 
angry as he pretends to be that he has a son-in-law who will 
probably one day be worth five or six millions of dollars, 
and whose connections place the Murphys among the very 
great socially. It Is said that one of the parent's objections 
is that his son-in-law Is not a Catholic. Mr. Murphy was 
born in South Carolina, but he never pretended to be an 
aristocrat, while his family has always been ambitious 
socially. Now, an ordinary father would consider the 
Tevises welcoming Adelaide as posing them forever. Ade- 
laide Breckenridge is considered the most finished flirt 
■n society. She makes a business of it, and starts out to 
make a conquest of women as well as men. One day she is 
liable to be very gushing as your dearest friend, and the 
next she will not see you at all. So while she could be the 
most popular girl in town if she chose she is not, because 
of her changeable moods. Mr. Breckenridge is given to re- 
citing poetry with much dramatic effect, and this is the 
first time he has ever been sufficiently espris to offer him- 
self in marriage, although he was a great admirer of Leon- 
tine Blakeman. He is tall, fair, bright and one of the hand- 
somest men in society. The girls all think Adelaide ha^ 
done rather a clever thing. She says she is glad to be away 
from messenger-boy rule, for if her father ever met her 
anywhere away from a chaperon he called in a messenger 
boy and sent her home by him. According to rumor she 
has been engaged twice before this year. Mr. Robinson 
Riley she lost to her best friend, Mrs. Andrew Martin, and 
Mr. Seifert, a handsome, wealthy fellow, whom she took as 
solace, she jilted, giving as a reason that he loved her too 
much. 

Mrs. Grant Selfridge, wife of Dr. Seifridge, has been en- 
tertaining Margaret Anglin a great deal. Mrs. Selfridge 
is very fond of theatrical people, and has entertained Miss 
Grace Elliston. Then last year she was the hostess of 
Damrosch, Gadski, and Bispham. It was at Mrs. Selfridge's 
that Damrosch played rag-time, and delighted society. 
She is one of the coming younger matrons. 

Katherene du Val, who is now in mourning, will be mar- 
ried in about six months from now to Lieutenant Stone, U. 
S. A., the brother of that handsome young woman, Miss 
Florence Stone. The Stones are the nieces and nephews of 
Mrs. L. L. Baker. 

The Ohiandt-Ames wedding of last week took place sev- 
eral months before it was intended. Six days before th.3 
marriage was not thought of. At the last moment it wa3 
decided upon, and everything was got ready in a hurry. 
Mrs. Harry Gray, the sister of the groom, has a double in 
name. There is another Mrs. Harry Gray, whose husband 
is of the firm of Gray Brothers, the contractors. The two 
Harry Grays resemble each other very much, although 
the wives do not. Mrs. Gray, nee Ames, is very tall, and ue 
other Mrs. Gray is short. She was a widow, a Mrs. Wilson, 
of Denver, and a sister of Mrs. "M'axy" Taber. 

Mrs. Walter Hobart has been thrown into mourning by the 
death of her father, formerly paymaster in the Navy. Mrs. 
Williams had been confined in a sanitarium for some time. 
Mr. and Mrs. Williams did not live together for years be- 
fore the death of the former. Mr. Wilberforce Williams has 
been very ill of late from typhoid fever, and at one time his 
life was despaired of. 



It seems that the n i h<- denial o( thi I 

ire thai Hi is annry Jn 

:il principle*, Bhe bellerei In the emancipation "f 
11 after they hare husbands, bol think 

th* alliance brilliant enough fur the cnat flouring mill 
house, so closely allied with the Crockers and Ponlatowskls. 
tin the other hand, Mr. Harold Crowell baa been the sup- 
port of his blind mother for years, ami she is decidedly 
against his marrying Miss Sperry or anyone else. The 
difficulties are certainly Interesting and romantic. Miss 
Sparry is one of the girls who frighten men horribly, for 
one day she sees them and the next she doesn't. She is 
known to walk up to a man and say: "Never speak i 
again," or remark casually, "I never saw ycu before," when 
one says "Good evening." 

Out at the Presidio they have been having informal 
officers' hops, where the ladies can wear shirt waists it they 
wish, and it fell to Mr. Jack Carrigan's lot to make up origi- 
nal figures for the germans. One was to tie two napkins 
together and then have the ladies jump over them. They did 




VAKNfcY W. GASKiLL, Special Agent 
With HILBERT BROS., Importers 

TELEPHONE BUSH 25 SAN FRANCISCO 



WEAR 



EAGLESON'S 

Fine Shirts and 
Underwear 



748 AND 750 MARKET STREET 
242 MONTGOMERY STREET 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 



this under protest. Finally he lay flat down on the floor 
and requested the other officers to do the same. Then he 
asked the ladies to come and jump over th'em. There was 
a howl of indignation from the army girls. The hops broke 
up, and it is said there are to be no more for a long time. 
Certainly Mr. Carrigan is original. 

Katherine Clement, the most popular dinner girl in society, 
has been thrown into mourning. I must say that with 
Laura McKinstry, Therese Morgan and Katherine Clement 
in mourning, the winter is to be rather dull. Miss Clement 
prides herself upon being the wittiest of the older girls, 
and she will chaff any one who comes along. She also, when 
she so desires, can be very rude, and when Mrs. Stuyvesant 
Fish of New York was out here a year or so ago, she started 
in by pretending never to have heard of Mrs. Fish. But the 
New Yorker was so rude to her that she made Miss Clement 
cry, for she can do that sort of thing pretty well herself. 



Mrs. Sidney Smith and daughters are among the visitors 
at Santa Barbara. The Gordon Blandings are at the new 
hotel at Lake Tahoe, as are the Popes, Miss Taylor, the 
Parrotts, and Mrs. Coleman. Mrs. Parrott and Miss Parrott 
will join them there next month. Mr. and Mrs. Lilley 
Williams are back from their wedding trip. Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick McNear attended the Oelriehs-Martin wedding. 
Mrs. Ellinwood and Miss Charlotte Ellinwood are visiting 
young Mr. Ellinwood in Placer County. Mr. and Mrs. Al- 
fred Bouvier are at Los Gatos. Mrs. Frederick Tallant and 
children are back from Tahoe. Mr. and Mrs. Homer King 
and their daughters, the Misses Hazel and Genevieve King, 
are soon to go to Tahoe Tavern. Mr. and Mrs. Brook Wright 
nee Beatty are the guests of the bride's parents. Judge and 
Mrs. Beatty. Mr. and Mrs. Percy Howard O'Brien have re- 
turned from their honeymoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sterling Postley are at the Hotel Del Monte. 

Miss Katherine Herrin is the guest of M'iss Elsie Sperry 
at Alta. Miss Aletka Williar and Miss Katherine Robinson 
are in the city again. Miss Ethel Tompkins is the guest 
of Miss Ella Goodall in Los Gatos. Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Highton are in Honolulu. Mrs. Davidson and Mrs. Harry 
Dibblee are prolonging their stay at Bolinas. Mr. and .Mrs. 
Willard Drown are looking for a house. The Will Tevises 
may purchase the C. P. Huntington house. Mrs. James 
Follis is in the city again. 

The wedding day of Miss Sophia Pierce and Dr. Edward 
Brownell is set for September 10th. Mr. George Robinson 
of the Willie Collier Company is the guest of his mother, 
Mrs. Luke Robinson, at the Cumberland. Miss Bernadoue 
Robinson is visiting friends in Colusa. Mrs. Albert Galla- 
tin and her daughter. Miss Lila Gallatin, with friends, are 
in El Dorado County. Mrs. James P. McCarthy, Mr. E. Avery 
McCarthy, and daughter, are at Lake Tallac. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Moore, Jr., are visiting at Highland 
Springs. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crocker and three children, 
Ethel, Willie and Helen. Mrs. J. Nuttall and her daughter, 
Miss Nadine Nuttall. make up one party at Highland 
Springs. Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Haynes are at Rowardennan. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Hopkins are entertaining at their place 
near Tahoe Mr. and Mrs. Latham M'cMullin and Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence I. Scott. Mrs. George Cadwallader and Miss 
Linda Cadwallader are at Tahoe. Mrs. I. Lawrence Poole 
is visiting the Brighams at Lake Tahoe. Miss Laura Mc- 
Kinstry and Miss Frances McKinstry are being entertained 
by Mrs. Hyde Smith in San Mateo. M'r. and Mrs. W, .1. 
Landers and Miss Bernice Landers are at San Leandro. Mrs. 
Robert Oxnard and Miss Lily O'Connor are at Lake Tahoe. 
Miss Marie Wells is at Aqua Caliente. Mr. ami Mrs. B. r. 
Kittridge have returned from Monterey and are at the 
Palace. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Robinson and Miss Elena Robin- 
son will go from San Jose next month to Supervirens Camp 
in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Mr. and Mrs. Clans Sprecfc 



els are expected home this week from Europe. Mrs. Wil- 
liam I. Kip and Miss Kip leave Thursday next for Los 
Gatos. Mrs. Kip will pass the winter with her son there. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Vanderbilt, Jr., will soon arrive in New 
York from Europe, and they will pass the summer with 
Mrs. Herman Oelrichs at Newport. Miss Bertha Dolbeer 
and Miss Warren will return from Monterey next week, 
and go to Tahoe for a month. Miss Ethel Keeney will re- 
turn home from the East nest month, and will join her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Keeney, at Tahoe. Mrs. 
Samuel Blair and Miss Jennie Blair will pass the winter in 
Yokohama, and later they will go to Europe. Mrs. Eugene 
Freeman will leave September 1st and place her daughter 
at school in New York. Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey Boardman 
will spend the winter in San Francisco. 

Mrs. Henry Sonntag and Mrs. George Toy have been 
thrown into mourning by the death of their mother, Mrs. 
Bovee. Miss Breckenridge has not yet joined her mother 
in Paris, but is still under a physician's care. Mr. Frank 
B. King has returned from New York. 

Mrs. Charles Bent will spend the coming winter in San 
Francisco. 

Mrs. Walter Hobart has been visiting her grandmother, 
Mrs. Neill, in San Rafael. Dr. and Mrs. MacMonagle have 
returned to their home in San Mateo. Mr. Joe Rosborough 
was the host at a "stag" tug party Saturday evening last. 
Miss Laura Scott, who has been East for a year, has re- 
turned to San Francisco. Mr. and M'ts. Kerr ami Miss 
Gertrude Kerr are still in Japan. They will go to India in 
October. 

Mrs. Lawrence Scott has been entertaining Miss Pearl 
Landers. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Luning will spend the Bummer 
in Cloverdale. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Deming and chauffeur 
arrived at the Hotel Del Monte in their automobile. .Mr. 
and Mrs. William G. Irwin gave a beautiful dinner at their 
residence recently in honor of Miss Lily Spreckels. The Ir- 
wins are en route for home. Mr. and Mrs. James Carolan, 
Miss Emily Carolan and Miss Genevieve Carolan hav. re- 
turned from Burlingame. Mr. Mayo Newhall has gone to 
Tahoe. Mr. and Mrs. Athearn Polger have returned from 
Tahoe to San Mateo. 

Mrs. Horace Hill visited the Brighams at Tahoe recently. 
Mrs. Oge and Miss Marie Oge left to-day for Pacific Grove. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Fletcher nee Tay of New York have 
been the guests of Miss Tay. Mrs. Fletcher will remain 
here until September. Miss Marie Voorhies has returned 
from Menlo. Mrs. Hanehett. mother of Mrs. George Crocker, 
has returned with her son from Capitola. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Constance Borrowe 
of Sausalito and Mr. William Blake of Boston. 

Another engagement announced is that of Miss Viola 
Kleineherg, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. C. Kleineberg, to En- 
sign Charles Huff, U. S. N. 

The most important marriage of the week was that of 
Miss Natalie Emilie Oelrichs of New York and Mr. Peter 
Martin of San Francisco. There were two matrons of honor. 
Mrs. Winslow and Mrs. Havemeyer. The youny couple will 
take a yachting trip and then return to Newport for the 
summer. 

The marriage of Miss Hazel Saunders, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Saunders, and Mr. Philip Thayer, took place at 
Duncan's Mills Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Thayer will i 
in this city. 



Visiting Cards 

Wedding Invitations 

and Announcements 
LE COUNT BROS. CO. 



633 MARKET STREET 



July 26. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



28 



Mr. anil MYs. Will T 
party at Tahoo. Mrs. Orant gave o lar^ 4 Inn 

■ -hi .1:1 at I'astorl's M<m>ln> 
party Wednesday ■ a I her homo in 9m R 

Mr nnrt Mrs. Frank Cnrolan. who Imvc nrrix. 
linsann- from New York, a recentlj at 

a dinner siren 1>> Mrs. Hermann Oelrlcba at Newport 

Mr> Cadwallader ami Miss Linda Cadwallader 

entertained Uai week in Sacramento by Mrs. \.i<>l|iii 

Mr. an.l MYs. George Boardman arc at the Hotel Del 
unnttord Wilson is at Lake Tahoe visiting 
Mr. anil Mrs. Will Tcvis. 

H. S. Crocker has been visiting Mrs. Mott In Sac- 
ramento. Mrs. Will Taylor has returned from a long stay 
with her si.-t.<r. Mis. Lewis, of Portland, and she now 
has gone to Tahoe. Captain Goodall is taking his vacation 
at Aralon. 

Mr. K. M. Greenway is at Tahoe. Mrs. James Keeney and 
children are at Tahoe. Miss Dunham, With some friends, has 
left Paris, and will go on some excursions in the country. 

The following are among those to arrive at the Hotel Del 
Monte August 1st: MYs. P. N. Lilienthal and family. Mr. W. 
B. Tubbs and family. Mr. Charles Lyons and family. Mrs. 
John D. Templeton, Mrs. A. Chabot, Miss Chabot, Mr. M. 
H. Walker and family, Mr. J. W. Byrne. Mrs. J. Irvine, Mrs. 
James Coffin, Miss Coffin, MYs. C. B. Hammond and party, 
Mrs. John M. Cutter and party. Mr. A. Hornby and party 
of eight persons, Mr. E. L. Heller and family. Mr. F. C. 
Shinn, wife and family, Mrs. E. J. Childs and the Misses 
Childs, Miss Chamberlain, Miss Casserly, Mr. and MYs. F. 
J. Carolan and family, Mrs. A. L. Tubbs, Mr. A. S. Tubbs 
and wife, Mr. J. A. Folger, wife and family, Mr. M. I. Grin- 
baum and wife, Mrs. L. Catherwood La Montague and son. 
Mr. E. L. Taylor and party of six persons, MY. W, A. Good- 
man and wife. The following will arrive August 10th: Mr. 
and Mrs. Harrison, Miss Jennie Crocker, Master Templeton 
Crocker, Mr. Hopkins, Mrs. A. M. Easton, Mr. Perry Eyre 
wife and family, Mrs. J. A. Wbittell and family. 

The following are among those registered at Byron Hot 
Springs during the week: The Misses Oxnard, MY. and Mrs. 
John Landers, Mr. John Rush Baird, -and Mr. W. E. Marsh 
of New York City. 

Mr. Winfield Scott, one of the editors of the Los Angeles 
Herald, was in San Francisco during the week. 

The following guests are registered at the Hotel Rafael: 
Messrs. F. W. Stephenson. R. L. Stephenson, P. L. King, 
Mrs. Grant Selfridge, Mr. P. I. Manson, Mr. and Mrs. H. L. 
Van Wick, Mrs. John Hunt, MY. F. W. Tallant, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. A. Long, Mr. and Mrs. B. G. White, Mrs. Arnold, Mr. Jul- 
ien Harte, Mrs. H. Lewis, Miss Florence Lewis. 

Among the many recent arrivals the past week at High- 
land Springs are: Mr. K. Schmidt and wife, Mr. T. C. Arnold 
and wife, Maud Arnold, Miss G. H. Delzella, MY. W. G. Hol- 
ling, Mr. T. Ellis, Miss L. Ellis, Col. A. Andrews, Mr. Alfred 
L. Weil, Miss B. Arthur, Mr. Cleve Shaffer, Mr. William 
Finnigan, Mr. P. H. Fleming and wife, Mr. J. J. Sheridan 
and wife, Miss May Finnigan, Miss Etta Filmer, Miss May 
Filmer, Miss M. Lundy, MY. T. Lundy, Miss A. Lundy, Mr. 
E. E. George, wife and two children, Mr. J. R. Meyer, Mr. 
A. Poppie, Mr. John Simonds, Mr. Cloe Hanson, MY. Joseph 
O'Hara, Mr. W. A. Linforth and wife, Mr. Paul Linforth, Mr. 
L. Van Vleet, Mr. M. L. Witton, Mr. W. Davis and wife. 
Mrs. L. D. Foster and son, Mr. J. H. Seller, Miss Estelle 
Seller, Miss Florence Seller, Dr. Alfred Eichler, Mr. H. Ho- 

NOT NECESSARY TO GO ELSEWHERE! 



Sherman, Clay & Co. 




PRESIDENT 
SUSPENDERS 

Krr right «i I bo rr"M I,, «> 

Mi. , or. rlgUl ,il Ihv In,, L. 

Ibrt-fflt Ing in InclplQ 
< I tbo '!'-- ftldcnt" maki 

K In r. ] I - i 1 1 " /'■ . ■ 

tdi iif" i-- on bach li & Trim- 
ming! caonol i ii.i. Sold 
oi • iyw hero 60e, or by mall. 

< . \. EDO \ It ion til i.. CO- 
It. .. '.'II It. Phlrler. M 



man. Mr. K. J. O'Oea, Mr. W. H. Hood, wife and son. Mrs. 
.1. E. Hopkins, Kathryn Daly, Doris Daly. Mrs. Ida E. Neal. 
Mr. George H. E. Neal, Mr. H. Ardley, Dr. E. H. Woolsey, 

Mrs. H. Letter, Mis. H. Aliramson, Mr. and Mrs. .1. F. 
Cavagnaro and three children. Mr. T. B. Bond, MY. G. W. 
Myers, Mr. J. E. Peterson, Mrs. H. Palmer, Mrs. F. H. Day- 
wait. Miss Bessie Daywalt. 

The guests at Laurel Dell Hotel are enjoying vaudeville — 
something not usually witnessed at a summer resort. The 
management has secured for the entire season the services 
of the Ford Concert and Vaudeville Co. consisting of ten peo- 
ple, all artists in their line. So the guests are treated to 
the very newest and best in music and songs, an advantage 
they seem to fully appreciate. 

H. H. Kipp, U. S. M. C, and David Potter, U. S. A., are 
among the guests registered at the Occidental Hotel this 
week. 



All fruits and vegetables are at Omey & Goetting's, 

stalls 33-34-45-46 California Market, a little sooner, a little 
better and a little fresher than at other places. 



"Jesse Moore" Whisky lias been the Kentucky standard 

with which all others have been compared since 1851. It Is the 
best. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



CRAIG BROS.: 120 Sutter Street, San Francisco. 

IMPORTERS OF 

Scotch Tweeds 

AND FINE WOOLENS 

Suits $30 and up, Telephone Davis, 910 

I0SEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS, Mfc™i?9s AT 

"GRAND PRIX" PARIS. 1900. THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 

AWARD. These pens are ' the best In the world." 

Sole agent for the United Sta es. 

Mb, Henry Hoe, 91John Street New York. 

Sold by all stationers. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 
Virginia and Gold Hill Water Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the Virginia and Gold Hilt Water Com- 
pany will be held at the office of the company, Room Si, Nevada Block, 
Han Francisco, California, on THURSDAY, the thirty-first day of July, 
1902, at the hour of 11 o'clock a. in., for the purpose of electing a 
Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of 
such other business as may oome before the meeting. 

Transfer books will close on July 21, 1902. at the hour of 3 o'clock p. m. 

D. C. BATES, Secretary. 

San Francisco, July 19, 1902. 



PERALTA HALL 



School for boys. Berkeley, Cal 
term opens July 28th. 

Phone Mason 1387. 
FRANCIS DUNN, Principal 



Next 



Are Chief Purveyors of Everything Musical 

from Steinway Pianos to Ragtime Ditties. 



HMD'S 



Business College 

24 POST STREET 
Illustrated Catalogue Free 



30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 



Campaign Echoes 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



The events of the past week have demonstrated that the 
News Letter was right when it predicted that Mayor 
Schmitz would not be a candidate tor Governor on a Union 
Labor ticket, and that he would not openly seek the Re- 
publican nomination for the office unless such a condition 
of confusion and dead-lock should arise in the Republican 
Convention as might make him a natural and logical com- 
promise candidate. There was for some time a good deal 
of talk of the Mayor, with his Union Labor following, 
breaking into the Republican primaries, behind the Primary 
League, with the double view of building up that organi- 
zation and securing the city delegation for himself. We 
took no stock in that theory because we knew that the 
more prominent and influential labor leaders and their sym- 
pathizers felt that they were under deep obligations to 
Governor Gage, and that if they could not help his candi- 
dacy, they would not countenance any course that was 
calculated to injure it. The action of the Union Labor party 
upon last Thursday night, in reuniting its factions and re- 
solving to place a full local ticket — for Judges. Congress- 
men and members of the legislature — in the field, while 
abstaining from any attempt to enter the broader arena 
of State politics or name candidates for State offices shows 
that we measured the situation correctly. That Mr. Reuff 
hoped for Labor Union help is probable, and that his influ- 
ence with Mayor Schmitz might have been sufficient to 
draw that gentleman into the scheme, is possible. But the 
labor unions and their leaders would not tolerate this. 
Indeed they have been growing very restive for some months 
past over the position of subserviency to the Primary 
League, which seemed to have been assigned to them, and 
the action of Thursday night last is the result. If they are 
going to do politics, they will act for themselves rather 
than pull other people's chestnuts out of the fire. 
* * • 

The effect of this action upon the part of the Union 
Labor leaders is rather complicated in so far as it relates 
to the struggle for the Gubernatorial nomination on the Re- 
publican ticket. It will deprive Governor Gage of some votes 
at the primaries (though he will get these on election day, 
if he is nominated) but it will deprive a professedly Re- 
publican organization upon which he could not depend of 
far more votes. Upon the whole it would seem as though 
the action of the Union Labor leaders is a distinct advantage 
to Governor Gage. It has barred out Mayor Schmitz as 
a possible rival. Besides that, it must be borne in mind 
that any labor vote that is cast with the Republican party 
at the primaries will go to the friends of Governor Gage, 
and in a straight struggle within the party ranks the Gov- 
ernor has little to fear. He is a popular man with the 
people, and still more popular with the party workers. He 
is unpopular only in a few newspaper offices from which ue 
refused to accept dictation, and with a few sore-heads to 
whom a sense of duty compelled him to refuse appointments 
and other favors. 

At the present moment there is no absolute certainty in 
regard to the struggle for the Gubernatorial nomination 
upon the Republican ticket, but there is a sufficient view 
of the situation in sight to enable an unprejudiced observer 
to form a reasonably accurate conjecture. Everything may 
be said to depend upon the outcome of the primaries in 
the larger cities, but the outlook is distinctly in favor of 
Governor Gage. The violent attacks which have been made 
upon his personal and political character do not seem 
to have hurt him. That much can be readily ascertained 
by anyone who circulates around among the people. Of all 
the charges which have been brought against him the only 
one which has made the slightest impression upon the pub- 
lic is that arising out of the substitution of Dr. Lawler for 
Dr. Osborne in the Superintendency of the Glen Ellen Home; 



The very center of the city, convenient to all the 
big stores and all places of amusement. Euro- 
pean plan, $1 a day and upwards. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square Park.) 
Finest cafe In this city. 



Milton RoDlee. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 

A Hitrh Class Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate rates- 
Accessibly and Delightfully located. 
W. Johnson Qoinn, Proprietor. 




RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C, 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 



of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. 
O. G. Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Everydellcalessen 

Domestic and Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



'I've prescribed 
enough . . 



Bethesda 



to swim In.' 



— Db. Sbbadv, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 
Send for Pamphlet. 418 Sacramento St 



Worthington Ames 



flember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In stocks, bonds and municipal securities. 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street. Tel. Main 1381. 



Gray Bros. 



Hay ward Bids:.. California and Montgomery 

streets. San Francisco. 

205 New High Street, Los Angeles 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



From the 

. /"V/^l Warn eat to 

dtoHttst the cheapest 

^^ (Trades, 1 n 

great variety of patterns. PrlceB to uorreapond with 

Qua'lty. It will pay you to trade with ua. Out-of-town 

orders solicited. O. W. CLARK &• CO., 

3W-30C Poet Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




July 26, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



31 



ALASKA 

Refrigerator ^j 

Is the best con- 
structed ever put 
on this market. 
The Alaska will 
keep provisions 
longer and use less 
ice than any other 
refrigerator. Send 
for catalogue. 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO., 

Importers 




REDUCED 

Genuine 

Wellington 

Coal 



FOR SALE BY ALL RELIABLE DEALERS 

$10.00 per ton 





BEFORE leaving the 




city for your summer 




vacation you had bet- 


A 


ter store your value 




ables in the Vaults of 


Wise 


the 


Precaution 


CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT 




AND TRUST COMPANY 




Cor, Oalifornla&Monteomery st. 




San Fbancisco 



and In l.nt matter ba i« n< i as havInK ilon' 

thlni worse than make ■ mistake In general, his adn 
(ration is regarded t>> the public u^. bavlni 

ad economical, while bis bold Mami at 
tne domination ol newspaper bosses has won him hoi 
Mends, With (hat feeling abroad among the mam 
the people, with the laboring classes particularly friendly 
toward him, with the active workers of his party exerting 
themselves In his behalf, and with a friendly party organi- 
zation in hind him, it is difficult to understand how h 
be beaten, but then politics are foil of surprises. 

* • • » 

The adjournment of Congress brought the California mem- 
bers scurrying back home upon the double quick. Since 
their arrival they have been industriously, but for the most 
part silently, mending their fences, for they are pretty 
much all candidates for re-election. In several districts, 
however, the nominating conventions seem likely to make 
changes and there is a possibility of the voters making a 
change or two. The re-apportionment of the State has intro- 
duced an element of uncertainty as to the political complex- 
ion of a couple of districts, though the chances will favor 
Republicans everywhere this year. In the fifth district it 
looks as though Mr. Loud would have the fight of his life 
to secure a re-nomination. In the fourth district Mr. Kahn 
is reasonably sure of the nomination, but if the Union Labor 
people put up an acceptable candidate who is endorsed by 
the Democracy, he will stand a strong prospect of being 
beaten at the polls. If there are two other candidates in 
the field against him, he will have the best of the situation. 

* * * * 

The date of the primary is little more than two weeks 
off, and still the Democracy gives no sign of life. In this 
city the organization will eventually have things its own way. 
since no one thinks it worth while to dispute its sway. 
But nominations which come out of such an apathetic 
condition are not worth having. Since 1879, when the 
Workingmen's Party forced the Democracy into political 
insolvency, no such spectacle has been presented as now 
greets the eye when one searches for the party which was 
born simultaneously with the Constitution, and which was 
expected to endure as long as American liberty lived. 

* * * * 

The editorial triumvirate is chortling in great glee over 
the fact that there is to be a legal primary held in every 
precinct in Santa Clara county. The editors profess to re- 
gard this as a great victory for their cause. This is a good 
deal like whistling in order to keep up one's courage when 
passing through a grave-yard. Governor Gage has the 
friendship of the political workers of his party, but his main 
strength' is with the general body of the people. At the 
time of the reception to the California regiment the San 
Francisco newspaper trust sought so smother him, but it 
was noticed that all along the line he received ovations that 
were as enthusiastic as those accorded the returning sold- 
iers. And so it has been all through his political career. 
The anti-Gage delegates which have so far been selected 
have all been chosen by the star chamber process. Where 
there has been anything like a popular election — as in Kern 
county — he has been victorious. He has nothing to fear 
from the people. It was his friends in the State Central 
Committee that urged the party to hold legal primaries all 
over the State, and to avoid the appointment of delegates 
as far as possible. 



Eminent Physicians 
are eagerly studying the problems of baby feeding. Bor- 
den's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk is recommended by the 
leading family physicians. It is always safe and reliable. 
Send for book, "Babies," 71 Hudson St., N. Y. 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN T s ££Tt*T e r%t m^t ?£"- 



edy. 
at 32 



Gives health and strength to the sexual organs 
Market St., San Francisco. Send for circular. 



Depot 



Allen's Press Clippinr Bureau have moved to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreets, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



32 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 26, 1902. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due io arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 



lute] 



[Main Line. Foot of Market St.} 
From June 22. 1902 



[arrive 



7:00 A Benlola, Sulsun, Elmlra, and Sacramento 6:55 T 

7:00 a Vacaville, Winters, RumBey 7:55 p 

7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa, Caliatoea, Santa Rosa... 6:25 p 

8:00 A Davis. Woodland, Kniphta Landing, Marysvllle. Orovllle 7:55 p 

8:00 A Atlantic Express. Oerden and East 8:25 A 

8:00 A Niles, Lathrop, Stockton 7:25 p 

8:00a Nlles, Mendota, Hanford. Vlsalia. Porterville- 4:55 P 

8:35 a Shasta Express — Davis. Williams, (for Bartlett Springs). Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland 7:55 p 

8:30 a San Jose. Llvermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento. Placerville. 

Marysvllle. Chico, Red Bluff. 4:25 p 

8:30a Oakdale, Chinese. Sonora. Tuolumne... -. - 4:25P 

8:00 a Vallejo 12:25 r 

9:00 a Los Anireles Express — Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton, 

Merced. Raymond, Fresno, and Los Angeles 8:25 A 

9:30 A Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 p 

10:00 a Hay wards, Niles and way stations « t!2:55 p 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha, Chicago 5:25 p 

tl:00p9aoramento River Steamers f 11:00 P 

8:00 f Benlola. Winters. Sacramento, Woodland, Williams, Willows, 

Knights Landing, Maryville. Orovllle 10:55 A 

3:30 p Haywards. Nlles. and way stations 7:55 p 

4.-00 p Martinez. San Ramon. Vallejo, Napa, Oallstoga, Santa Rosa 9 2 r > a 

4:00 p Nlles. Llvermore. Stookton. Lodl 12:25 p 

4:30p Haywards. Niles. San Jose. Llvermore - t8:55 a 

4:30 p The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tulare, Bakenfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 8.55 A 

5:00 p Port Costa. Tracy, Lathrop, Stookton 10:24 A 

5:00 p Martinez, Antloch, Stookton, Merced, Raymond Fresno 12:2"' P 

t5:30pNlles Local 7:2* a 

«:00 p Haywards. Nlles, and San Jose 7:55 A 

t« O0p Vallejo 11:25 a 

«:00 p Oriental Malt— Ogden, Denver. Omaha, St. Louis, Chicago... 4:2^ p 

7:f0 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez, and way stations 11 2S a 

tTflOp Vallejo 7:55 P 

8:05 p Oregon and California Express — Sacramento, Marysvllle. Red- 
oing. Portland. Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

t9:10 p Hayward and Nlles til :55 a 

Coast Line (Narrow Gauere). (Foot of Market St.) 

$7:45 A Santa Cruz Excursion t«:05 p 

8:15 a Newark. CentervlUe, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:50 p 

t2:15 P Newark, CentervlUe. San Jose, New Almaden, Felton. Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way Btatlons 10:50 a 

4:15p Newark. San Jo«»e, Los Onto* t8:50 a 

&4:15p San Jose. Los Gatos. Santa Cruz C8:50a 



OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 



From San Fhanoisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15. 9:00, and 11 :00 
A. M- 1 :00. 8:00. 5=15. p. m 

From OAK'Airp — Foot of Broadway.— 16:00. t8:00. t8:05, 10:00 A. M. 12:00. 
1:00. 4:00 p.m. 

Coast Ltne (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets.) 

«:10 A San Jose and way stations 5:80 r 

t^:00A San Jose and way stations 7 31) p 

f7-nn a New Almaden ..- fA 11 p 

1 7:15 A Monterey Excursion Js:30 P 

8:00 a Coast Line Limited — San Jose, Gilroy. ITollister. Salinas, San 
Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara. Los Angeles and Principal inter- 
mediate stations 10:45 p 

9:00 a San Jo«e. Tres Plnos. Santa Cruz. Paolflc Grove. Salinas. San 

Luis Obispo, and principal Intermediate stations .. 4:10 p 

10:80 A San Jose and way stations 8:36 A 

11-S0 A San Jose. Los Gatos and wav stations 5:30 p 

fll:30p Sun Jose and way stations "7:00 p 

t2;01 p San Jose and way stations - yft ;i"if> a 

•3 00 pDel Monte Express— Only stops San Jose 1 12:01 p 

3 30 P Han Mateo. Redwood. Palo Alio. Santa Clara. San Jose. Tres 
Plnos, Santa Cruz. Salinas, Del Monte. Monterey, and Pacttle 

Grove 10:45a 

4 :30 p San Jose and principal way stations ... i ;30 p 

t5:00 p San Jose. Los Gatos, and principal way stations 9 nn a 

R:80 p San Jose and principal wty stations 10 01a 

t6:15 P San Mateo. Belmont. Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto t6:46 a 

6:30 p San Jose and way stations 6:3* A 

7:00p New Orleans Express — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barhpra, T,os 

Angeles. Doming. El Paso. New Orleans, and East..- 10:15 a 

nll:15 P Palo Alto and wny stations .'. +9:45 p 

alt:45 p San Jose and way stations _ J9:15 p 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. f Sundays excepted- 

t Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

^Saturday and Sunday only. cMonday only. 

"Daily except Saturday. 

The Union Tkansfkb Oompant will sail for and eheok baggage from 
hotels and residences. Telephone. Exchange 83. Enquire of Ticket Agents 
for Time Cards' and other Information. ^^ 

Chicago 'n less than 3 Days 



FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



AT 10 A. M. 



CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Doable Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars, Buffet, Smoking and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Cars — meals a la carte. Daily 
Tourist Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Franciaco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 

R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

6J7 Market St. Palace Hotel, San Francisco 



CAL. N. W. RY. CO., Le "« e » S. F. «* N. P. RY. CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tnroaoi. riaav - Foot of M.rket Siren 

S3SV?AT^rK' 9:00 i M :0 °, "■"• : J 2 * 5 ' 3J>0 - 5:10 ' 6:S0 '■"■ Thursday.- 
5rrrjr,T^S a '.'i?. l?i , Saturdays-Extra trips at 1 SO and 11 »u. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 9:80, 11:00 A.M.; 1:30. 3:80. 5:00. 6:20 P.M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 

sSw-ifjis^sys u:w '■"■■ i2M - 3to - 5:is -* «■"»**- 

SUNDAY8-8:10.9:40 11:10 a.m., 1:40.8:40 5:05. 6:36 p.h. 

Between Sa n Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same sohedule as abova. 

Leave San Franolsca | In Effect Apr. 28. 1901 | Arrlveat San Pranol.oo 

Sundays I Week days 
10:40 ah I 8:40 ah 
6:05 Pm lo:-^5 ah 
7:35 Pm I 6:20 rn 

10:40 AM I 1035 AH 

I 6:20 ph 




Pacific Coast Steamship Co Htea «>« r " i™>-,. ««„ i-,,,,,- 

» « r ww. C isco as follows: 



^ 



Cisco as follows: 

Por Ketchikan. Juneau, Treadwell's, Douglns City. 

Skaguay. etc., Alaska, 11 A.M. : July 5. 10, 15. 20. 25. 30: Aug. 

4. Chance to company's steamers at Seattle. 

5. w°kf6.&.^V e T t 9ound r^- U * "■ Ju "- 

Por Eureka (Humboldt Bay), 1:30 r. H July 1 6 11 
16, 21,26. 31; Aug. 5. " ' 

' 1 r° r . ^ A n«>«» (via Port Los Angeles and Redondo), 
«... ,£„. ""? Janta Barbara. ■• Santa Rosa." Sundays. 9 a. h. 
State of California, Thursdays: 9 a. m. 

For Los Angeles, via San Pedro and East San Pedro. Santa Barbara, 
Santa Cruz, Monterey. San Simeon. Cayucoe, Port Harford (San Luis 
Obispo) Ventura. Hueneme. and 'Newport. ('Corona only ) 

Corona, 9a. in.. July 5.13.31.29.: Auc. 6. 

Coos Bay. 9 a. m., July 1. 9, 17, 25; Aug. 2. 

For Mexican Ports, 10 a.m., 7th of each month. 

For further Information obtain folder. 

RlBrht Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel) 
QOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agts. 
C. D. DtJNANN. Gen. Passenger Agent. 

to Market St.. San Franclsoo. 




S3* Alameda." for Honolulu. Sat. Aug. 2, 2 p m 
SS "sierra, " for Australia. Thurs Aug. H, 10a. m 
S3 Mariposa." for Tahiti, TueB , A lie. 20. 10 a. m. 
1 lue to Ooolgardle. Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS A BROS. CO, 
Agents, 643 Market Street. Freight Office. 327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 



The Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 

Incorporated Under Royal Charter 1840. 
— and— 

Compania Sud-Americana De-Vapores 

First-Class Twin Screw Passenger Steamers 

From SAN FRANCISCO fo Mexico. Central America, Panama, Guayaaull 

Callao. Valparaiso, and all Ports on the East and Wesl 

Coast of South America. 

Sailing from Howard 3, Pier 10, 12 M. 
£ KBtJ July 30, 1902 

UUATKMAI.A August 8. 1902 

COLOMBIA AutJUStlS, 1*2 



These steamers are built expressly for Central and South American pas- 
senger service. (No change at Panama.) Freight and passenser office, 316 
California Street. 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., General Agents. 




Illinois Central 
Railroad 



EFFICIENTLY SERVES 
A VAST TERRITORY 



DIRECT CONNECTION WITH 

OVERLAND LIMITED at Omaha for Chicago and points East- 

wilh SUNSET LIMITED at New Orleans for Louiivillc, 

Cincinnati and points East. 

FOUR PERSONALLY CONDUCTED EXCURSIONS WEEKLY 



H. SNEDAKER, GENERAL AGENT 
648 Market St., San Franclsoo, Oal. 





Mrs. Chas. C. Moore in her locomobile touring car, at San Mateo. 

(With S. F. News Letter, August 2, 1902.) 



Price, 10c per copy. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1869. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




(£alif o x n unS^Jboerti sjer. 




Vol. LXV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST 2, 1902. 



Number 5. 



The San Francisco NEWS LETTER If* printed and Published every Satur- 
day by the proprietor, Frederick Marriott, Halieck building, 33? Saiisuine 
street. San Francisco, t'al 

Ratlered at San Francisco Posloffleo as second-class matter. 

New York office — r where information may be obtained regarding subscrip- 
tlonfl and adv. rti-dnc 3*r> Broadway, C. 0. Murphy epreseniativc 

London office — 30 C'ornhlll, E. C. England. George Street A: Co. representa- 
tive. 

Boston— 36 Bloomfleld street. W. H. Patreett representative. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter. Intended for 
pub ication in the current number of the NEAVS LETTER should bo sent 
to this oflice not later than & p. m. Thursday previous to day of issue. 

We may have peace afte.- all in the Philippines if the 
cholera continues. 



The Missouri man who killed his former sweetheart and 
himself because she wouldn't marry him, would have done 
the world a greater service by committing suicide first 
instead of afterward. 



The Mexican war mule which has been pensioned by the 
Government certainly can't kick. 



Although Generals DeWet, Botha and Delarey are being 
lionized in Cape Town, they are not being British-lionized. 



During the earthquake season, there is general thanks- 
giving here that Santa Barbara is so far away. 



Robert Fitzsimmons is to tour the country, but whether 
on the stage or the lecture platform is not yet made clear. 



It looks now as though Marconi had not only stolen Mar- 
quis Solari's thunder, but that he had stolen his lightning 
as well. 



Of the Washington Chinese who hanged himself with a 
shoestring, it may be truly said that his life hung by a 
thread. 



It must gall "Sir" Harry Westwood Cooper to be on trial 
for forgery and receive as little notoriety as the papers are 
giving him. 



Before sending teachers to civilize the inhabitants of 
Luzon, we might dispatch a commission to Christianize the 
inhabitants of M'odoc county. 



The long-standing fight in the ranks of the Carpenter's 
Union is at an end, and the carpenters are now knocking 
nails instead of each other. 



Lieutenant de Clairmont, who tells the story of the 
white race in the Philippines, may be all right, but it would 
be interesting to know what brand he smokes. 



Down in West Virginia a mob in search of a negro mur- 
derer killed only three blacks before getting the right man. 
Lynching down there is likely to die out for want of ex- 
citing features. 



Washington geologists swear that the eruption of Mt. 
Pelee has caused an elevation along the Eastern coast 
of this country. The smaller the elevation the better we 
will all like it. 



William Nixon, who impersonated Tracey in Seattle and 
had the life nearly beaten out of him by an excited mob, 
will probably employ his time in the hospital in envying 
the real outlaw. 



If the anti-imperialist protest against cruelties in the 
Philippines had been sent to President Roosevelt by other 
than campaign boomers, the paper would have carried more 
weight and done more good. 



Robert Jones, of Pleasanton, imagined that evil influences 
were following him. His imagination landed him in the 
insane asylum — but his present position proved that he 
was right about the evil influences. 



It is recorded that the Teetotalers of America met in con- 
clave in New Jersey and that Mrs. Carrie Nation was not 
among those present. She has been so often intoxicated 
with fanaticism that the Teetotalers have probably black- 
balled her. 



A regimental hangman, who made a record by suspending 
Filipinos by the dozen, is now in the insane ward of the 
Presidio hospital. If the army were consistent, his record 
would be appreciated and he would be given a Major-Gen- 
eral's commission. 



Although the projected trip to this country of Prince and 
Princess Rospigliosi is looked forward to, the mere fact 
of the existence of a Princess Rospigliosi will make the 
Prince's advent a somewhat tame affair for American 
society. 



The story of a mammoth pre-historic ship found in the 
ice-floes of the north, has proven, like most of the mastodon 
stories, an Eskimo fake. Although mastodons and big 
ships don't grow in the north, the Alaskan imagination is 
fully as large as it is reputed to be. 



The fact that Mr. Rockefeller's new. crop of hair Is very 
thin and soft and white, does not indicate that he is in his 
second childhood. It would not be surprising if the doctor 
who forced this magic growth should advertise himself 
"Special Hairologist to Mr. John D. Rockefeller." 



It is said that the Macedonian committee is soon to reveal 
the real motive behind Miss Stone's kidnapping. This is 
not necessary. The lucrative magazine articles and lec- 
ture engagements of Miss Stone have taught us that to fall 
among thieves is a worthy object in Itself. 



Congressman Sutherland of Utah ohjected to his daugh- 
ter's marrying Mr. Charles W. Lawrence, so the young cou- 
ple skipped to San Francisco and were wed. This Is the 
first case on record where anybody in Utah has objected 
to anybody's marrying anybody as often as necessity or 
fancy dictated. 



They are having riots in Paris because some schools were 
closed. If they hadn't been closed there would have been 
riots anyway, and if there had been no schools to be closed 
or remain unclosed, there would still have been riots. Pa- 
risians are bound to raise a periodical racket, and no ex- 
cuse is as good as any excuse. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 



THE DEGENERATION OF THE PRIZE RING. 

The "great" Fitzsimmons-Jeffries fight is over, and the 
roar of "take! fake!" has followed as surely as the clap 
of thunder follows the lightning flash. The Examiner emp- 
ties its broadsides because the "public" has been "swindled" 
and Mayor Schmitz in righteous indignation raises his 
hands aloft and declares that there shall be no more fakes 
in San Francisco. Mayor Schmitz — innocent child — never 
hints that prize fights should never have been permitted 
in the first place, but that his public, his darling union pub- 
lic, should pay their eight-hour wage and be cheated of their 
blood-letting, this is too much for the good Mayor's patience. 
If Mayor Schmitz enforces his anti-fake rule he will practi- 
cally prohibit prize-fighting in San Francisco, for pretty 
much all prize-fights are fakes nowadays. In short, pugi- 
lism is declining by that same means whereby our old friend 
the Roman Republic fell — through its own rottenness. This 
comparison may seem odious, but 'tis true, 'tis lucky, and 
lucky 'tis, 'tis true. Pugilism is killing itself by means 
of that same moral poison that has so long sustained it. 
You cannot expect "purity" in the class of sport which re- 
duces men to several degrees lower than the bull dog. 
Prize fighting at its best is a means of getting money 
through illegitimate sources, and it is an easy matter for 
promotors to step from fair fights to unfair fights. The 
managers have argued, with a certain amount of reason on 
their side, that the class of people who pay money to see 
men maimed and battered ought to be cheated if they are 
not. The patrons of prize-fighting are. in a way, parties to 
a crime, and it is a diminished offense to rob a criminal. 
The "easy public" is, however, getting tired of this sort of 
thing. Such of them as consent to pay their money pay it 
with reluctance. Their suspicions are aroused, and they are 
ever on the alert to cry "fake." In this way the popularity 
of the sport is, fortunately, declining. With every spurious 
exhibition interest wanes, and it is only a matter of a few 
years before prize-fighting must go out altogether. The 
half human creatures who style themselves "pugilists" are 
simple beasts, and they have fallen utterly into the hands of 
unscrupulous speculators. If the Jeffries-Fitzsimmons match 
was a bona-fide exhibition it is no less a shame that people 
should have bought expensive tickets in order to see a lusty 
young giant beat and bruise a man who is already stiffened 
and enfeebled by age. Thus the affair was lamentable from 
whatever side it is viewed. It is fortunate that Mayor 
Schmitz's conscience has been awakened, if somewhat late. 



BLOCK THIS EXPERIMENT. 

The News Letter has already drawn the attention of the 
property owners along the route of the Geary street railroad 
and of the tax-payers throughout all parts of the city, to 
the fact that the proposed acquirement and operation of the 
road in question by the city government is not merely an 
experiment, but an experiment which all the signs indicate 
will turn out to be a costly and disastrous failure. The 
truth of this is now admitted by the leading friends of the 
scheme. In an interview with a representative of the 
first paper published on last Sunday, Mr. Samuel Braun- 
hart, Chairman of the Committee of the Board of Super- 
visors, which has charge of this matter, said: 

"I hope that no obstacles will be thrown in the way of 
municipal ownership, for that experiment is very dear to 
my heart — and after all. it is only an experiment. I am no 
obstructionist, and I hope that you will say so as plainly and 
as emphatically as you can. And say also that we are 
trying to avoid lawsuits and extravagance in our effort to 
make a success of this first experiment in municipal owner- 
ship." 

That is clear, distinct, and to the point. The people who 
are advertising this scheme propose to bond the city — or 
in other words, mortgage every dollar's worth of property 



within us confines — for seven or eight hundred thousand dol- 
lars, just as an experiment; the people who are advocating 
this scheme propose to sacrifice the interests of the property 
owners along the route of the line in question, just as an 
experiment. These fellows, indeed, boldly proclaim that 
the interests of the property owners and tax payers should 
not be considered in connection with this matter. One of 
their journalistic advocates recently said: 

"The argument that a number of people in outlying por- 
tions of the city would be benefited by a grant of additional 
franchises * * * should not, from the standpoint of the 
Board of Supervisors, produce any impression whatever 
* * * their claims are insignificant when compared with 
the claims of the large number who will be benefited by 
the construction of a municipal railway on Geary and Mar- 
ket streets." 

That expresses the spirit which animates the people who 
are behind this experimental job. "The large number who 
will be benefited," -according to the preceding excerpt, are 
the politicians, the tax-eaters and the rabble who contrib- 
ute from nothing up to about sixty-two cents a year to the 
public revenues. The solid citizens who pay the taxes and 
whose property will be mortgaged by the bonds issued on 
behalf of the "experiment" do not count. Surely it is time 
for these citizens to get together and make arrangements 
for the frustration of this costly "experiment" with their 
money. And it should be borne in mind in this connection 
that while municipal ownership is an experiment with us. 
it is a demonstrated failure in other American cities where 
it has been attempted. Upon this point we published a 
ghastly array of facts and figures last week. Even the 
English cities of Manchester and Birmingham — where the 
conditions are much more favorable to municipal owner- 
ship than they are in this country — have been obliged to 
lease their street railroads to private corporations. Is there 
anything in our methods of municipal administration to en- 
courage the hope that different results will be achieved 
here? Let our experience in erecting the City Hall and the 
Hall of Justice answer: let our experience in operating the 
County Clerk's office, the Tax Collector's office, the Asses- 
sor's office, and the street department, answer. And when 
the answer is carefully studied it will be seen that the Geary 
street "experiment" is simply a scheme to break into the 
public treasury. 



THE SALARIES OF AMBASSADORS. 
The removal by death of the late Lord Pauncefote. Brit- 
ish Ambassador to Washington, has opened the eyes of the 
Imperial Ministry to the fact that the map of the world 
has changed considerably since George the Third was King 
and their grandfathers wore powdered perukes and short 
clothes. At that time Paris was the diplomatic center of the 
world, and the British Embassy there was the highest- 
salaried post on the list of the Foreign Office, the pay 
amounting to £9.000 per annum. America, during the same 
period, was looked upon somewhat in the light of a naughty 
child, and the Embassy at Washington ranked just above 
Madrid, the least important in the list of old world capi- 
tals, the Ambassador receiving only £6,500 per annum. Now 
it has been discovered that Paris has given way to Wash- 
ington in political importance. So far as Great Britain is 
concerned, and one of the first steps of the new ministry 
will be to put the American capital at the head of the list 
of Embassies. This involves parliamentary proceedings, 
followed by the selection of a man of affairs worthy the 
honor of the highest and most important foreign post In 
the diplomatic service. The rating of the several embassies 
and salaries attached on the list of the British Foreign 
Office is as follows: Paris, £9,000; Berlin, £8,000; Constan- 
tinople. £8.000: Vienna, £8.000; St. Petersburg. £7,800; 
Rome, £7.000; Washington, £6,500, and Madrid somewhere 
about £6,000. 



Auguft 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A SEARCH FOR A BRIDE. 

There it seldom nui. h romance In Uio mating of I 
»nd Alfonso XIII is to be no exoaptioD to tbe rule, i 

n. and with a weak constitution, ho Is already hunting 
> bride by proxy. The Pope has been called upon b 
yin-.-n IViwager to suggest an eligible wife for Ihi 
monarch, and no doubt hU choice will be accepted at H 
The flclii f lingly llmilcd. Princesses 

of the Roman Catholic faith, belonging to royal hou 
sufficient dignity to prevent the marriage from being a dip- 
lomatic misalliance, are not numerous in Europe. The 
royal suitor can only look toward Munich or Vienna and 
the Bourbon blood already weakened by generations of in- 
termarriage will be further vitiated by intermixture with the 
nearly related strains of Austria and Bavaria. If common 
sense ruled in the matter, Alfonso would seek his bride 
among the highest types of womanhood that the world con- 
tains, and they are to be found in America. A good strap- 
ping Western girl might set the Bourbon dynasty on its 
feet again. No doubt there are many such, who, for the 
sake of being called a queen, would marry even such a weak- 
ting as is the King of Spain. But there is no salvation in 
store for the dynasty in that way. Despite the teachings 
of science, as well as of common observation, Bourbon inter- 
marriages will go on until the race perishes from the face 
of the earth. The case of Alfonso is a new proof that tne 
rules of royalty hold within themselves the disease of 
which royal houses die, and by reason of which monar- 
chy sooner or later must come to an end. The intermar- 
riages of other royal families have been altogether too fre- 
quent, and must increase unless the laws are changed. 
The future King of England is married to a first cousin. 
Better he had been turned loose in this country to capture 
an American cousin, and thereby draw closer the bonds 
of union between the two countries. He certainly would 
have had no trouble in finding a bride. 



RUSSIA AND JAPAN PREPARING FOR WAR. 
The stories are so rife in official circles in the Orient and 
even in the chancellories of Europe that Japan and Russia 
are preparing for war that there must surely be something 
in them. What is known, to the outside world goes far to 
render these predictions very possibly true. Japan was 
robbed by Russia of the fruits of her victory over China, 
and has rankled ever since with a sense of injustice at the 
treatment she then experienced. She made no secret at 
the time that she would live to recover the provinces of 
which she had been deprived. She was not ready to fight for 
them, but said she would get ready. It was not known 
how she intended to proceed, and her threat was hardly 
taken seriously by the outside world. It seemed unthinkable 
that the little brown man, who only became a part of a 
nation of forty-five millions of people, unaccustomed to 
modern warfare the other day, could have any possible 
chance in a conflict with a mighty power like Russia. But 
a great many things have happened since then. Japan at 
once bent all her energies to the strengthening of her posi- 
tion. Every dime of the $200,000,000 indemnity she collected 
from China has been spent for that purpose. In addition, 
she has incurred a large national debt for warlike purposes, 
and is taxing her people all they can bear. She has built 
a greater navy than Russia can possibly bring against 
her in the Pacific. She has raised an army of 600,000 well- 
equipped and thoroughly-disciplined soldiers. She has for- 
tified her harbors so well as to render her about as impreg- 
nable as is old England. Moreover, she has obtained a 
treaty of alliance with Great Britain by which that country 
is bound to come to her assistance in case Russia gains an 
ally. Russia and Japan have got to fight it out alone, with 
China probably assisting Japan, or the long-expected Euro- 
pean war will soon be on. That Uncle Sam will be able 



to keep out of it Is not no certain as It would at one time 
have a p pea r ed. BnglUd is doing her best to curtail the 
area of possible war. and the chancel are that she will 
succeed. The Dricbund Is with her. and neither I'i:m 
Russia wants a fight with her just now. In an encounter 
with Japan. Russia would be too far from her base of sup 
piles to be effective, whereas the field of warfare would be 
where Japan Is at her best. 



CHOLERA IN THE PHILIPPINES. 

The wretched Filipinos seem foredoomed to trouble. No 
sooner have American physicians and sanitariums stamped 
out small-pox and the bubonic plague than a most virulent 
type of cholera breaks out among them. During the first 
few days of the appearance of the disease, as many as ninety 
American soldiers died of it, and tne virulence has gone on 
increasing, rather than decreasing, since then. Cholera, un- 
like the bubonic plague, does not yield to cleanliness. Daily 
baths and filtering of drinking water have little or no effect 
upon it. bcience does not appear as yet to have mastered 
the disease, and although some degree of amelioration is 
possible, there is little left to do but to let it run its course. 
That is rough on our brave soldiers, who are at present in 
the teeming and untidy Orient. It may be that we should 
have left the Filipinos to their plagues and pests, and saved 
the lives of our brave boys by keeping them at home. But 
regrets are useless at this late date. Our soldiers are there 
now, and many of them will have to remain. It would be 
comforting to our people to know that everything possible 
is being done for their comfort. The American people have 
been unable to escape their share of the white man's bur- 
den and are willing to make great sacrifices that good may 
come to the world. At the same time, every precaution 
should be used to prevent the disease landing at one of our 
h,ome ports. It would hardly live in a patient's body for 
the thirty days that it takes to make the voyage, but the 
germs of it have been known to be carried long distances 
in old clothes, etc. No ship from Manila, either with or 
without a clean bill of health, should be allowed to enter 
the port without a thorough fumigation. * * * But we are 
treading upon dangerous ground. We shall have the Mayor 
and the new Board of Health that is to be down upon us if 
we attempt to protect the city. 



FRANCHISES IN OUR NEW POSSESSIONS. 

It is significant of what is in President Roosevelt's mind 
that among the provisions of the act for the government of 
the Philippines, are clauses requiring that all franchises 
granted to public service corporations shall provide for the 
effective regulation of charges for official inspection and 
regulation of the books and accounts of the grantee, and the 
payment of a reasonable percentage of gross earnings into 
the treasury of the district in which the franchise is exer- 
cised. The law in question was introduced, with the appro- 
val of the administration, by Senator Lodge, and is under- 
stood to have the warm support of President Roosevelt. 
It is in accordance with his public utterances. He has more 
than once declared that before Trusts can be regulated more 
must be known of their actual operations. He has advo- 
cated official inspection of their accounts with the funest 
publicity. He has, in the case of the Philippines, gone a 
step further, and provided that a portion of the gross earn- 
ings of all public service corporations shall be paid into 
the treasury. As an indication of the President's intentions 
in dealing with public utilities this action is very significant. 
He evidently does not believe in public ownership, but does 
believe that the granting of valuable franchises should be 
for value received or to be received. It is a clear-cut and 
understandable policy. Whether it will solve the existing 
problem remains to be seen, but the plan seems practical 
and feasible. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 



Reminiscences No. 19 



By an Old Newspaper Man. 

Stock gambling was, from the dis- 
Some Stock Deals covery of the Comstock lode up to 
of the Past. the early eighties, the chief excite- 

ment of life in California. All classes 
and conditions of men, aye, and of women, too, engaged in 
it. The business was ordinarily a gambling proposition 
pure and simple, in which the inside managers held all the 
cards. The outside public did not know and had no means 
of learning whether they were merely investing in "a hole 
in the ground," or in a mine that held out fair prospects 
of success. The operations carried on in the neighborhood 
of Virginia City, Nevada, were in deep ground, access to 
the lowest levels was denied to the investing public, and 
the managers were the purveyors of about all the news 
that was allowed to reach the outside world. It resulted 
that most of the news was manufactured in the interests 
of the managers, and was rarely based on solid fact. The 
outside gambling public rushed hither and thither in search 
of "pointers" or hints as to the whereabouts of coming 
bonanzas, and of course no pains were spared to excite 
their cupidity and to send them rushing to the stock boards 
to "get in," as the phrase of the time had it, "on the 
ground floor." If a mine gave signs of "petering out," 
as was often the case, the insiders sent their clacquers 
around to tell of the wonderful ore body that was opening 
up. The stock at once went bounding skywards, thousands 
of shares were sold in a day, and when the bubble burst, 
the insiders were without a share, whilst the public were 
"loaded up." One would think that this sort of trick might 
work once or twice, but that it would soon be "played out." 
But such was not the fact. As long as ore bodies were en- 
countered, men threw their caution to the winds, and took' 
"a flyer" as a mere gamble. Aye! but they were merry 
days those! There was money around in every man's 
pocket, or if there were a few exceptions, any honest fel- 
low could get "a raise" for the asking for it. Men were 
often "dead broke" one week and rich the next. In those 
buoyant times the man on the street never said die, and if 
knocked down to-day was up again to-morrow, and God 
alone could tell where he would land before he was through 
with his latest deal. And so things came and went. "Come 
easy, go easy" is an old adage that was singularly true of 
that period. 

We have seen how easy it was 
The Discovery of the to inflate the stock of a played- 
Bonanza Kept Secret, out mine, and unload it upon a 

public that had no means of 
knowing the inside facts. It was equally easy to depress 
the shares of a mine that had rich ore ahead. Clap on 
heavy assessments, declare that there is "nothing in sight," 
and insist that money is wanted for more extended ex- 
plorations, and forthwith anybody coulu get the stock by 
merely paying the assessment. Of course, the insiders "took 
it in," and when they got ready, "showed up" the bonanza 
of whose existence they had known all the while. That 
this was downright cheating goes as a matter of course, 
but then few mine operators were "square" dealers to an 
excited crowd that wanted to gamble, whether it won or 
lost. If men would "buck" against the diamond drill in 
the hands of managers who had access to the drifts day 
and night, they had themselves to blame for offering a pre- 
mium on deception. The Bonanza firm did not show up 
what it had come upon in Con.-Virginia for some months 
after the event. Meanwhile they quietly bought up the out- 
standing stock, and put bores and drifts into the body 
of ore they had discovered, in order to ascertain its limita- 
tions and extent. By the time they had the stock all in, 



they knew almost to a fraction what the whole bonanza 
would yield, and what the stock was really worth. The 
dealing in it was no longer a gamble on their part, because 
it had become a certainty. But of this the public knew 
nothing, and lost its head when the ore production began 
to amount to $10,000,000 a month, and it was given out that 
this would last for a generation to come. The stock of 
Con.-Virginia only four months before dividends ceased, 
sold at the rate of double the amount of bullion that was 
taken out of the mine from first to last, a fact which 
shows the extent of the ignorance of the investing public. 
Had there been, as there is in most countries, a system 
of Government or State inspection, this could not have 
been. 

All bubbles have a short life; al- 
The Bubble Pricked beit, it may be a rapid one. The 
at Last. bonanza was not a bubble by any 

means, but "the deal" which sus- 
tained its price on the market so long undoubtedly was. 
It was given to the redoubtable bear, James R. Keene, to 
explode the inflated deal. His practised eye detected that 
stock was coming on the market that had never been there 
before, and he shrewdly calculated that it could only come 
from the Bonanza firm. He spent money to get experts into 
the mine, and was rewarded with a sure and certain in- 
formation that the ore body was well-nigh exhausted. In- 
finite were the pains he promptly took to guard himself 
against deception on that point. Suddenly, one afternoon, 
just before the adjournment of the board, he jumped into 
the arena, and sold Con.-Virginia and California short, at 
whatever prices he could get. His fellow brokers were 
amazed. They could not believe that the "break" was 
genuine, or that it would last. They thought that Mr. 
Keene was simply resorting to a well-known broker's trick 
to break the stock down in order to take it in through other 
brokers at lower rates. Anyhow, the excitement was in- 
tense. The brokers and the street were loaded up with 
the stock. At the hour of adjournment Mr. Keene was still 
in the ring, and remained so as long as there were any 
buyers, and then announced that he would be there bright 
and early in the morning, ready to supply all comers. Few 
brokers, and not many of their customers, went to bed that 
night. The Bonanza firm remained in town and took coun- 
sel together and with their brokers.' Mr. Keene was on hand 
as bright as a daisy and as full of music as a lark. The 
Bonanza brokers were there, too, and with instructions to 
sustain the stock. In less than twenty minutes Mr. Keene 
had let them have over 30,000 shares, and still offered more. 
In fact, he said he would sell them the whole, or any part 
of the mine at lower figures than had yet been offered. In 
the evening Mr. Flood came out in a two-column interview 
which appeared in the Daily Evening Stock Report, saying 
that Con.-Virginia and California were worth three times 



^k 




(Grjas. IKrilus & do. 
i-xrlusiiir tSjujli (Sraur (UlntlrtrrB 



— There is more " good style " — in our 
" Models "—this " Fall "—than you would ex- 
pect even from us — Some of 'em are now ready — 
and more coming every day. — 

tOO 1Scatrn« Street 



Augurt 2. 1902. 



9AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



what they wore soiling for. and they would be paying dlvl- 
long after Krone was dead and cold in the grave." 
morning MY. Keono had a very convincing reply In 
•ironlcle. In which he gave the exact condition of tho 
and declared that they could not possibly pay five 
more dividends. They actually paid three, and Mr >. 
still Ursa. Be cleaned up three millions, which came prin- 
cipally from the Bonanza firm, and then went to New York, 
where he continues to thrive. That was the last of the great 
Bonanza deal. 

It is exceedingly doubtful as to 

A Community that whether or not the Pacific Coast 

Lost its Head. gained to any appreciable extent by 

the discovery of the Bonanza. It 
caused the average man hereabouts to lose his head, take 
his money out of legitimate business enterprises, and 10 
grow weary of slow profits. For a time it demoralized 
pretty nearly the whole community. From parsons to 
priests, and from society women to servant maids, they 
all talked of stocks, owned stocks, traded in stocks, and 
dreamed of the fabulous riches of which they were soon 
to be the possessors. Speculation did not nearly confine 
itself to the Bonanza mines. There was phenomenal in- 
flation all along the line. Every claim that was staked out 
in the neighDorhood of Gold Hill and Virginia City had 
shares on the market that were commanding extraordinary 
prices. It mattered not that many of them were not on the 
lode at all, and did not cover so much as "a hole in the 
ground." They were in "the Bonanza country," and that 
sufficed to excite men and women to take their chances 
and "stand in." It was not to be supposed, they argued, 
that Con.-Virginia and California were the only claims 
lying at the foot of Mt. Davidson that contained a Bonanza. 
There were others as sure as fate, that only awaited to be 
uncovered. The experts of the period, such as they were, 
took big fees from the mine owners to help "boom" things. 
They could see where leads came out of the sides of the 
mountain, and where they dipped into the deep ground be- 
low — that they could! Explorations were all that were re- 
quired to uncover countless Bonanzas. The accumulations 
of more than thirty years prosperity, such as no other 
State ever witnessed, were poured into the Comstock lode, 
and drew from the pockets of the many as much money 
probably as the lode ever yielded to a few. No! Cali- 
fornia would be better off to-day, and her development more 
advanced, if Con.-Virginia and California had never been 
heard of. 

As James R. Keene said when he 

Crushing the Bank had closed out his business on Cali- 

of California. fornia street, and was about to 

leave for the East: "The street is 
milked dry. Nobody has any money but the Bonanza firm. 
It will take California twenty years to recover herself. I 
can't wait that long." Mr. Keene was right. California has 
recovered, but it has taken fully twenty years to accom- 
plish it. It was the blow struck at the Bank of California 
by the Bonanza firm that was mainly instrumental in satis- 
fying Mr. Keene that the State was no longer a safe one 
in which to speculate. The Nevada Bank had been estab- 
lished by the Bonanza firm, with the purpose, as it after- 
wards appeared, of crushing, or at least crippling, the Bank 
of California, which under the management of the ever-to- 
be lamented Ralston, was by all odds the leading financial 
institution of the State. It was the latter bank's cus- 
tom to hold itself in readiness to advance the farmers the 
money with which to move their crops. It was known that 
at the end of each harvest the bank's assets had been 
pretty well drawn upon. It was at this season that the 
Bonanza men chose to make their celebrated raid. Several 
of the largest depositors in the Bank of California were 
induced by liberal concessions to transfer their accounts 
to the Nevada Bank. The Bonanza firm had meanwhile 



"(led up" nil the gold In the city. That la to say. they had 

Ingl hanks, nnd hy the payment of a heavy 

premium hn.i Induced them t'> hold their K"i<i subject to the 

la Hank's order fur a certain period. Knlslon had 
collaterals but no gold, and could not get any. The Bank 
of California had to suspend and Ralston was drowned In 
tho bay. whether accidentally or not has never been surely 
known. San Francisco mourns his loss to this day. Ho wns 
the pioneer of much that was useful and great In the city. 



Society people drop into Techau Tavern after the 

theatre. It Is the place par excellence, and the good music 
furnished every evening is a great attraction. 




R. B. HAYDEN" 

HAND MADE SOUR MASH 

WHISKY 



THE FINEST WHISKY MADE 

IN KENTUCKY 
THE HOME OF BOURBONS 

DISTILLED BY 

GREENBRIER DISTILLERY CO. 

Nelson Co., Ky. 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 



Agents Pacific Coast. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Ready Dinner Tube. 

Each tube contains 3 separate dishes, 
seasoning, etc. making a complete 
meal when cooked. 

15 pounds Weight of tubes, contains 
30 days provisions fo r one man. 

Address, American Emergency Food Go. 

207 Battery St., S. F. Gel. 

California and Foreign Marbles Vff' T-T McCORMICK 

African Colored Marble and Onyx w * "• «icv^js.±vi±v,». 

Importer and Manufacturer of 

All Kinds ©f Marble and Granite 

115 CITY HALL AVENUE, NEAR LARKIN ST. San Francisco, Cal. 



D .L^ r For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 

■ jTI ISllv S tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners 
L-/I U«_7I IV-/.-7 dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, ta'lors, etc. 

BUCHANAN BRUS. 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento St., 8. F. Tel., M1 

WIN. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OT ABBBDMN. 



Scotch_Whisky 

importers • MACONDRAY&Ca 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTFR. 



August 2, 1902. 



AN ELOQUENT TRIBUTE. 

The funeral of the late General Barnes, which took place 
on July 24th, under the auspices of the Masons, was one 
or the largest that ever took place in San Francisco. The 
funeral was military in character, being attended by the 
First Infantry Regiment, First Battalion Artillery, Troop A 
Cavalry, and Signal Corps, unuer the command of General 
John H. Dickinson. 

Tne Masonic service was performed by Prelate Judge 
Troutt, and the oration was delivered by Sir Samuel M. 
Shortridge. It was one of the moving funeral eulogies 
ever delivered in this city, and moved many to tears. 

"General Barnes, lawyer, thinker, orator, patriot, lies dead 
before us," said the speaker. "That eye of beauty that 
burned with indignation or beamed with love is lustreless, 
those lips of eloquence are mute, that bewitching voice of 
melody is hushed, and Goa's blessed peace has smoothed 
away the sweat of agony from that imperial brow. 

"We come, his brethren and friends, from all conditions 
of men to pay to our dead brother the tribute of our love and 
tears — from the high courts of justice, Federal and State, 
wherein he stood a worthy minister of the law; from the 
hall of fraternity which to him was a sanctuary of duty and 
religion; from the temple of art at whose shrine he bowed 
a worshipful devotee; from school and academy and univer- 
sity, whose high purposes he proclaimed and in which he 
saw the State's safety and glory; from the avenues of peace 
which he adorned, and the ranks of war in which he marched 
we come to discharge the last sad offices the living owe the 
dead. 

"In the presence of the awful mystery of death — a mystery 
which faith alone can solve — my lips would fain be silent. 
But his brothers and mine, men who knew him long and 
loved him well, have assigned to me the mournful duty 
of voicing the great grief that oppresses us. It is an hour 
when the heart finds solace in a few tender words, in a 
'few broken sentences of veneration and love,' rather than 
in elaborate or studied eulogy. Grant me, therefore, I pray 
you, your indulgence and your sympathy, nor judge the illus- 
trious dead by this unpremeditated and unworthy tribute." 
After outlining General Barnes' career, he said: 
"His great powers as an advocate early placed and have 
kept him in the first rank. He met and contended with or 
against the giants of the bar — with Sanderson, Wilson, and 
McAllister, and with other of our great lawyers. He gave 
and received blows with manly courage, but left all heat 
and passion in the forum. As a jury lawyer he was superb. 
He knew the human heart — all its hidden secret recesses — 
and with master, almost wizard hand played on all its 
strings. Before appellate tribunals he was powerful — all 
courtesy, all respect. His mind was full of learning — 
familiar with time-honored precedents and immortal prin- 
ciples — and with the skill of a master built his arguments 
sure and strong, simple yet beautiful as a Greek temple. 

"Of his eminence — our judgment would say his pre-emi- 
nence — as an orator you will al. bear witness. His fame is 
established. It will survive in memory and in written words. 
It will serve as model for all those who shall strive to utter 
pure, high thoughts in rich and splendid language. It is 
difficult to define oratory; it is perhaps impossible to state 
in what eloquence consists; but if asked to define the one 
or analyze the other I should say that in the noble and 
elevating efforts of General Barnes will be found the most 
satisfactory answer. Poet, thinker, artist, imaginative, he 
gave symmetry and beauty to his thoughts and always di- 
rected the mind upward to the 'bright and shining pathway 
of the stars.' 

"God forgive us — God pity us — when we deny laurel to the 
brow of the living and lay garlands on the tomb of the un- 
replying dead. 

"In the world of thought General Barnes walked and lived. 



His love for art, music, painting, sculpture was genuine 
and sincere. His love for literature — heaven-born poetry 
and mighty prose — wherein the mirth and joy, the tragedy 
and toil of the past move to gladness or provoke to tears 
was a passion. His love for nature — for all the wondrous 
works of God — the sublime and beautiful — Sierra and sea, 
flower and star — amounted to religious worship." 

The speech concluded with the following touching perora- 
tion: 

"And so General Barnes, wit and scholar. lawyer and pa- 
triot, is dead — dead to us, but not to God. The star that has 
set below the horizon and is lost to our poor mortal sight, 
will shine on and on in the celestial firmament, fadeless 
to eternity. 

"It is time this unworthy but loving tribute were ended. 
The portals of the tomb swing open; heavenly voices bid 
him welcome, and the Almighty and Worshipful Master, 
enthroned in majesty unspeakable, says 'Come unto me and 
be at rest.' 
"Farewell, gentle heart and loyal Knight — 
Farewell, a word that must be and hath been, 
A sound which makes us linger — yet — farewell." 




In Your Room. 



Wash delicate things— handkerchiefs, laces, 
doilies, etc. (things which one cannot send 
to the ordinary wash) in Pearline's way, 
viz : SoaK, rinse, squeeze — directions on 
each packet. Spread smoothly while wet, 
on a mirror or window pane. This is bet- 
ter—safer—than ironing. Grand advice for 
bachelors, maidens, boarders and hotel 
guests. Saves fabrics too delicate and valu- 
able to risk to others' hands. 

Pearline is Trustworthy. 



WEAR 



EAGLESON'S 

Fine Shirts and 

Underwear 



748 'ND 750 MARKET STREET 
242 MONTGOMERY STREET 



WEAK MEN AND WOMEN 



Should use DAMIANA BIT- 
TERS, the great Mexican rem- 
edy. Gives health and strength to the sexual organs Depot 
at 323 Market St., San Francisco. Send for circular. 






August 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Novels Revised with 
Neatness and Dispatch. 



It was bad enough to be com- 
pelled to read "Dorothy Ver- 
non of Haddon Hall'— but to 
now have "Mistress Dorothy 
of Haddon Hall" thrust upon one is a calamity. It is by 
Mr. Henry Hastings, and the title page says that it is "the 
true love story of Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall." So it 
seems that Mr. Charles Major didn't give a genuine account 
of Dorothy and John Manners. I suspected several times 
that he was stretching the truth, and my suspicion is veri- 
fied by Mr. Hastings, who now gives the real facts of the 
case — at least, he says he does, and I have no way of prov- 
ing to the contrary. 

But a new field is opened up for authors who have speedy 
typewriters and a paucity of ideas. Ten to one De Foe 
didn't copy Robinson Crusoe's diary correctly — so here's 
a chance for a Hastings or some one of his ilk to tell ex- 
actly how it happened, and answer the old question, "Rob- 
inson Crusoe, why did he do so?" And the "Pilgrims' Pro- 
gress" — just think of the opportunity there is there. Bun- 
yan is so dead that he can't dispute what is written, so 
why not give us a new version? The adventures of the 
"Pickwickians" may have been different, too, from Dickens' 
account of them, and there is no telling whether Becky 
Sharp was really all that Thackeray painted her. And who 
knows that Dante told the truth about his journey through 
Hell? Then there's the "Decameron." Boccaccio probably 
didn't have a stenographer, and ten to one he got those 
delightful stories all twisted. There's no telling what 
liberties Mr. Kipling took with the real circumstances in 
writing "Soldiers Three" or the "Jungle Book" — and the 
"Love Letters of an Englishwoman" may have been fear- 
fully garbled. 

Who in the mischief wants to know any more about Dor- 
othy Vernon? Mr. Major's story wasn't so good as it 
might have been — and Mr. Hastings' is, to be charitable, no 
better. I'll not waste time in telling the plot. Suffice it to 
say that Dorothy and Margaret and Sir George and an old 
nurse named M'adge, are dragged onto the stage. Then there 
are several fellows named Will — "good Will." There are 
duels, wild rides, pompous language, and all the cheap clap- 
trap of the romantic-historical novel. 

Hail, Mr. Henry Hastings, reviser of incorrect stories! 
What a job you've got ahead of you! After a little practice 
you'll be able to give us a new Shakespeare. 

R. F. Fenno & Co., N. Y. Price, $1.00. 

The last number of the "English 

A Chronicle of an Men of Letters Series," being pub- 
Interesting Time, lished by the Macmillans, is a bio- 
graphy of William Hazlitt, essayist 
and critic, written by Augustin Birrell and edited by John 
Morley. It is delightful reading — a charming picture of the 
time in which lived Charles Lamb, Leigh Hunt, and many 
others of the brightest lights of English literature. 

Hazlitt began life as a painter, at which lie was not a 
success. He did not do any better at literature when he 
first started writing, but his talent developed until he be- 
came one of the greatest writers of miscellany that ever 
lived. There was no subject he would not write upon, and 
he made everything he wrote interesting — if not always 
for its truth and justice, at least for its vigor and style. 
He was dramatic critic of a London paper for a year, and 
wrote criticisms that are yet read. He was a great art 
critic, and while his judgment of literature differed from 



thai of must of Ins contemporaries, what he wrote about it 

was literature that «»., worth preserving. 

It was the custom of the literary men of that time — 
early in the last century— to write personal attacks upon 
each oilier for the different newspapers and reviews, and 
Hazlitt did his share of the work. And it can be said that 
there were few if any who attacked an enemy with greater 
venom than he. lie always kept up his end of the fight — 
and he had many a fight on his hands. Personally he was not 
a lovable man. being egotistical, selfish and overbearing. 
With all this he could not understand why people did not 
like him — in fact, some of his complaints against the cold- 
ness of his acquaintances were almost pathetic. 

Hazlitt did much for English literature. He wrote much 
that should not have been published — but when this is 
weeded out, there remains plenty of matter that anyone can 
read with benefit. 

The Macmillan Co., New York and London. 

Messrs. J. Herbert Welch and 

The St. Pierre Disaster. H. E. Taylor have written and 
compiled an interesting ac- 
count of the recent volcanic disaster that destroyed the 
city of St. Pierre, on the Island of Martinique. It is partly 
compiled from newspaper accounts of the time, and there 
is considerable space devoted to "Other Eruptions and 
Some Earthquakes" and the "Causes of Volcanic Action." 
It is an interesting little volume, and will be more so in 
years to come. 

R. F. Fenno & Co., New York. Price, 50 cents. 

Some people may have the patience to read "Some Letters 
of Alfred Henry," a very small volume published anony- 
mously by "The Informant Co., Cleveland, Ohio," but I will 
confess to an inability to do so. I tried to ascertain what 
it is about, but reading it gives no clew. 



Pears' 

• 
Whoever wants soft 
hands, smooth hands, white 
hands, or a clear complex- 
ion, he and she can have 
both : that is, if the skin is 
naturally transparent; un- 
less occupation prevents. 

The color you want to 
avoid comes probably nei- 
ther of nature or work, but 
of habit. 

Use Pears' Soap, no 
matter how much; but a 
little is enough if you use 
it often. 

^Established over loo years. 



I0SEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS, SIFof^im 1 

"GRAND PRIX" PARIS. 1900. THE HIGHEST POSSIBLE 

AWARD. These pens are l the beat in the world." 

Sole aarent for the United Stai ea. 

Ms, Henry Hob, 91 John Street New York. 

Sold by all stationers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 




*Pkajurels 
Wand 



■"j 



o wand but Measure's 




There is joy among the music lovers, for the grand opera 
season is on at the Tivoli. Again there is wild nightly 
tumult, and excited "bravos" are hurled across the foot- 
lights at the Italian singers who have come all the way 
from Italy to interpret grand opera for the people of San 
Francisco. And good singers they are, too — the best col- 
lection that the Tivoli has ever had. They presented time- 
honored "Aida" Monday night to a packed house, and re- 
ceived a reception that must have made their childish 
hearts glad — in fact, it did make them glad, and they did 
not try to conceal the fact. You know, it is quite a journey 
all the way from Italy to San Francisco — and suppose that, 
after coming all these many thousand miles, our people had 
received the singers coldly! But nothing of the kind hap- 
pened. The audience warmed to the artists from the start, 
and the enthusiasm increased as the evening went on. And 
the singers rewarded their hearers in a unique way. They 
tore to pieces the baskets and bundles and boquets of flow- 
ers which had been passed over the footlights, and in an 
ecstacy of pleasure at the recognition of their merit, threw 
posies by the handful out to the delighted audience. They 
are charmingly ingenuous and naive, these Italian sing- 
ers — and they took the best way they knew how to tell the 
people that they were just tickled to death to be given such 
a reception — after all that journey. The flower-throwing 
startled the audience a little at first, but when the first 
gasp of astonishment was over a great roar of approval 
went up — a thrilling roar of generous appreciation that 
caused the singers to grow even more abandoned in their 
delight, and turned into a great glad-hand festival. Leader 
Steindorff was not forgotten, either, and flanked by Italian 
warblers this good German leader — who interprets Verdi 
as though he had been reared on red wine and spaghetti — 
came before the footlights for his share of the applause. 
It was a goodly share, too — and thoroughly deserved. 

Probably the majestic Aida. was never given a better 
performance at the Tivoli than on Monday night, even 
though it was a first night, introducing singers who 
are new here, and were naturally a little nervous. In- 
terest, of course, centered in Signorina Ines De Frates, 
the dramatic sopiano, and it needed but a few mo- 
ments to show that she was up to requirements. She has 
a brilliant voice, clear, bell-like, and under perfect control. 
It is rarely forced, and when it is the clearness of the notes 
recompenses. She is not a mechanical singer, but enters 
into the spirit of the part — that is, vocally, for her dramatic 
efforts are much misguided. Her tones are full of sym- 
pathy and feeling. 

Signorina Marie Pozzi, the contralto, who sang Amneris, 
was a little of a disappointment at first. But she pulled 
herself together, and soon was singing with ease and free- 
dom. In Aida she did not show herself a marvel, but a very 
good singer, nevertheless, with a pleasing voice that may 
show to more advantage in other operas. 

Radames was sung by Signor Pietro Venerandi, the new 
dramatic tenor, who was a success from the start. His 
voice is of excellent quality, free, clear and ringing. He 
-labored under the disadvantage of singing the great "Ce- 
leste Aida," while the crowd was still bustling in; but he 
went through it with triumph, and was rewarded by tre- 
mendous approval. If he follows with such work as he did 
in Aida there are some good things in store for Tivoli audi- 
ences. 

Nobody was disappointed in Signor Michele De Pardova. 
who sang Amanasro. Few better baritones are heard. His 



voice is not quite so large as Salassa's, but it is wonderfully 
melodious and flexible. He sings without any apparent 
effort, and acts well. He is full of dramatic Are and inten- 
sity. His personality and his voice are both full of life and 
magnetism. 

Signor Augusto Dado, who was Ramphis, is an old favor- 
ite here, and sang his part in a big, booming, resonant voice. 
He suffers no disadvantage by comparison with the new 
people. 

There is not much to be said one way or the other of 
Signor Pilado De Paoli, who sang the King — or at least, 
if he has a voice out of the ordinary, it did not show in 
that part. His voice is a Ugh- basso, of agreeable tone, 
what there is of it. 

• • • 

Italian opera in Scottish kilts, "Lucia di Lammermoor," 
alternated with "Aida," and introduced three more new 
singers, Signor Alfredo Zonghi, lyric tenor, as Lord Ed;;ar; 
Signor Emilio DAlbore, baritone, as Henry Ashton, and 
Signorina Tina De Spada, lyric soprano, who sang Lucy 
Ashton. The opera was give a fine presentation. 

I haven't much faith in press agents, and supposed there 
was a deal of exaggeration in the foreword that extolled 
the merit of this soprano, Tina De Spada. But she is even 
better than she was heralded. She is young, tall, slender, 
dark-haired and low of brow, with a tragic face and a di- 
vine voice, clear, limpid, true, of great range and unusual 
sweetness. She sings "Lucia" as it was never before sung 
at the Tivoli, and aroused the audiences to roars and shouts 
of approval. Her notes have that magic quality that induces 
moist eyes — that tenderness and sympathy which, combined 
with merit and technical skill, make great singers. She has 
temperament, too, and dramatic ability, making the mad 
scene something to be remembered aside from its vocal 
beauties. 

The lyric tenor, Zonghi, proved himself an artist of 
merit, possessing a good, smooth, flexible voice. DAlbore, 
the baritone, is also a singer of ability. His voice is 
rather light, but is clear and flexible, and he sang Henry 
Ashton in a thoroughly creditable manner. Raymond was 
sung by Dado, whose big bass voice is constantly improv- 
ing. Anna Wilson sang Alice very prettily and in good 
voice. 

• * * 

Miss Florence Roberts is playing "Camille" again at the 
Alcazar to packed houses. There is little but praise to be 
written of Miss Roberts in this part. It was one of her first 
successes, and continues to draw. Of the many plays of the 
Camille order it is the only one that will live — and that be- 
cause of its appeal to the best in human nature. It has no 
stair-case scenes, no dressing room revelations, no exhibi- 
tions of coarseness, passion or vulgarity. It is the story 
of pure love between a man and a woman, and is purely 
told. Its continued success is proof that the theatre-going 
public is not quite so bad as some pessimists think it. They 
chase gorgeous, flashing butterflies — but they come back 
to the quieter, more human attractions of Dumas' beautiful 
story. 

One can see Miss Roberts in the name part many times 
without tiring. She plays it with delicacy and intelligence. 
Her voice and manner seem peculiarly adapted to portray- 
ing the beautiful consumptive, and in no part of it does she 
cease to act with refined art. 

Mr. White Whittlesey plays Armand Duval well — better 
than most who have essayed the part. There are several 
strong scenes, to which he does full justice. Mr. George 
Osborne is good as Monsieur Duval, and the other parts 
are in good hands. 

• * a 

Mr. Stephen Grattan and Maud White are the leaders in 
entertainment at the Orpheum this week, presenting an ex- 
tremely funny sketch, "Locked Out at 3 a. m." It details the 



August 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



i-.-nce of a man and a noruuu locked oui o( the tlat at 
which each hail apartments. There are many amusim; situa- 
tions and some extremely clever dialogue. 

The .Matettl troupe, eight in number, do an acrobatic turn 
that Is marvelous in strength, endurance and activity. 

Katberine liloodgood has returned and is dellghtln. 
Orpheum audiences with her songs. 

Zara and Zara, lightning change artists, do a turn tbat is 
very Interesting. \V. j, vy. 



Xtlle. Clara llallerinl, European dancer and aerial per- 
former, will come to the Orpheum next week. J. K. Emmett 
and Anna Mortland will appear in a three scene sketch, A 
Honeymoon in a Harlem Flat," Arthur Ballerini will ex- 
hibit a lot of trained dogs. The holdovers will be Grattan 
and White. Katherine Bloodgood, the Mazetts, Zara and 
Zara. and the biograph. An attraction shortly to be seen 
at the Orpheum is Jean Marcels living art studies, being re- 
productions of bas-reliefs, groups, statues, etc., represented 
by twenty-fi ve living models. 

• * • 

"Camille" will continue at the Alcazar next week. Monday, 
August 11th, "Sapho" will be revived. 

* • * 

The Miller-Anglin Company will put on "The Only Way" 
next Monday evening, with Mr. Miller as Sydney Carton 
and Miss Anglin as Mlmi. 

• . m 

"Pousse Cafe," "Antony and Cleopatra," and "The Royal 
Family" continue to crowd Fischer's Theatre. New features 
are added each week. 

* * * 

On Monday, Wednesday and Friday of next week the 
Tivoli will put on Donizetti's "Favorita," and on Tuesday, 
Thursday and Sunday nights ana Saturday matinee will pre- 
sent "Carmen." Agostini will be the tenor in the first opera 
and Marie Pozzi will sing Leonora. Miehele De Padova will 
be the king. Anna Wilson sings Ines, and Dado will be heard 
as Baldacene. In Carmen, Collamarini will of course have 
tne name part. Russo will be Don Jose, and D'Albore the 
Toreador. Tina de Spada will have the role of Michaela, 
and Mercides will be sung by Anna Wilson. 



Congressman F. G. Newlands of Nevada, was a visitor to 
San Francisco this week. He is one of the managers of the 
Sharon estate, and the object of his visit was to inspect the 
new plans for the alteration of the Palace Hotel. Although 
the plan to increase the height of the building by two stor- 
ies is still under contemplation it is not the intention of 
the management to make that change at present. The 
lower floor is to be paved with marble and furnished as a 
sort of lounging place. Carriages will no longer enter, but 
a semi-circular driveway will be constructed in what is now 
the entrance from New Montgomery street. About two 
hundred rooms will he re-furnished, and the big American 
dining room will be re-furnished as a sitting room. 



The September number of the Overland Monthly maga- 
zine, of which Bret Harte was the first editor, will be a 
Bret Harte Memorial number, and promises to be the finest 
magazine ever issued on the Pacific Coast. It will be full 
of all sorts of matter relating to Mr. Harte, contributed by 
some of the most famous men of letters, who were his asso- 
ciates. It will also republish several of his best stories, 
newly illustrated. 



- — -It is a pleasure to drop into Zinkand's after the 
theatre, eat of the good things set before . you there, and 
listen to the excellent music. The best people in town 
make Zinkand's their headquarters. 



An old-fashioned toddy— either hot or cold— Is a great drink 

if made of "Jesse Moore" Whisky. A little sugar, a little water, 
then the pure stuff— "Jesse Moore" Whisky. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper ft Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Alcazar Theatre. B ""'""°* T " iL, 'p h M .; n .T.^ r . 

KMtDM S„l,,t,l«y. Qlortooi Triumph ..I 

MISS FLORENCE ROBERTS 

Suj.pnrlt.l !, r While WhlUlmr. The .leman.l for nail lor tills Week 
fwliiff are.ler Ihnn thr c.rnicily of lb.- tlit.ter. 

GAMILLE 

will be continued all next week. Sent" l.ir nc*l week now readr. 

Prlces-Evenlnffs. inc. 25c, 85e, SOo * 75c. Mutineer 15o, 35o. 36c. BOo. 
Monday, August nth by everybody's wish, '\Sapho." 

Golumbia Theatre. 

Beginning Next Monday. August 4. 

Matinees Wednesday and Saturday. Charles Frohman presenting 

HENRY MILLER MARGARET ANGLIN 

and a special company hi the great romantic success 

ThE ONLY WAY 

Henry Miller as Sydnay Carton. Margaret Anglln appearing for the 
first time here In her original role of Mtral. 



WoTTi.nn, Marx A f o 

leasees anu Manage™. 



Fischer's Theatre 



As if by magic thousands continue to pack the theater nightly. 
Our great triple bill of 

POUSSE GAFE 

ANTONY A^D CLEOPATRA AND A ROYAL FAMILY 
The best what is. The quality Is there. Our all stock company. Kolb 
and Dill and Bernard, Blake, Hermsen. De Forrest, Amber, Evans, 
Vidot, Hope, Emerson and the only earthly chorus. 
Seats selling two weeks ahead. 

Tl!//^!! Onnrn H „..,-. „ MBS.BEHKSTIHKKEBII.IB0. 
IVOII (JPera llOUSe. Proprietor and Manager 

Evenings at 8 sharpl Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp! 

To-night, Al DA, Sunday Night, LUGIA Dl LAMMERMOOW. 

Week of August 4th— Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Saturday, Doni- 



zetti's 



LA FAUORITA 



Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday Nights, and Saturday Matinee, Bizet's 
Famous 

GARMEN 

No Advance in prices— 25, 50, and 75 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 

OL rtl .„_ San FranolBCo's Greatest Music Hall, 
i P n 6 U m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Week commencing Sunday Matinee, Augusts, 

MLLE. CLARA BALLER I hi ; J- K. Emmet and Anna Mortland; 
Arthur Ballerini: Grattan, White and Company; Katherine Blood- 
good: Zara and Zara: Lew Hawkins: The Biograph, and last week of 
THrZ MAZETT1 TROUPE. . 

Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

Reserved seats, 25o: Balcony lOe; opera chairs and box seats. 50c. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the 
finest wines beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand Is society's gathering place after 
the theatre Is over. 

CRAId BROS.: 120 Sutter Street, San Francisco 

IMPORTERS OF 

Scotch Tweeds 

AND FINE WOOLENS 

Suits $30 and up, Telephone Davis, 910 



BLAKE, MOFFITT 
&TOWNE 



Dealers 
in 



TELEPHONE MAIN 199 



PAPER 



55-57-59-61 First Street, San Francisco. 

Blake, Moffitt & Towne, Los Angeles. Oa 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland. Or. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The Risdon I ron and Locomotive Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Loco- 
motive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year and the 
transaction of such other business as may be brought before the mee'ing 
will be held at the office of the company, No. 298 Sieuart Street. San Fran- 
eisoo, on MONDAY, the 4th day of August, 19i 2. at U o'clook A, H, 

AUGUSTUS TAYLOB. Secretary. 



12 



fcAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER\ 



August 2, 1902. 




Notice. 
Official notices and circulars of general interest from the 
officers of the Automobile Club of California will appear in 

this department. 

* * * 
The Automobile Club of California, 415 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco. Telephone Main 934. Officers: MT. F. A. 
Hyde, President; Dr. F. J. Tillman, Vice-President; Mr. A. 
C. Aiken, Secretary; Mr. Byron Jackson, Treasurer. 



Touring Committee. — Mr. E. P. Brinegar, chairman; 
H. Courtney Ford, and Mr. George H. Whitney. 



Mr. 



Official. 

July 28, 1902. 
To the Members of the Automobile Club of California: 

There will be a club run to San Mateo on Sunday, the 3rd 
of August. Messrs. E. P. Brinegar, E. Courtney Ford and 
George F. Whitney constitute a special committee to take 
charge thereof. Automobiles will assemble at 9 a. m. at 
the corner of Van Ness avenue and Market street, and will 
proceed in line to the Hotel Mateo at San Mateo. A lunch 
will be provided there, for which the charge will be fifty 
cents each. The programme thereafter will be arranged by 
the committee. Yours truly, 

A. C. AIKEN, Secretary. 

* * * 

Automobile Club of San Jose. — Mr. B. T. Sterling, Presi- 
dent; Mr. B. D. Merchant, Secretary; General Executive 
Committee: Messrs. Frank Coykendall, Harry Bercovich, 
Charles Chrisman, E. T. Sterling, and B. D. Merchant. 

* * • 

A carload of electric carriages, suitable for physicians. 
were due to arrive this week. These machines were con- 
structed especially to meet local requirements, and it will 
be interesting to watch their behavior on our grades and 
cobbles. Certainly, if the genius of the American inventor 
can produce a serviceable electric machine, it will meet 
with favor among those who can pay from $1200 upwards 
for a motor car. At present the steam and gasoline cars 
are the only ones considered by Pacific Coast purchasers, 
and they are bound to be the popular types for general use 
for a long time to come. 

* * * 

The August Overland Monthly is an automobile number, 
and contains several finely illustrated articles regarding 
automobiles. Undoubtedly, this number will assist in cas- 
ing popular attention to the merits of the motor car as a 
pleasure vehicle. California is an ideal State for out-door 
sports, and automobiling is sure to become the standard 
pastime of many of her citizens. 



Motor Review of June 14th, 1902, page 4: 
We quote the following from the Automobile and 

Summarizing the results secured with the 'WHITE' 
"steam carriage B— 65 in tbe Memorial Day endurance run, its 
"steam generating system combined with the condenser made 
"possible a run of 100 miles on six gallons of water and 5% gal- 
lons of gasoline, as against an average of 95% gallons ot water 
"and 13 gallons of gasoline for all other blue ribbon steam car- 
"riages and an average of 6% gallons of gasoline for all blue rib- 
"bon hydro carbon vehicles." 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY 

300 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
C. A. Hawkins, General Asrent. 



It is not alone in California that autos and pile drivers 
are placed in the same category, for the dispatches from 
London state that in spite of the enthusiasm with which 
society has taken up automobiling its devotees, both from 
a sporting and business standpoint, are wofully handicap- 
ped by the archaic English law, which classes automobiles 
and steam rollers in the same category, as well as the hit- 
ter hostility of the country magistrates who line the subur- 



**• 'XocomobiW *-£& 

1622*628 MARKET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Take pleasure in an- 
nouncing that they 
are now handling: 



GASOLINE 
AUTOMOBILES 

and represent the folio wine well-known manufacturers: 

Wlnton Motor Carriage Company. Cleveland, Ohio; United States Long- 
Distance Automobile Company, New York, N. Y.; Buffalo Automobile and 
Auto-Bi. Company, Buffalo, N. Y.; Smith & Mabley, American Agents 
"Panhard— The Peuget." 

Full and Complete Line of Parts and Accessories, Automobile Leather 
Clothing for Ladies and Gentlemen, Lamps, French Horns, etc. 



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"MASON" AUTO ENGINE 



is the most successful cneine on the market from every stand- 
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BOSTON, 
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(MENTION THE "nEWS LETTER") 



August 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 




An automobile freak which proved to be the fastest vehicle in the world. 



ban roads with police patrols, and every week arrest scores 
of motorists, who are invariably convicted and fined for 
violating the speed laws, irrespective of any evidence ex- 
cept that of the prosecuting policeman. The English mo- 
toring world is anxiously speculating on the possibility of 
bringing off next year's James Gordon Bennett cup race 
within the United Kingdom, one of the conditions of the 
competition being that the race shall be run in the country 
where the cup is held. Selfridge, winner of the recent con- 
test for the trophy, thinks there is a possibility of holding 
the race in Ireland, though this is an unpleasant prospect, 
since the Irish roads are admittedly worse than those of 
the Paris-Vienna courses. 

* * * 

Agencies report a fair demand for auto cars, and that 
there is every indication that a brisk fall trade will re- 
sult. 

* « * 

The articles in the August Overland Monthly relating to 
automobiles are as follows: Frontispiece, "King Edward VII 
in His Motor Car;" "The Automobile as an Aid to Busi- 
ness," by George F. Whitney; "The Automobile Club of Cali- 
fornia," by F. A. Hyde, President; "Automobiling in the 
Tosemite," by Dr. W. A. Clarke; "Automobile Endurance," 
by C. A. Hawkins; "The Construction of the Automobile," 
by L. H. Johnson. 

* * * 

This department will be pleased to hear of any credit- 
able performance by an automobile, and those interested 
are invited to send paragraphs interesting and apropos. 



That Scotland Yard detectives just missed arresting Cap- 
tain Strong in London comes as a sad blow to his many 
friends in this country. 



Pure Cow's Milk 
made sterile and guarded against contamination, from be- 
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Swain's Bakery, on Sutter street, is the headquarters 

for San Francisco's most exclusive people. For twenty-five 
years It has enjoyed this distinction, and all through the 
high standard it maintains. It is a favorite luncheon place 
for shoppers 



Your suits will soon become old looking, baggy and 

shabby if you do not have them pressed and cleaned 
regularly. Send them to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing 
Works, 127 Stockton street, where they will be put in proper 
shape. They also clean gloves, cravats, curtains, laces, 
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HOW DO THEY DO IT 



Those new Hehtninc "speed 



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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 




It is regarded as one of the choicest bits of humor on 
the social stage that the "Baron" von Meder attempted to 
borrow three thousand dollars from Mr. S. G. Murphy, the 
banker. It is not easy to borrow money of Mr. Murphy un- 
less one has a fortune to give in securities. He did lend 
Mr. Hermann Oelrichs a million dollars to contest the Fair 
will with, but then, of course, he had excellent security. 
When one asks Mr. Murphy for money without security, 
he closes his eyes, opens his mouth, and emits a sound that 
may be agony or a mere guffaw. No one has yet inter- 
preted what the sound would denote. It may be that Meder 
was curious to see this peculiar financial phenomenon, or 
it is possible he is just a trusting child. M"ueh mystery has 
been made of the name of the rescuer of Von Meder from 
prison. All sorts of rumors have been afloat, but it was 
really not a female adorer, but Mr. Hermann Oelrichs, who 
like every one else took a great fancy to the engaging 
young German, and put him up at the Pacific Union Club. 
Mr. Oelrichs' father was German, and he has a weakness 
for that language, which he speaks with great fluency. Von 
Meder was such a great friend of his that he felt in a meas- 
ure responsible for him, and so he did his duty to society 
as well as a kindness to the stranger by paying more than 
a thousand dollars to procure his release. 
* * • 

Apropos of the general indignation against the Hackmen's 
Union for their action in the case of the funeral of the late 
General Barnes, I might say that there are plenty of people 
in society who have a score to settle with the industrial body 
of which M'r. E. Duplessis Beyiard is the most distinguished 
member. Not long ago, a young society woman hired a cab 
and directed the driver to take her to a well-known house 
where it was her purpose to make an evening call. After 
she had been driven about for some time it. occurred to her 
that it was about time to arrive, so she looked out of the 
window and noticed to her surprise that she was in a dark 
street and a strange part of the city. She called to the 
cabman, and in response to her inquiries he replied that he 
had lost his way, but would soon be right. The young 
woman's next glimpse out of the window revealed the suspi- 
cious fact that the cabman was driving her around in a cir- 
cle, so she naturally became somewhat alarmed. She called 
to him again to either take her to her destination or else 
return home, but the insolent fellow only replied that he 
would do neither. Fortunately the carriage was standing 
still during this parley, and the girl was able to climb out 
and get away. The next morning her father indignantly tele- 
phoned to the manager of the company which employed the 
piratical cabman. The manager called in person, and ex- 
plained almost tearfully that the offensive cabman was vic- 
ious, dangerous and incompetent, but that if he were dis- 
charged the Haekman's Union would revenge themselves 
by ruining his business. 

So the case rests, to the honor of a free country, where 
Labor would make all brutes free and equal. 

w * • 

It is not known generally that General Barnes died of a 
malignant cancer of the throat and stomach. A few weeks 
ago, when the operation on his throat was performed, the 
physicians told Mrs. Barnes that there was very little hope 
for her husband, but the General was not informed of the 
seriousness of his malady. He submitted heroically to the 
most painful laceration of his throat, and no anesthetic was 
given him. Until the last moment it was not published, at 
the request of Mrs. Barnes, that her husband had a cancer, 



for even while dying he insisted upon reading all the news- 
papers. When he died it was without knowing why. After 
his death, Mrs. Barnes slept by his body on a cot, and her 
grief was pitiful. The General, when at Yale, was a room- 
mate and afterwards life-long friend of Mr. Edmund Clar- 
ence Stedman, the poet. 

* * • 

Tracy, the fireman, is a character well known to every 
man, woman and child South of Market street. He has a 
great admiration for Tracy, the fugitive convict, and when 
the refugee from justice first began his daring exploits, 
Tracy declared he was his cousin, but later on, when he 
escaped the entire posse persuing him, the convict claimed 
him for his brother. 

* * * 

Mr. Charlie Seymour, who used to be on the Chronicle, 
later returned to his home in Chicago, where his brother 
owned a newspaper. When "Bob" Fitzsimmons fought in 
El Paso, Texas, Mr. Seymour and M'r. George Ade, who has 
achieved national fame, were reporting the nght for their 
Chicago papers. It was rather a wild night in El Paso, 
and Mr. Seymour made a bet of a bottle of champagne that 
some one would be shot and killed before the night was 
over. The two men had no sooner gone to their rooms when 
they heard what seemed like forty shots in a minute. Mr. 
Seymour yelled with delight, and Mr. Ade said, "I've lost 
my bet," and then he ordered the champagne. The next 
morning they started out to learn who was dead. They 
inquired everywhere, but could find no one. Finally they 
discovered a plate glass window broken in one of the shops, 
and it was for this disaster that Mr. Ade lost his bet. 

* * * 

Notwithstanding the fact that all the Spreekels married 
poor girls, Mr. John D. has a fear that his children will be 
married for money, and so he demands that those allyin? 
themselves with them have some of their own. He approves 
thoroughly of the Huntington-SprecKels engagement, and 
young "Jack" was obliged to ask his consent, for he is not 
yet twenty-one. Little more than a year ago, he took one 
of his daughters to Australia, because she had an attach- 
ment for a poor young man from Woodland. She came 
back cured, and I should recommend sea voyages to careful 
parents. 

* • * 

Mothers are complaining of the scarcity of men for their 
daughters, and one of the reasons is the many bachelor 
clubs in the city. The time has passed when the young 
girl Is content to start to housekeeping with two or three 
rooms, and do her own work as perhaps her mother did. 



ALTERATION SALE 

On account of entire rearrangement of 
the different floors, we give an oppor- 
tunity to buy «s* J* <J* J* «s* 

Pictures, Statuary 

Fancy Furniture, Va.ses 

Ornaments, Crockery 

and Glassware 

At a Large Discount 

for two weeks only, commencing Monday, Aug. 4. 

S. & G. GUMP CO., H3 Geary Street 



August 2. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



lb 



She has b««n reared luxuriously, and she Intends lo hsro 
s big establishment of her own. Clubs like "The Hollus- 
cblrkle." the Russian for "Bachelor Seals." ami 'T 
boys." enable congenial spirits to live together vor. 
for thirty dollars a month. They have n housekeeper, en- 
tertaln. live well, and have all the lomfnrts of 
unlay evening. "The Abbeys" entertained The llollus- 
chlckles" with a yachting party on the bay. Most .>f the 
young men In these clubs arc graduates of altber li- irl 
Stanford, or Eastern universities. 

• • • 

Mr. Richard Hotaling is to be the sire of Ihe Midsummer 
Bohemian Jinks, and the entertainment is to be extremely 
original. All the tall men in the club have been calleil into 
use, for this is to be an Indian jinks. 

• • • 

The different views entertained at the present date 
on the sacred teachings of the Christian religion, are as 
varied as the creeds themselves. Reverence and irrever- 
ence go hand in hand, and according to the Constitution of 
this great Republic, the pagan who still bows down to wood, 
stone and Brumagem types of god-head is just as much en- 
titled to consideration and respect as the man who recog- 
nizes the Ten Commandments of the God of Abraham, Isaac 
and Jacob. Take for instance contemporary stories of 
Ireland and the Philippines. • Less than six weeks ago 
the inmates of the poorhouse in North Dublin were sadly 
mixed up over a point of creed. This institution is divided 
into two parts, one for Catholics and the other for Protest- 
ants. The latter being short of help in the laundry, bor- 
rowed a laundress from the otner side, who had to wash for 
some Protestant nurses. The result was the Catholic 
chaplain entered a solemn protest to the Poor Law Guard- 
ians, who promptly ordered that in future no Catholic 
pauper, male or female, should be employed in Protestant 
section. A newspaper commenting on this enquired if the 
laundress who entered the infected region had been quar- 
antined on her return. A little previous to the date of this 
Dublin occurrence. American soldiers entered a Manila 
cathedral in the Philippines during one of their armed for? 
ays, and dethroning the patron saint from his niche 
over the altar, attired him in costume as sentry, and placed 
the figure on guard at the door. Another valuable figure, 
representing one whose name should be sacred to every 
Christian regardless of creed, constructed in sections, was 
in turn destroyed, the fragments being divided and carried 
off in toto as dice in memento by the iconoclastic raiders. 
What a funny old world this is, to be sure, when all is said 
and done. 



A wit once said of a friend, "You can't get an idea into 
his head, and you can't get an idea out of his head." Noth- 
ing could be more apt in the case of Dr. J. C. Anthony, who 
had as a patient Mrs. Katherine Ball. Mts. Ball had rheu- 
matism, and Dr. Anthony advised her to fast as a cure for 
it. She fasted for forty-five days, then died. Dr. Anthony 
persists that it was not starvation that killed her, but a 
complication. Probably a complication of quackery, ignor- 
ance and malpractice. It is a very cheerful view that the 
doctor takes of the case — a view made more cheerful by the 
fact that it was a patient instead of himself who starved to 
death. 



The fact that Klondike grocers with abundant stocks re- 
cuse to give credit to starving miners, gives a contrary view 
to the general impression that gold is plenty and provis- 
ions scarce in the far North. 




"YOUR BOSOM FRIEND." 

Mr. John T. Gibson, better known as ' Your Bosom Fri- 
ts probably the best-known men hanl among the smaller 
rs of San Francisco. 

The story of hi 
aa a dealer in men's fur- 
Diallings is an Interesting 
one. He has at all times 
been a beUerer m agfl 
Blve, original advertising, 
and the originality of his 
publicity has been tie- 
means of his success as a 
merchant. 

Mr. Gibson is a member 
of the California Lodge 
No. 1, Uniform Rank, 56, 
and takes the same active 
interest in his fraternal 
affairs as he takes in his 
business. He is practically 
the youngest merchant ron- 
Mr. John T. Gibson. ducting a store of any size 

in San Francisco, and there is no doubt that the business of 
his establishment is growing faster than Mr. Gibson is grow- 
ing in years. 

As an example of his originality, he advertises that he 
believed in expansion, stating that he was an expansionist, 
and to prove the truth of his position he said he had decided 
to take in the "Philippine" Candy Store next door. 

This is one of the many schemes he has worked to adver- 
tise his business. There is always quite a little crowd in 
front of his store interested in reading his window signs, 
and there are often times when the store of Gibson needed 
an officer to keep the crowds from blocking the sidewalks. 
Mr. Gibson attends to every detail of his establishment 
himself, and watches his trade, its demands and the market 
carefully. He has met the requirements of his customers, 
he has treated them well, and as a result has built up his 
business on a solid foundation. If there were more small 
merchants of Gibson's calibre actively interested In the 
mercantile business of San Francisco, the big department 
stores would be taking less business from their weaker 
competitors. 

It is not a matter of capital that always counts — Mr. Gib- 
son has proven this. He smarted with a very small estab- 
lishment and a limited amount of money. He has succeeded 
purely through his own aggressive management and the 
deep personal interest he has taken in his business. 



Moore's Poison Oak Remedy, 
cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



STOP! 



Wasting Time — 
Time is floney 



Dr. Charles W. Decker. 

Dentist, 806 Market. Specialty "Colton Gas" for painless teeth 
extracting. iJil 

It has been said that "all whisky Is good." But "Jesse 

Moore" is better than others. Found at all first-class places. 



flo lone as you file correspond- 
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Because you must file everu, name beginning with the 
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When a certain letter is desired you 
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16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 




'Xear tie Crier') ".i/hat We devil art thou ' '. 
"One that wilt play the devil , jir, wlthyou ' 




own \~rter 



Old Farmer Brown beheld his wheat 

All shrunk and rotted, too. 
He should have cried, he should have wept, 

But that he didn't do. 

He gave it to the miller man 

Who lived upon the hill; 
The miller man he took the wheat 

And put it in his mill. 

The mill it ground, the mill it squeaked, 

The mill it turned and screwed, 
And soon the rotten wheat came out 

As patent breakfast food. 

They named it "Hunko-Bunco Flour," 

And when they sold the fraud, 
They realized a million clear, 

Retired and lived abroad. 

It couldn't have happened anywhere but in Oakland. 
There's a witch over there, and, according to tradition, she 
has a beard. There is also a colored barber there, named 
York. The witch came into his shop, probably because she 
wished to have her beard shaved and give up witching. 
But she couldn't fool York. He is from the "Souf," and 
knew she was a witch as soon as he saw her. He immedi- 
ately threw her out, then closed his shop, declaring that 
everything in it had been hoodooed. He refuses to work in 
the place any more, and has applied to the police for pro- 
tection. These niggers get too gay when they come North — 
in the South they would be skinned alive for a less offense 
than conspiring for the arrest of a white, witch or no witch. 

It's both a wonder and a pity that all the liquor consumed 
by John L. Sullivan has not killed him. But he still lives, 
still gets drunk, and still gets into trouble. His latest 
feat was to call on Terry McGovern at four o'clock in the 
morning, full of mixed liquors, and kick over a cage contain- 
ing a wild cat. The animal, with very poor taste, grabbed 
the ex-prize-fighter's leg and did considerable damage. I 
am glad of it. It was a case of brute against brute, and it 
pleases me that the smaller one was victor. 

In this time of fake fights and pugilistic opulence, it is 
refreshing to note that the ancient and noble sport is still 
pursued in all its pristine purity among the vigorous lower 
classes. It did not require a $15,000 stake to bring off a 
match last Tuesday between James Doyle and Henry How- 
ard of the waterfront. Five cents, coin of the realm, was 
all the money Involved, but the manful earnestness of their 
fisticuffs was sufficient to bring tears of reminiscence to 
the eyes of true sport. Nails, teeth, tables, chairs, beer 
utensils, crockery, were brought into play with the greatest 
skill, and gameness — ah, the good old days of Mitchell and 
Ryan, when prize-fighters were not pugilists or actors, but 
the strenuous brutes they are supposed to be! 

Here's another fire laid to the cigarette. A flume and 
bridge were burned near Modesto Monday, and the dis- 
patches gravely announced that it is supposed a smoker 
threw a cigarette stub on the floor of the bridge, starting 
the conflagration. It's always the cigarette that's held 
responsible, when in fact a cigar stub, because of its larger 
size and the time it retains Are, is much more dangerous. 
The poor cigarette fiend! It's bad enough to be what he 
is without being blamed for every fire that occurs. 



You see, the trouble is that human nature refuses to re- 
gard a thief as a thief until he has actually pocketed 
the money. This is a shame, because kleptomania is 
undoubtedly a disease, and it should be treated at 
its inception. When the patient shows his first mania to 
klep, he should be taken care of in San Quentin or some 
other well-conducted sanitarium. If William H. J. White, 
cashier of the Board of Public Works, had been caught in 
time, he might never have been an absconder. He had, for 
a long time, shown the first symptoms of kleptomania. 
Tenderloinitis broke out in spots on him and created in the 
patient a desire to drink everything in sight and never to 
sleep at home. Horseomania was the next to show itself, 
and heavy spendyasis was of course the natural result. 
When a man in a position where other people's money is 
laying around loose, gets so far gone as this, isn't it time 
for his friends to lock him up with a private physician be- 
fore he gets his name in the papers and his picture in the 
Rogues' Gallery? 

On, dear! what a cackling arises from Pacific Grove! 
What can it be? Has a shipment of three million hens been 
dumped on the siding of that religious town? Have all the 
poultry raisers in the universe convened there to exhibit 
their Leghorns, Shanghais and Plymouth Rocks? Not so. 
The congress of reforms of the Women's Christian Temper- 
ance Union is met together, and the world is becoming 
(theoretically) sweeter and better. The noisy old ladies 
are having just lots of fun, for there is so much evil In 
the world, don't you know, and they could never go to bed 
with a clear conscience unless all the world's litter of sin 
and sorrow were swept and dusted and washed out in the 
corners. Pacific Grove is a great blessing to California. It 
is a nice, quiet meeting place for old ladies (male and fe- 
male) with more ideas than brains. I believe in the isola- 
tion of vice, small-pos and the W. C. T. TJ. 

Senor Felipe Buencamino, a statesman from the water- 
cure belt of the Philippines, is In town, and is very enthu- 
siastic over the free and equal American Government. He 
did not have a chance to see much free and equal American 
Government in the water-cure belt, so I am glad that he has 
come among us to be enlightened. Signor B is so im- 
pressed by our benevolence, and the benevolence of our 
Government, that his emotion is something pathetic to be- 
hold. "America," he concludes, "is keeping the Philip- 
pines for the good of the Filipinos." How nice of you, 
Senor. If the world were full of people like you we would 
own the whole thing and begin bridging for Mars. Now, 
go back to your people — that's a good boy — and tell them 
not to fuss and stew over their kerosene and water gargle. 
It's for their own good, and is being administered in a spirit 
of benevolence. 

Tracey is now newspaper-dead. 

Behold his epitaph: 
The last week's horror of a page 

Is now a paragraph. 

Mrs. Gleeson, of Salt Lake, is a tender, shrinking young 
thing, and that is what got her into trouble. She dropped 
Into San Francisco, did some shopping, and in her shy, un- 
obtrusive way, went into a fashionable restaurant for din- 
ner. There was a young man at the same table who made 
advances toward her, and Mrs. Gleeson, being, as I said, 
shy and shrinking, didn't have the heart to repulse him, 
but talked back in her modest, diffident way. Then when the 
young man wanted to accompany her from the restaurant 
she couldn't refuse — it had been so kind of him to speak 
to a poor lone woman. After they were outside he stole 
$500 from her. Bad. bad young man, to steal $500 from Mrs. 
Gleeson, who, being shy and confiding, didn't know it was 
very unwise to speak to strange young men In public restau- 
rants. 



August 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCI8C0 NEWS LETTER. 



17 



Soul versus Stomach 



Correspondence Between Mary Maclane and Richard Le 
Gallienne. 



By W. J. W. 

The Nev»« Letter hat, without the least bit of Iroub 
expo:: a number of letters that might hav. ; 

between Mary Marian.- ami Mr. Richard l.-- Galll.nne — 
Mary, the apostle of gourmandlsm, who likes her meat raw 
anu dripping, and Richard, to whom wine and great grapes. 
with candled violet petals for dessert, make a satisfying 
and exalting meal. If you wish to know whether or not 
these are genuine letters, write to either Richard of Mary, 
giving your full name and address Bnd enclose stamps: 
My Dear Richard: 

Joy Is In me. The devil, for whom I have longed. Is rag- 
ing my soul, trampling with his cloven hoofs over my 
red heart, jabbing his pointed tail into my eyes and blind- 
ing me to everything but his supreme beauty. Oh, Richard, 
I have just eaten — just eaten, Richard, than which nothing 
could be more divine. I had mush — thick mush with plenty 
of sugar and great gobs of coagulated cream. And I had a 
quart of olives, each one of which, as it went its salty way 
down my superbly beautiful throat, gave me sensations 
enough for pages of copy. I had beer and garlic, too, and 
now 1 am smoking a cigarette. Do you think any of my 
family, whom I hate, would come around me now? 

Rlcnard, if you could only see me, to know for sure how 
beautiful I am! The sun never shone upon anything so di- 
vine, so queenly — and my brilliant mind is the only thing 
that matches my form and face. Ain't I got a nerve? 

O, how I despise my family. The whole damned layout of 
them use tooth brushes. Feverishly, hungrily, 

MARY. 
Dear Mary: 

Why do you reveal the hairy side of your soul to me? 
I always want to think of you as living on hot Montana 
air. and here you are spending your royalties on mush 
and cigarettes — men's cigarettes, too, no doubt. Was it 
oatmeal mush, dearest? O, don't say it was! Tell me, 
rather, that you wrote figuratively when you told me of 
your mush, or at least, that it was made of rose-leaves boilerl 
in dew. Do! 

I dreamed of you last night, dearest one. I dreamed that 
you were a Golden Girl — is it gold or silver they raise in 
Montana? — and that you were sitting on a cloudlet, and I be- 
side you. We were figuring royalties and planning a lec- 
ture tour, except when people went by; then we would hold 
hands and look yearningly into each others' eyes. 

I have just finished combing my hair, love, and I am go- 
ing out into the garden to hear the birdies sing. I think 
I can get dope for about a column. 

Farewell, beloved. My soul is your soul, and your soul 
is my soul, and — there, darn it, I'm all tangled up. If there 
was cash in sight I might finish it. As it is, you can find 
plenty of things near enough like it in any of my books. 
Boost me whenever you get a chance; tell people how 
deuced eccentric I am. Fakily, 

RICHARD. 

DeaT Richard: 

There's the devil to pay. My hated mother and I had a 
dispute as to whether we would have corned beef or kidney 
stew for dinner, and to subdue the wild storm that is rag- 
ing within my tempestuous soul, I have been sticking pins 
through my little brother's ears. 

I could eat a whale fried in its own blubber, Richard, 
with stewed seaweed on the side. O, how hungry I am — 
how I yearn and yearn and yearn for a French dinner. You 
know the French dinners are rotten here. I am going to get 
out of this rank hole, where nobody appreciates me— out 
into the wide world, where there is an opportunity for such 



a genius as I am. I hav.- always wanted to eat a nigger. 
\a~i us go to tht .-. Richard. You milk the cocoa- 

nuts and I'll kill niggers, and Ufa will be a grand and gory 
barbecue. 
• You've no IdM « bat a wonder I am Honest, 1 in a | 
— but not a fuzzy peach. Everybody rubbers at me when I 
walk along the streets, I am so beautiful 

How I long to he wicked- to Just make things slzz. Ami 
how I hate my family — my despised father and mother and 
brothers and sisters, who insist on cooking their meat, and 
do not want me to smoke black cigars. I'm a glutton for 
excitement. Richard. I'm going to put on a pair of spurs 
and go out and ride a steer. I — I — I — I — this letter Is all I. 
and I am the greatest thing that ever warmed the whole 
atmosphere with my presence. For I am Mary MacLane. the 
great Montana meat-eater, whoso stomach always yearns. 
Isn't my book a daisy? If the vulgar public only recog- 
nized my genius as I do I would make enough off of it to 
corner the grub market of the world. 

Strenuously, passionately yours. 

MARY. 



All fruits and vegetables are at Omey & Goetting's, 

stalls 33-34-45-46 California Market, a little sooner, a little 
better and a little fresher than at other places. 



The Social Charm 



In the pride of hospitality the host says: 
I sought the best and now always buy 



Hunter 
Baltimore Rye 




^NTfy 



TRADIISB.iU t-BWHAHK 



rJALTIMORERYE 

,., BOTTLED BY 

Wm.Lanahan&SOH. 



For its uniform 
and refined 



Quality 

Purity 

Flavor 

which never disappoint. 



It is a need to health, 
a comfort and charm 
and eladsome cheer 
of good fellowship. 



CHRISTY & WISE COMMISSION CO., Inc. 

223-225 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 873. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 




Quite a large amount of money has 
« Poor Outlook for been invested in this city within 
Sailing Ships. tie past three or four years Dy pri- 

vate individuals in shipping, and 
large returns have been received upon the investment. Ship- 
yards have been kept busy turning out vessels both steam 
and sail, and the stocks have never been idle. Contracts 
have been let which cannot be filled for months to come, 
and as soon as one craft takes the water, the keel of another 
is laid. Steamers of course are all right as an investment, 
especially when adapted for the lumber and passenger trade. 
They can always be depended upon to find some remunera- 
tive employment when under skilled management. It is 
different, however, with sail, and it begins to look as if the 
business were being overdone in this direction. Large 
fore and afters, barkentines and vessels of this class are 
increasing at a rate which the future of the carrying trade 
from this port does not warrant in face of the constantly in- 
creasing competition with steam. Managing owners naturally 
pride themselves upon having a large and speedy fleet, 
which means of course a heavy investment of outside money. 
The question is now, are they not letting their personal 
feelings get ahead of business prudence? Steamers have 
driven the sailing vessel out of the bulk of the carrying trade 
all over the world, and it is only a matter of a short time 
until they will do the same thing here in freighting to ocean 
ports. Already it is said that steam carriers are cutting 
largely into the business of the sailing fleet from this 
port in the island trade, and the latter is in no way fitted 
to win out if competition ends in a heavy cut in freights. 
Perhaps the managers of sailing ships may have ideas of 
their own of ways and means by which they can turn their 
tonnage afloat to profitable account in the interest of their 
shareholders, but it is difficult for the uninitiated to conceive 
in what direction they will turn for this, as it is to furnish 
reason for these continual additions to the fleet. Given 
the option between steam and sail, an outsider desirous of 
investing in shipping should never hesitate to select the 
former. Barring the ordinary maritime risks, he is then 
comparatively safe, which is more than can be said on the 
other hand. 

Business continues quiet on the local 

The Local Stock Stock and Bond Exchange — very quiet 

Market. indeed in the industrials. Prices rule 

steady, and with no special indication 
of weakness in any particular line of shares. Dealers look 
forward to brighter times following an increased demand 
for investments, as money is plentiful with the class upon 
which the market mainly depends for support. Some trouble 
has been experienced by the managers of the competing 
gas companies, owing to the demands of the employees for 
increased pay. It will end naturally in concessions to the 
men, which will not improve conditions should the price of 
the product continue at its present low figure, or a further 
reduction take place in the rates. Everything continues to 
argue the necessity of some radical changes in the prevailing 
si.uation in favor of shareholders, and if ever a trust could 
«e commended, it would be in the case of these companies 
now engaged in a senseless strife which is simply ruinous 
to all concerned. A favorable opportunity offers in this di- 
rection for some strong-headed manipulators possessed of 
financial ability to organize these badly managed concerns 
and restore order out of chaos. A rumored sale of control 
of the Mutual Electric Light Company is said to have been 



denied officially. This, however, counts for little. Corpora- 
tion officials in this section of the world were never known 
yet to admit anything. Holders of California Fruit Canners 
are very sanguine over the results predicted for the sea- 
son's operations, which it is said will be larger than ever 
before in some special lines. The Alaska Packers Associa- 
tion is also doing weil with their northern canneries run- 
ning full blast. Shareholders in the sugar companies are 
encouraged by the continuance of good reports from the 
Islands, where the plantations are looking exceptionally 
well. Unfortunately low prices for raws still continue which 
accounts for the way prices drag in the share market. There 
are hopes, however, that before long the situation in this 
direction will change for the better. The May financial 
report of the Southern Pacific road shows a surplus of 
?I21,774 over and above all charges. Bonds are in active 
demand as usual, with light offerings. The Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Company has declared the regular quarterly divi- 
dend of $3 per share, payable July 23rd. 

Trading is at a stand-still on Pine 
The Pine-St. Market, street, and the brokers find it 
harder than ever to make ends 
meet. This, however, does not daunt the spirits of the 
unterrified on the curb, who are ready at all times to see 
a silver lining to the darkest cloud that ever draped the 
street in gloom. Con. -Cal. -Virginia still turns out the usual 
average of ore to meet expenses. The new pumps and mo- 
tors to drain the mine to the 2500 level are due to arrive 
on the lode to-day, and then the work of installation will 
begin. Ophir is making money all the time, and shipments 
of ore from the mine continue with unfailing regularity. A 
new hole will be drilled on the Brunswick lode ground owned 
by Potosi. The first has narrowed so by the necessity which 
arose to introduce a casing for the entire depth that it was 
not considered expedient to carry it lower. At the soutn-end 
Caledonia still makes a promising showing. Elsewhere there 
is nothing new reported. 

The International Banking Corporation 
Local Branch of of New York, one of the largest finan- 
Powerful Bank, cial concerns in America, will open a 

branch in this city at Nos. 32-34 San- 
some street on September 2d next. The capital and surplus 
of this wealthy institution paid in aggregates $10,000,000, 
and the Board of Directors consists of men recognized as 
powers in the world of finance. Among them may be men- 
tioned the following well-known names: Messrs. Thomas H. 
Hubbard, James W. Alexander, J. P. Bache, George Crocker, 
Edwin Gould, Isaac Guggenheim, E. H. Harriman, Abram 
S. Hewitt, Joht Hubbard, Alfred G. Vanderbilt, H. E. Hunt- 
ington, James H. Hyde, John B. Jackson, Luther Kountze, 
W. H. Mclntyre, A. W. Paige, and V. P. Snyder. Mr. F. E. 
Beck, for some time past assistant cashier of the Anglo- 
Californian Bank, has been appointed manager of the local 
branch, and P. G. Eastwick, of the Wells, Fargo & Co. bank 
will be cashier. This bank, which is already established in 
London, Manila and Snanghai, with other branches in pro- 
cess of organization, will transact a general banking busi- 
ness, deal in foreign and domestic exchange, issue letters 
of credit on all parts of the world, and loan money. Interest 
will be paid on term deposits. It will be safe to predict an 
active and prosperous career for the International, entering 
the field as it does under such powerful backing and a well- 
trained and popular management. Its position as an influen- 
tial factor in local financial and commercial circles will be 
assured from the moment its doors open for business. 



The appraisers of the Filmore estate have marked as 
"No Value" shares in the following companies: The Ari- 
zona Improvement Company; South Gila Canal Co.; Syca- 
more Oil Company; Automatic Interchangeable Coupler Co.; 
Excelsior Drift Gold Mining Co., and the Carmelita Oil 
Company. 



August 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



AN OBJECTIONABLE DIETARY. 
The mor« one Investigates n,. ,l t h food," 

the more pronnunr.xl bemm<>« UM rnnvlcdon that nummary 
anion should be taken all over the rounlry to put a sinp 
to their manufacture. A rrusanv should be inaugurated at 
once In the Interests of public decency and legitimate in- 
dustry to rout the schemers out of their Individual 
holds and show them up before the public In their true 
light as unprincipled tricksters. The dispensers of the 
so-called "health-food" are simply confidence men of the 
same type as the thimble rigger in the fraternity ,.f gam 
biers. All they desire is to make money out of human . r.-. 
dulity. playing upon the fears and sufferings of hypochro- 
donlcal individuals whose imaginary complaints arc aug- 
mented to the pitch of cruelty, before salvation and relief 
is offered them In the shape of dietary reform. And such 
a diet! The natural grain, from which a saner class derives 
a pure, wholesome and life-supporting produce, is taken for 
manipulation by nauseating methods, its strength eliminated 
by roasting in overheated ovens, doctored with sweetening 
and coloring mixtures, and labeled with catchpenny tttles 
for the weak-minded purchasers, who swallow the nasty 
compound at their peril. Respectable flour millers who 
would scorn the tricks of the fakers, and the money made 
in such a filthy manner, nave already solved the question of 
manufacturing a natural grain product which can be easily 
and safely consumed by persons of the most delicate phy- 
sique. In such breakfast foods as Germea, the modern idea 
is evolved to a stage of perfection by the preservation in 
their entirety of the essentials in grain which conservu to 
the maintenance of vital force in the human system, freed 
from the irritating and mawkish additions which endanger 
the digestive organization of the patrons of health food un- 
der its innumerable aliases. 

In the matter of food supply it always pays to buy the best 
qualities from the best makers. Bread, especially, entering 
as it does so largely into the diet of mankind, should be 
composed of the purest materials. The best make of flour 
is always cheap for this reason, and only the better class 
oi manufacturers should be patronized by those in search 
of health or who desire to retain this chief blessing of hu- 
manity. By adhering to standard brands and plain unadul- 
terated breakfast food of the Germea type, if a gain in 
coarser form is not palatable or desirable, people will fare 
hetter and live longer than by absorbing any of the miser- 
able concoctions now masquerading as 'health foods." One 
and all they are more apt to kill than cure, while in any sense 
of the term they are simply an abomination. 



Transactions on the Producers' Oil Exchange from July 
22nd to 28th: 



STOCKS. SHARKS 

SOLD 

Bear Flag 3,000 

Home 635 

Independence 1,500 

Junction 3 500 

Kern 50 

Uon 2.000 

Monte Cristo 1,550 

Oil City Petroleum 300 

San Joaquin O. <& D. Co 40 

Soverien 3,100 

Tolteo 500 

Twenty Eieht 200 

816,276 



RANGE OF 
PBICES 

7 O ■■ 

3 5 @ 3 25 

4 @ 6 

16 @ 17 

i so m ■■ 

4, ® .. 

1 25 @ .. 

12 @ .. 

7 00 @ .. 

25 @ .. 

20 @ 

1 35 m 1 40 



GROSS 

SALES 

210 

1,631 

80 

646 



775 
100 
275 

16,285 



The Cecilia Choral Society is a new musical organization 
in San Francisco, and will participate in a series of concerts 
to be given monthly by the Mechanics' Institute. An Ora- 
torio will be given twice a year, "Messiah" having been 
chosen for presentation during the Christmas season. Mr. 
C. Harding Tebbs, 26 O'Farrell street, is the secretary of the 
Cecilia Choral Society. 



No danger of a bad complexion if you use Camelline, 

which is a perfect protective from the wind and sun. It is 
used and endorsed by Mrs. Terry, Mrs. Kendall, Adelina 
Patti and others. 




— THE — 

Berlitz School of Languages 

139 POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

All laneuftccs lauirlit by the- Berlitz Method, tha beit And quickest ever 
ftcvf-e<l. Competent native toachtrt. frivrtte nml ehis.i instruction. Nearly 
200 branches, with 75,000 students In the principal cities ot America and 
Europe, 

2 gold and 2 silver medal fl »t Paris SxpOSl inn. 

Trial lesson free on application lo secretary. I ommerclal classes. Send 
for catalogue. 

College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic. Full college 
course of studies. Modern building; steam heated. 
Unsurpassed beauty and healthfulness. Address, 

Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael, Cal. 
Christmas Term Begin* Augusl 4. 



Hamlin School 



And Van Ness Seminary. 

1849 JACKSON ST. COR. GOUGH. S. F- 
Boarding and day aohool for girls. Accredited by the Universities o 
California and Leland Stanfo d Jr.. also by Vassar. Sm'th, and Welles" 
ley Colleges. 

SARAH D. HAMLIN. Principal. 

Feralta Hall 

School for boys. Berkeley, Cal Next 
term opens July 28th. 

Phone Mason 1387, 

FRANCIS DUNN, Principal. 

Hitchcock Military Academy 

SAN R«FAEL CAL. 

XmasTerm Will Begin August 18th. 



The Lyceum 



An accredited preparatory school for the u'dversii y, law and med- 
ical colleges: reference", PreBident lordnn or any Stanford pro- 
fessor. Phelan Bldg, L. H. Grau, Ph. D., Piincipal. 



BEST' ART SCHOOL 



Lessons In Painting, Drawing, Sketching, and Illustrating 
Life classes. $3.00 per month. 

927 MARKET STREET, 



DR. H. d. STEWART 



Teacher of Vocal Music, Piano, Organ Harmony 
and Composition. 

Special course for singers desiring church 
positions, 

STUDIO: 1105 BUSH STREET 



C. H. REHNSTROM 

[(Successor to Sanders & Johnson.) 

TAILOR 

Phelan Bldfl.Tel- Main 5387 San Francisco, Gal. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 




VIOLIN-MOODS. 

( Robert Haven S hafllerin Soiibnevs.) 
To-day the sense of Spring fills all my frame 

And, thrilling, stirs and throbs in me as when 
The sap began to course like liquid flame 

In March, in my old tree-home, far from men. 

And now my song grows free and clear again. 
And full of vibrant, vernal murmuring — 

Re-echoing bird-notes out of brake and fen, 
That tell of youth and young love on the wing 
And all the thousand, joyous mysteries of Spring. 

As all the sensuous body of the mere 

Swerves to the influent moon; as rhyme sways 
rhyme, 
I feel the bounding pulses of the year, 

In all the boundless vigor of her prime. 

Beat in her forest-ocean. On a time 
The warm, rich life of summer surged in mc 

And still my finer spirit-senses chime 
With subtle instincts of that soul-less tree 
And all the mystic power that moves the summer sea. 



WIND ON THE MOUNTAIN. 

^Joseph Russell Taylor in S -Tlbner'p.) 

Suddenly fallen in blue enchanted weather, 

Like a sea at its highest heave and farthest run, 

Blue beyond blue, asleep, in the wind and sun, 

The mountains! Here, with only our arms for tether. 

In the rose-heaped laurel and ankle-deep in the heather, 

With the wind on the mountain are we o'er a world at 

rest, 
The wind on your wild-skirts binding us breast to breast, 
Blowing your hair in my face as we cling together, 
^aose in my arms' If now at the wind's wild prime 
If we should be snatched on the wind's wild wildest 

sweep, 
Snatched and whirled and blown as light as a feather. 
Up and away from our bride-bloomed summit of time. 
Out and afar where the peaks of eternity sleep, 
We may vanish at least and fall at the last together. 



HOMESICKNESS. 
(Kthelwyn Wetheraldin Kew Knirlnnn Moeazine.) 

At twilight on this unfamiliar street. 

With its affronts to aching ear and eye, 
I think of restful ease in fields that lie 

Untrodden by a myriad fevered feet. 

green and dew and stillness! O retreat 
Thick-leaved and squirrel-haunted! By and by 
I too shall follow all the thoughts that fly 

Bird-like to you, and find you, ah. how sweet! 

Not yet — not yet! To-night it almost seems 
That I am speeding up the hemlock lane. 

Up to the door, the lamp, the face that pales. 
And warms with sudden joy. But these are dreams. 

1 lean on Memory's breast, and she is fain 

To soothe my yearnings with her tender tales. 



IN THE REDWOODS. 



(A. TX Norilbnirin Scrihner'H ) 

As in some vast cathedral, one looks up 
Through columns, carved and tinted deep by time. 
Up, up to where the light grows faint: and where 
Through windows, made by dust of ages dim 
A few pale sunbeams strive to force their way; 
So in the redwoods. Midst the columns vast 
Of nature's great cathedral, gazing up 
One finds the same dim distance and the same 
Pale sunbeam and the same dim. far-off light: 
But in the place of windows, filmed by time, 
Great interlacing branches, tier on tier. 
Set in a frame-work of the fern-like leaf: 
And in between, faint glimpses of deep blue. 
As if some master-hand, with earnest touch. 
Had painted every space, 'twist leaf and branch. 
With tender color, like the Heaven's own. 



BANKING. 

London and San Francisco Bank, united 

424 OAIJFORNIA STREET. 
HEAD OFFICE— 55 Old Broad street, London. 



Capital Authorized. 12,500.000. 



Capital Paid Up. tl.400,000. 



Directors — Henry Goschen, Chairman, London; Christian de Gulgne, 
San Francisco; Charles Hemery, London; John L. Howard, San Fran- 
cisco; Bendlx Koppel, London; Greville Hoosley Palmer, London; Norman 
D. Rldeout, San Francisco; Arthur Scrivener, London. 
Agents In New York, Messrs. J. P. Morgan A Co. 
BRANCHES: Portland. Oregon; Tacoma, Wash., Seattle, Wash- 
Letters ol oredlt Issued available for travelers and the purchase of mer- 
chandise In any city of the world. Deal In foreign and domestic excha nge 
Accounts of country banks received. Terms on application. 
A. L. Black. Cashier W. Mackintosh, Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which la amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toronto. 

Paid Up Capital. 88,000.000. Reserve Fund, 92,000,000. 

Aggregate Resources over 970.000.000- 

Hon- Geo- A- Cox. President; B- E. Walker, General Manager. 

J. H. Plummer, Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE— CO Lombard St-.E- C, S. Cameron Alexander, Manager 

NEW YORKOFFIOE— 16 Exchange Place. Alex. Laird and Wm- Gray. 

Agents. 
ONTARIO: 44 BRANCHES- 

Quebec: Montreal; Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon District 
Dawson, White Horse; British Columbia: Atlln, Cranbrook, Fernle 
Greenwood, Kamloops. Nanatmo. Nelson, New Westminster, San don, 
Vanoouver, Viotoria. In the United States — New York, N. Y. San Fran- 
clsoo, Cal- Seattle, Wash- Portland, Ore- Skagway, Alaska- 
Bankers in London— The Bank of Scotland: Messrs- Smith, Payne A Smiths 
Bankers in New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents In Chicago— The Northern Trust Company. Agents in New Orleans ■ 
— The Commercial National Bank. 
San Franelsoo Office; Walter Powell. Manager. A. Kalns. Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cos. Sansomb and Suttbk Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 92,600.000 Pald-Up Capital, fQ.000.000 

Reserve Fund, 91,050.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. 0. 

AGENTS: New York— Agenoy of the London, Paris and American Bank. 

Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres A Cle. 17 

Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

PTG. GREENEBATTM. Manager. 
H. T. fl. GREEN. Sub-Manager- 
R. ALT80HUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Sansome and Pine Sts., San Franolsoo 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe. Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL 9600.000. 

SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. 9147.000. 

DEREOTORS— James K. Wilson, Wm. J Dutton.Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pleroe, O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York-Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Shawmut Bank ; Philadel- 
phia— Drexel A Co.: Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Loud- — The 
Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London — Brown. 
Brown. Shipley A Co. Paris— Morgan. Harjes A Co. Denver— Natloual 
Bank of Commerce- Johannesburg — Robinson South African Bank'g Co - 
Ltd. 

Germania 1 rust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital. 91,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, 9450.000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of Individuals, Arms, and corporations solicited. 
Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Intkhebt 

r AID ON TBTT8T DEPOSITS AND HAYINGS. INVESTMENTS carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg. President: W. A. Frederick, Vice-President; H. 
Brunner. Cashier; J. C. Rued, Trust Officer. 

Board of Auditors— A. G. Wleland. Geo- W. Bauer and J- C. Rued. 

Board of Directors — F. Kronenberg, Fred A. Kuhle. Fred Woerner. W. A. 
Frederick, F. C. Siebe. John Rapp, Walter M. Wlllett and Herman L. E. 
M*»yer, E. A. Denlckc. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. O. 

Capital Authorized 96.000.000 Paid Up 91,600,000 

Subscribed 8,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. A W. Sellgman A Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of oredlt available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEDfHAST. P. N. LlLLENTHAL. Managers. 

Securty Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St Mills Building 



NTEBEST PAID ON DEPOSITS. 

William Alvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 

8. L. Abbot. Jr. 
O. D. P»ldw1p 
F. Monteagle 



. H, newlett 
J. McCutchcn 
R. H. Pease 



August 2. 1902. 



• AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



'Truth" Decries Buffoonery 



Says that "iconoclast" has been making fun of him, and 
that this, together with his views on Admiral Dewey, 
brands him as a traitor and no gentleman. 

Editor News Letter Ii.ar Sir: It seems a pity to drag the 
name of Admiral GeorK' 1 Dewey, for whom the people of San 
Francisco arc erecting a beautiful monument, Into 
communications as that consummate ass, "Iconoclast." lias 
-ending to you. Your good nature must bo uulimited, 
sir, that you will permit this idiotic scoffer to assail the 
good name of our greatest naval hero, drag bis reputation 
in the mud, and spit his venom at a respectable citizen like 
myself. This boorish vulgarian, without any sense of 
decency, defiles everything he writes. More than that, 
he descends to clowning. A friend has asserted that in 
many of his passages this brainless upstart is poking fun 
at me. I will have to take my friend's word for it, as my 
mind refuses to comprehend the meaning or import of buf- 
foonery. I, sir, have been writing on this subject in a seri- 
ous vein, and If it is true that this dirty nincompoop lias 
added to the offense of becoming personal that of poking 
fun at a serious man's honestly expressed opinions, I can 
only say that he has shown very bad taste, to say the 
least. 

I repeat and I reiterate that a gentleman will not snore 
— neither will a gentleman assert that even a bronze lady 
will look at the horrible sights nightly witnessed, so I 
am told, in our French restaurants. 

Really, sir, I have no words to express my contempt for 
this loathsome, crawling reptile, this illiterate, vulgar, 
scoffing ignoramus, who cannot conduct an argument on 
a matter of public import without becoming personal, and 
making a clown of himself. I would scorn to write of him, 
only I feel that it is my solemn duty to defend the good 
name of our great Admiral, and to punish as far as my 
feeble pen will allow me this venomous snake. Iconoclast. 

As to the nurses, sandwich men, policemen and loungers 
to whom he refers, I am willing to wager that any one of 
them has more brains than has this thick-headed degener- 
ate, who can neither be decent nor respect those who are. 
Hoping that this will silence this thing, Iconoclast, forever. 
I am, sir, Very truly yours, 

"TRUTH." 



BANKING. 

Wells, Fargo & Co. Bank 



Charles M. Shubert, whose wife is suing him for divorce 
because of cruelty, is not only a brute but a very unwise 
one. During their honeymoon he slapped her face in pub- 
lic, called her vile names and threw a lighted cigar in her 
face. Schubert was very undiplomatic. A young wife 
should be broken in more gradually. If he had contented 
himself with merely cuffing her during the honeymoon 
he might have gradually trained her so that by this time 
he could not only throw lighted cigars in her face, but 
burn sulphur matches under her nose and kick her arouud 
the house, without raising a protest. As it is he has spoiled 
her by being too eager to assert his rightful mastery. 



Smartest Train of All. 
Sunset Limited for New Orleans and New York resumed 
tri-weekly service from San Francisco on December 6th. 
Equipment will be the very best obtainable; the service of 
the snappiest order, while the route affords the most inter- 
es' nc winter journey across the continent. 

Carpet stores would make less money if all people 

(had their carpets cleaned at Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning 
Works, 353 Tehama street. An occasional thorough clean- 
ing adds to the life of a carpet, and it cannot he done better 
than by Spaulding's modern methods. They call for and 
deliver goods and do work promptly. 

Tesla Briquettes are sold direct from the mine and 

factory for $6.00 per ton. Use Briquettes for cooking and 
heating, and you'll save at least one-third on your fuel bill. 
Phone Tesla Coal Co., South 95, and your order will receive 
prompt attention. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



* *i-ltnl, Surplus, and Undivided 1 to «ai 2U2I 
KoflU.JuIy31.lWI. J ?VDi,«u.«, 

IM I'I.kt Evans. Acting President; Homer 8. Kino. Manager- II. Wadd- 
worth Cashier; K.I,. Lipmak. A sat. Cabhikr; II. L. Millkr. Ami. Cashier. 

BBASnirj-Kew York ; Salt Lake. Utah: Portland. Or. 

Correspondent* throughout the World. General Banking business tran- 



San Francisco Savings Union 



532 CALIFORNIA STREET. S. F, 

Deposits July, 1. 1902.. IS0..194.392 Reserve Fund 1135.170 

Paid-up Capital 1.000.000 Contingent Fund 53.711 

E. B. P O ND. Pres ident W. O. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen. Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery. O. O 
G. MlHer. Robert Watt. George C. Boardman. Daniel E. Martin. Jaoob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and fanning 
landsln the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in oheoks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo A Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

The Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 12.000.000- 

Surplus, •1,000,000. 

Undivided Profits, July 1. 1902. •3,027,997.88. 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President | THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

CHAULESR. BISHOP Vice-Pres't I. F. MOULTON Ass't Cashier 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary I SAM H. DANIELS Ass't Cashlei 

CORRESPONDENTS 
New York— Messrs. Laldlaw A Co.: the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank ; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis — Boatmen's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nov. — Agency of The Bank of California. London — Messrs. 
N. M. Rothschild A Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellsohaft. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 
Letters of credit issued, available In all parts of the world. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus (2,347 .387.58 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1.000 000.00 

Deposits June SO. 1902 31.698.792.56 

BOAKD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker: First Vice-President 
John Lloyd: Second Vice-PreBldent, Daniel Meyer. 

H. Horstmann, Ign. SMnhart, H. B. Rues. Emll Rohte, N, Ohlandt, and 
I. N. Walter. 

Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Sec- 
retary. George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attor- 
ney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hoofer, Vice-PreBldent 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MoElroy, Oh as. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald* Charles Hoi brook: 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on a pp roved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co.. or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital, .$12.000, 000 Profit and Reserve Fund... •250,000 
Pald-ln-Oapltal 2,000,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 8 to 12 per cent, per annum on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 
per cent, per annum. 

Home Office— S. W. Cor. California and Battery Streets, Ran Francisco 

Wm. Corbin, General Manager 

Crocker- Wool worth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Stb. 

Paid-up-Capital 91,000 000 

Wm, H. Orooxbh, President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

C. E. Grbbn, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant C&shiei 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B Pond. George Crocker. C. E. Green. G. W, 
Henry Kline. T. Scott, G, W. Scott 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 19C2. 




A change is impending in a local agency on the street 
which is not definitely concluded at the present writing. 

* ■ ■ 

Vacationing: Mr. J. G. Conrad, of Voss Conrad; Colonel 
William Sexton of the Fireman's Fund; Mr. T. J. Conroy of 
the Manchester. Returned to the city: Mr. E. E. Potter from 
the East; Mr. F. W. Tallant of the London; and Mr. Fred 
Bennion of the Equitable Life. 

* * * 

If you see a manager who looks pale and out of condition, 
who sees nothing in the future but a dismal big gob of fail- 
ure and loss of business, it is more than probable that he has 
been reading the works of Mr. P. B. Armstrong, and is suffer- 
ing from Armstrongitis. 

* * * 

The Electrical Bureau of the National Board of Fire 
Underwriters has just made its regular quarterly re- 
port. Electricity is charged with thirty-seven fires, which 
are directly traceable to this cause. The greatest 
loss entailed in any single fire of the thirty-seven was 
$35,000. Among other interesting items th© report shows: 
Sixteen reports of loss by lightning were received in which 
the lightning followed telephone or lighting wires into the 
buildings. Six pole and tree fires were reported. In one cas? 
a limb of a tree after being burned off by contact with a 
primary wire, fell and crossed the primary with the sec- 
ondary wires, sending high potential current at 2,300 volts 
inio three dwellings, in eaca of which fires were started. 
The usual large number of fires and burnouts due to crosses 
between telephone ana high tension wires is noted. Of these 
crosses, eleven were found on lighting wires and four on 
trolley wires. The most common cases of the grounding 
of circuits as reported during the last quarter are as fol- 
lows: Fixture wires grounded on gas pipes. Feeder wires 
grounded under sidewalks. Service switches grounded on 
outside walls. Contact of wires with awnings and metal 
work on buildings. Seven fires are attributed to the over- 
heating resistance coils and heating devices; 1 by an electric 
smoothing iron. 1 starting from a heater, 1 from a drop light 
left on a wooden seat, and 4 from resistance coils in the rheo- 
stats. Two fires are reported due to the burnout of motors, 
one from an electric fan and two from incandescent arc 
lamps. Two instances are noticed of crosses in dwellings 
between battery circuits and lighting wires. Under the head 
of casualties the report says: A wire which had been thrown 
over an electric light wire (3,000 volts) had its end tied 
around a tree in a private yard and made contact with a 
wire cable used for a swing. The owner of the premises, 
in attempting to remove the wire, grasped the swing cable 
and was instantly killed. A wireman fell from a pole as .»e 
result of a shock from a 1,000-volt alternating circuit and 
was severely injured. 

* * • 

The Minnesota Mutual Life is to enter California. Ex- 
Insurance Commissioner of Minnesota J. A. O'Shaughnessy, 
who is president of the company, is in the city personally 
making the arrangements. 

• * * 

Mr. A. L. Vorys, Insurance Commissioner of Ohio, gives 
the following synopsis of the life business in Ohio: The total 
number of policies of all kinds, which includes industrial 
business, written in Ohio by the forty-six regular life com- 
panies in 1901 was 352,778 policies carrying $116,011,935.63 
of insurance, as compared with 332,888 policies amounting to 
$108,709,234.38 of insurance in 1900. Of this number and 



amount, the four Ohio companies wrote 102,868 policies, car- 
rying 17,696,607 of insurance as compared with 95,044 poli- 
cies amounting to $14,012,v 11 in 1900. All companies ter- 
minated 240,271 policies carrying $69,406,329,84 of insurance 
during the year. The ratio of policies terminated to poli- 
cies issued being 68 per cent, and L-.e ratio of insurance ter- 
minated to insurance written is 59.8 per cent. 

• * * 

Mr. Frederick C. Buswell has been elected second vice- 
president of the Home File of New York, and Mr. E. H. A. 
Correa third vice-president. These two gentlemen were ap- 
pointed assistant secretaries of the company in 1898, and 
have won their promotion by their merit. Mr. Correa is, 
owing to the many times he has visited this city, well and 
favorably known to the San Francisco underwriters. 

• * * 

Total losses by fire in Chicago for the first six months of 
this year approximate $2,770,000. The premiums show a 
deficit for the same time of $250,000. God knows how the 
year will end in the profit and loss account. 

• • * 

Supervisor Brandenstein has submitted an ordinance to 
the Board of Supervisors providing for presenting to the 
peopie an amendment to the Charter which shall place the 
Fire Department under the management of one commis- 
sioner instead of a board of four. More politics, and these of 
an undesirable kind. ban Francisco's fire department is 
now in first-class shape, and it is to be regretted that any 
attempts at tinkering with it should be allowed. 

• • * 

The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company has 
elected the following trustees: Mr. Willard Merrill, Judge C. 
F. Dyer, Mr. H. F. Whitcomb, Mr. F. F. Adams, Milwaukee; 
Jesse Spaulding, Chicago; Mr. J. H. Millard, Omaha; Mr. T. 
C. Lawler, Dubuque, and Mr. John Field, Philadelphia. The 
board of trustees re-elected the old officers of the company, 
and all the world pauses aghast, wondering where Mr. Clar- 
ence M. Smith, the Company's California General Manager, 

gets off. 

• • • 

The Merchants' of Newark has been reinsured in the Na- 
tional. The company was organized in 1858. Paid-up capital 
stock of $400,000 and gross assets of $1,230.33. 

• • • 

The report that Deputy Insurance Commissioner Rohrer 
was to lose his position was premature, and came just 
about as near the truth as the daily press ever does when 
discussing matters pertaining to insurance. 

• • * 

The Guardian will in future be known as "The Guardian 
Assurance Company. Limited." It has dropped the words 
"Fire and Life" out of its title. 

• • • 

London, with 2,000,000 more population than New York, 
had only 3.6oi fires in 1901, while New York had 8,504. The 
difference in the rate of burning property in the two cities 
explains the difference in rates for fire insurance. 



Southfield Wellington Coal 
with which cook can please all. 



J. O. Habeon, 
Thos. Rickabd, 
Vice-President 



Pres.. ) 
l, 1st. (- 
int ) 



„, „„„,„ .. f A. J. McConb, 2nd Vloe 

Formerly ol J i»_„i;, ... i n 

Parke & Lacy Co. (^ 



President. O 
Fulton Fd'r.VlretnlaClty 



HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE 

21 AND 23 FREMONT STREET. 

and 

Supplies 



nining flachinery 



Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 



August 2. 1902. 



8AN FRANUSCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



ART IN HOME FURNISHING. 

Ai San Francisco outgrows hi r youth, and us families 
became permanent here Instead of transit. u> .* -i !••» v ars 
ago. the demand for things that will beautify the homo Ill- 
lea, as does also the taste In selecting Qtttag ■ 
There Is less of the haphazard selection than formerly. 
More care Is taken, and everything is chosen, nol only with 
regard for its own biau.y ami worth, but with a thought 
as to Its harmony with its surroundings. This development 
in taste has encouraged dealers to place the best in the 
world on our market. No hitter instance of this can be 
found than at the store of the P. Rossi Company, which 
is now entirely controlled by the senior member of the 
former firm, and will continue to cater to the art loving 
people of San Francisco. 

The strides made by Mr. Rossi are due entirely to his 
taste in selecting furniture, bronzes, brasses, marble stat- 
ues, bric-a-brac, etc. He has made his store unique — a 
veritable treasure house, and a delight to art-lovers. Both 
the modern and the antique schools are represented, and 
nothing is placed on sale that is not perfect. Mr. Rossi 
himself specially designs many of the pieces, and the 
Rossi factories in both Paris and Vienna are kept busy 
turning out articles from models made by him and by other 
noted artists in this line. Then he has numerous agents 
in Europe, who are constantly on the lookout for the rarest 
in antiques and bric-a-brac. In this way the best things 
in Europe reach San Francisco, and our people are given 
an opportunity to purchase articles that are fit adornment 
for any home. Such a firm as the P. Rossi Company does 
much to perpetuate art. The success achieved is deserved. 



Allen's Press Clippinf Bureau have moved to the 

rooms formerly occupied by Bradstreets, at 230 California 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Mothers, be sure and use "MrB. Win3low's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



•'IRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $4,000,000 



Northern Assurance Company. 

OF LONDON ^fSS^X AND ABERDEEN 



Cash Assets 

$20,000,000 

221 Saneome Street, 




Geo. F. Grant 
Manager 

San Francisco. 



Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

(Incorporated by the State of New York.) 
Assets, over J74,000,000. Liabilities, $64,000,000 

Surplus, over $9,000,000. 
Tssues policies for all approved forms of insurance; adapted to 
all stations and circumstances of life. Policies are free from re- 
strictions as to travel and residence; are clear, concise business 
contracts, and conditions are plain and simple and easily under- 

■ t00<s - „ ... 

Pacific Coast head office: Hayward Building, corner Califor- 
nia and Montgomery streets, San Francisco. Home Office— New 
York City. 

John R.- Hegeman, President; Haley Flske, Vice-President; 
Geo. H. Gaston. Second Vice-President; Geo. B. Woodward, 
Third Vice-President; James S. Roberts, Secretary; Thornton R. 
Richardson, Assistant Secretary; A. S. Knight, Medical Direc- 
tor; Thomas H. Wlllard, Medical Director; Eugene M. Holden, 
Assistant Medical Director. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany. 



N. Schleislnger, City Agent. 



304 Montgomery St, S. F. 




INSURANCE. 

MARtro: PKP Airr. 'i' Kj ra 

M*J & Ml 1'VIDMt |Vj 

bmmsbmbi ■ nmm > ..**.- ('rt.'il«l H 1 1 1 -scribed $4,4.92,750 

LONDON ASSURANCE. ">"»'>> >-»'■' o» * 2:2*1. 3ts 

Assets 19,196,145 

■utrftu ■■■■■up Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

OCEAN MARINE Capital Paid Up SOO.OOO 

Assets. 2,502.060 

Founded A. D. 1792 

Insurance Uompany of / lorth America 

OP PHILADELPHIA. PKNN. 

Paid-up Capital J3.O00.OO0 

Surplus to Policy Holders J6.022.018 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California St., S. F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D., 1720. 

Capital Paid Up, J3.446.100. Assets, J24.662.043.35 

Surplus to Policy Hldrs, J8,930,431.41. Losses Paid, over H84.000.000 

PACIFIC COAST BRANCH; 

601 Montgomery Street. 
FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager 
HERMANN NATHAN b PAUL F. KINGSTON, Looal Manaeers. 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New* Zealand Insurance Gompany 

OF Nbw Zealand 
Capital, 16,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street. 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager. 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD. Established 1860. 

Cash Capital J1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets : 4,318,611.00 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,008,423.00 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager Pacific Dept.. 
COLIN M. BOYD, Agent for San Francisco, 4J1 California St. 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London Limited 

_ Established 1782. 

Pelican Assurance Company, of New York 
Providence Washington Ins. Co., of Rhode Is. 

BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents, 418 California St., 8. F. 



British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) of Liverpool. 

Capital J67,000,000 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Agents. 316 California St., S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT, Germany 

Capital, $2,250,000. Assets, $10,984,248. 

Voss, Conrad & Co., General Manager. 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome St, S. F. 



PALATINE 



OF LONDON, ENGLAND 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

C F- MULLTNS. Manager.: 416-418 California street, S. F. 
FIBE INSURANCE 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 




Highland Springs 



ALWAYS OPEN 

The famous health and pleasure resort of lake County. Fin- 
est waters for the cure of Liver, Kidney, Malaria, Rheuma- 
tism and Stomach Troubles. Every comfort and amusement. 
Free swimming tank. Croquet, Tennis. Regulation bowling 
alley. Riding and driving horses. Splendid Trips to moun- 
tains or valley. 

NOTE SPECIAL RATES: 



One person In room, 
Two persons in room, 
One person In room, ' 
Two persons in room, 
One person In room. 
Two persons In room, 



"small hotel,' $10.00 per week. 

"small hotel," $18.00 per week. 
cottages," $11.00 per week. 

"cottages," $20.00 per week. 
'Main Hotel." $12 and $14 per week. 
'Main Hotel," $20.00 and $22.00 per week 



Special inducements for school teachers or families desiring 
to remain by the month. 

For descriptive circulars and analysis of the waters call on 
The Tourist Information Bureau, 10 Montgomery street, or 
the Traveler Office, 20 Montgomery street, or write direct to 
Craig & Warner, Managers, Highland Springs, Lake County, 
California. 



Anderson Springs 



Only natural Mineral Steam 
Baths in Lake County 

14 distinct mineral springs of 8 different characters, hot and 
cold, Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. Board: $10 to $14 per 
week. Baths free. Address J. ANDERSON, Anderson 
Springs, Middletown, Lake County, California. 



Fare— San Francisco to Sprints and return reduced to S 
lar. Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5% Kearny St., 



. Send for clrcu- 
San Francisco. 



Agua Caliente Springs 



AI-o Known as 
California Hot Springs 
Quaintly Bituated, Burrounded by mountains and woodland, and consist- 
ing; of three different hot springs. Reached directly by trains of the Cali- 
fornia Northwestern Railway or those of the Southern Pacific Santa Rosa 
Line, (no staging) New Hotel, equipped with modern Improvements, ac- 
commodating 200 guests, Swimming Bath, private Bath, Ball Room, Mu»ic, 
Livery, fine Drives Teonis Court; Rate. $2 and $2.50 » Day ; $13 and t\4 a 
week. Special terms for Families Send lor illustrated booklet. Theodore 
Richards, Agua Caliente, Sonoma County. Cal, The Half-Fare Sunday Ex- 
cursions on the California Northwestern Railway enabe visitors to spend a 
day at the Springs, returning to the City on the same evening. 



Byron 

Hot 

Springs 

Contra Costa Co. 
CAL. 



A SANITARIUM AND RESORT 

The new hotel is the finest on the Coast. Elegantly 
furnished rooms and suites with private mineral 
baths- All modern improvements for comfort and 
safety. Excellent cuisine and an air of home com- 
fort. Rheumatism and Malaria yield quickly to 
these wonderful waters and baths. 

Address Manager Lewis, Byron Hot Springs, Cal, 
Call on Lombard & Co., 36 Geary Street, S. F. 



Hotel El Monte 



LOS GATOS 

Under new management. Five minutes from depot. Now 
open for business. Table unsurpassed. 

RATES $8 to $15 Per Week. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM. 

Thoroughly equipped with all modern appliances. X-ray. All 
forms water treatment, the finest Static Galvanic sinusoidal and 
Faradic Electrical apparatus. A corps of well-trained nurses or 
both sexes skilled in all forms of treatments and manlpulatlons- 

Rest cure scientifically carried out A quiet, home-like place 

beautiful scenery. Mt. Hamilton and the famous Lick Observa- 
tory in plain view; one block from electric cars; fifteen minutes 
walk from the center of the city. Terms: $10 to $20 per week, 
including medical attention and regular treatment. 

Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jote, Cal. 



The Geysers 



One of the wonders of 
the world 



New Management. Newly furnished. Rooms hard finished- 
First Class Table. Meals a la Carte. Dairy and Vegetable 
ftarden. New Ba'h Houses. Electric Light. Swimming 
Pool. Twenty miles of the best fishing streams. Hunting. 



RATES— $10, 12" 14. 



FABIU8 FERATJD. Lessee and Manager 



BEAUTirUL 



Laurel Dell 



THE ORIGINAL SWIT ZER- 
LAND OF AMERICA. 



The World Famous Ford Concert and Vaudeville Company 
now at Beautiful Laurel Dell for the entire season. Ten people; 
all artists. New music and songs. 

Croquet, Tennis, bowling; New livery, all kinds of turnouts; 
15 kinds of mineral waters ; free Tally-ho coach to springs daily 
free to guests. Pamphlet at C. N. W. R. R. Office or 

E. DTJRNAN, 
Laurel Dell, Lake Co., Cal. 



Blue 



New launches ana 



BOATING, BATHING. FISHING AND HUNTING, 
boali. Tennis court and a]] other amusements. 

flEDICAL SPRINGS 

Our famous "White Sulphue" Springs. Hot and Cold Baths, and eto. 
Send lor new pamphlet. O WEISMAN, Midlaka P. O.. Lake Co , Cal. 

or call at otHce ol C. N. W. W. R. R. Co., 650 Market Street. 



Lakes 



Hotel Benvenue and cottages 

LAKE PORT, CAL. 

LAKEPORT'S SUMMER RESORT. Situated overlooking the 
shore on Clear Lake. New pavilion, boat-house, and bowling alley. 
Open all the year. Special facilities for accommodating families 
with children; home cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and super- 
ior fishing. Lovely drives and walks. New sanitary plumbing. 
Modern improvements. Re-furnished, re-decorated. Rates: $8, 
$10, $12 per week. Special rates to families. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



Skaggs 



HOT SPRINGS. Sonoma County; only 4% 
hour! from S. F.. and but 9 miles staging; 
waters noted for medicinal virtues; beat 
natural hot mineral water bath in State; 
boating: and swimming in 'Warm Spring 
Creek; good trout streams; telephone, telegraph, dally mail, express, and 
8. F. mornlnc and evening papers. First-class Hotel and Stage Service. 
Both morning and afternoon itages; round trip from S. F. only tS.tO. Take 
Tlburon Ferry at 7:3U a. m. or 3.30 p. m. Sundays, 8 a. m. only. Rates, tS a 
day or $12 a week. References: Any guest of the past seven years. Pa- 
tronage of 1901 unprecedented. J. F. MULGREW, Skaggs. Cal. 

Congress Springs. 

A charmlne resort in the Santa Cruz Mountains; 2 hours from Sat. 
Francisco; delightful climate: swimming and all Bports: table 
unsurpassed: best mineral water on the coast: open all the year. 
E. H. GOODMAN, Manager. 



WISDOM CONSISTS in doing the right thing at the right 

time. 
WE ARE ALL WISE— afterwards— when It is too late. 
THE TIME to take care of your health is when you have it. 
NEVER ALLOW yourself to get into a rut or a groove, 

either physically or mentally. 
LREAK the monotony that makes so many men and women 

old long before their time. 
TAKE an occasional trip. 

THE COUNTRY along the California Northwestern Railway 
is not the only place to visit, but it certainly la the best 
ITS LOCATION between the coast and the interior affords 

that salubrious climate which invites living in the 

open air, and Alls up the system with renewed energy. 
CALL or write for 

" VACATION. 1902," 

A little book issued by the California Northwestern Rail- 
way Company, (The Picturesque Route of California) giv- 
ing Camping Locations, Hotels, Mineral Spring Resorts, 
and a long list of Country Homes where board for the Sum- 
mer can be secured at from $6.00 to $8.00 per week. 

Ticket Offices. 650 Market St., (Chronicle Building-) and Tlburon Ferry, foot 

of Market St. General Oflice Mutual Life Bulldine. Sansome 

and California Sta. San Franolsoo. 

H. C. WHITING Gen'l. Manager B. X. RYAN.Q.n'l. Paas. Act 



Augurt 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



OBHUARY. 

Another of ttM States greatest attorneys has paasod away 
in the parson ol Van It. 1'aterson. who died In San I ra 
last Sunday at the age o( from liror 

lint, from which he lia<l I...11 suffering for thi 
six months. 

Juiu ii was a native of Nan York, where he was 

born In IMS. lie graduated from the Albany Norms 

■ 1 1*7::. sod rabseqiienU; took the degree ol l.l.. B. in 
I nion College. Although educated In the East, he began his 
law career In Stockton, California. He was wry successful, 
ami was elected City Attorney ol Stockton In 1878 and 1879. 
is twice elected to the Superior Judgeship, and in 1886 
he was elected to the Supreme Bench of the State fur a 
twelve-year term. He resigned, though, in 1894, to n 
the practice of law. He opened offices in this city in part- 
nership with Attorney Arthur Rodgers. who recently passed 
away. Judge Slack became connected with the firm in 1898. 

Judge Paterson was one of the most brilliant attorneys in 
the State — not an orator, but thoroughly versed in the law. 
He bore a prominent part in the Fair case, the Kluge-Sutro 
contest, and many other o£ the most famous will cases. His 
practice was extensive, and he had clients all over the 
State. A widow and three children, Kelsey, the oldest daugh- 
ter. Marjorie, and Ogden Paterson, a young son, survive him. 

John Jay Scoville, a citizen long prominent in this State, 
died in San Francisco Saturday of heart disease. He was a 
native of Indiana, 57 years of age, and had resided in Cali- 
fornia for many years. Mr. Scoville was secretary of the 
Board of Directors of the Veterans' Home of California, and 
one of the best known members of the G. A. R. He served 
during the war from August. 1861, until May, 1865. The fun- 
eral was held from the headquarters of the George Thomas 
Post, G. A. R., and the interment was in the Thomas Post 
plat of the Presidio National Cemetery. 



W. F. Fisher, better known as the Grand Old Man of 
Napa County, met his deatn recently through an accident. 
at the age of sixty-eight. He was a pioneer from Ohio, who 
settled in the town of Calistoga over forty years ago, and 
grew up with the county of Napa. In early days he owned 
and ran the stage line to Lake County, and was known as 
<.ae most fearless driver on the road. The late Tiburcio 
Parrott and other men of note would have no other than 
Fisher handling, and his stock was always the wonder and 
admiration of connoisseurs of horse-flesh. He was also a 
shrewd man of business, and accumulated a large fortune. 
As a politician, he was always head and front of the Re- 
publican party in his county, and always presided as chair- 
man at conventions. He is accredited with moulding the 
fortunes of many Republican statesmen from Napa, anil his 
warm friends, Estee and Coombs, once owed much of their 
success to his efforts in their behalf. A jolly companion , 
and the life of any party he might be with, his purse was al- 
ways at the service of any friend in need. He leaves a 
widow and daughter, to whom is extended in their bereave- 
ment the sympathy of an unusually wide circle of friends all 
over the State. 



Dr. Wllley's Medical Discovery. 
Is the King of Pain and Balm of Gllead that has cured thou- 
sands of people. 



There is whiskey and whiskey, but only one "Jesse Moure 

Whiskey— the kind doctors recommend for its purity and health- 
fulness. 




NEAREST THE CITY 



5ummer Resorts 




Arcadia 

CAMPUS STATION 

SanlaOroi BfoanUdni 

Delightfully located 
half a mile from 
Big Trees. New 
hotel newly fur- 
nished. Electric 
lighted. Hot and 
cold water. Porce- 
lain tubs. 



J-ATH1NG, FISHING, HUNTING, TENNIS, Etc. 
Address THOMAS L. BELL, Felton P. O. 



BOWLING=== 



For the summer the Hotel Vendome management announces 
M111115 new attractions at that popular resort. Two magnificent 
8 wim miner pools are near the hotel, and guests may h«ve all the 
pleasures of seaside resorts. 

===swinniNQ 

Bowling;, coif, tennis and pine: ponff are araoner the nuny diver- 
sions. Johannsen's Orchesira will be there all the time. Auto- 
mobile coaching from the hotel throughout the valley. 

GEORGE P. SNELX, Manager. 

At Hotel Vendome, 

SAN JOSE. 



BAY STATE HOUSE AND COTTAGES 

Santa Ckuz— Sunny rooms, good table, best service; reason- 
able rates. MRS. L. MATHISON, Proprietress. 

BEN LOMOND Fark House and Cottages; an ideal re- 
sort, unsurpassed climate, drives, fish- 
ing and bunting, two hours' ride to Big Basin. Moderate prices. 
MRS. I. N. HAYES, Proprietor. 







MOTEL 
MATEO 

SAN MATtO 
CAL. 

WFjENN & SPrfULDING 
Prop'rs. 


A HIGH-CLASS SUMMER 
AND WINTER RESORT 


Reservations may now be 
made for August, Septem- 
ber, October, and the win- 
ter season. 



\A/U\ + £± CnUli^ ^«.-:.,,v^ SONOMA COUNTY CAL. 

White r>ulpnur springs romantic spot and cura- 
tive Wateks. 

These famous springs are located at the foot of Taylor Mountain, two-and- 
one-half miles south of Santa Rosa, The waters are valuable as a ouraiive 
In many ailments. The hotel and cottage are on an elevation overlooking 
Santa Rosa and the beautiful surrounding country. The climate is always 
delightful and invigorating. Accommodation for sixty. Fine drives, boating, 
billiard, croquet grounds, dancing pavilion, hunting and first-class table. 
Free sulphur baths, hot or cold. Rheumatism, blood, skrn and chronic dis- 
eases treated by competent Dhysician, Positive cure- Hamman bath in con- 
nection. Kates: adults, 8l0and8i2 per week; children under ten, half rates- 
Special rates to families. <"ake boat, Tlburon Ferry, 7:30 a, m. or 3:30 P m. 
Fare, 81.50 to Santa Rosa. Bus meets trains. Address: E. HAWES. White 
Sulphur Hpeings. Santa Rosa, Cal. Open all year around. Telephone: 
White Sulphur ^prinars. 

For best buffets, bars and sideboards and the medicine cabi- 
nets, "Jesse Moore"— pure rye or bourbon whisky— has no equal 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 




Sold 

everywhere 
in cans — 
all sizes. 
Made by 

Standard Oil 
Company 



BOOKS AND THEIR COOKING. 

In spite of the unprecedented sales of 
popular novels and the enormous cir- 
culation of popular periodicals in Amer- 
ica, the vast body of even the forceful 
and intelligent citizens of the coun- 
try care for nothing of literature. We 
love to talk about the pleasures and 
solaces of books. I have recently read 
a little collection of what we may call 
book-wooing extracts. It is very beau- 
tiful, very inspiring to hear what gen- 
tle and great readers and writers have 
said in praise of books, out I cannot 
think that all the world loves a book- 
lover any more than all the world loves 
books. "My days among the great dead 
are passed," cries Southey; "around me 
I behold where'er these casual eyes are 
cast the mighty men of old." All very 
real to Southey, doubtless, but as An- 
drew Lang remarks, in the words of 
Huckleberry Finn, "the public take no 
stock in dead people." And as he says 
somewhere else, some women are apt 
to regard with suspicion him who talks 
about books; it looks like he knew no 
people to talk about. 

The cheapening of books and the 
natural multiplication of books and per- 
iodicals have brought the instruments 
of information within the means of the 
poorest. In the cities the building of 
public libraries have made books eas- 
ier to obtain than anything else. And 
yet neither books nor papers nor librar- 
ies teach people to read or inspire them 
to think. If the thirsty Tantalus had 
been immersed in a deep pool of cool- 
est water his last state would have 
been worse than his first. Most people 
are not thirsty for books and yet we 
compel them to plunge in the broad 
and deep bookish waters. They dare 
not learn to drink lest they drown; 
those who aspire to drink deeply usually 
sink in confusion and dismay. 

As a nation we are suffering from 
mental indigestion. We know nothing 
of book manners. We behave at our 
book feasts very much like the dirty 
Ruggles children did in "Bird's Christ- 
mas Carol." We gormandize books and 
devour papers, then we rush off to busi- 
ness with our minds deadened by an un- 
assimilated and conglomerate mass. We 
never eat the same book, twice; we 
crave variety and insist upon highly 
spiced literary delicacies. We do not 
care to have nutritive mental food: all 



we demand is something pleasant that 
will pass the time and turn our thoughts 
from the absorbing cares of business. 

The book restaurants and kitchens 
are always open. They are wonderfully 
well equipped to supply the enormous 
demand. There are book hotels where 
you may find any dish you may desire 
and eat while you wait. Then there 
are the great cooks who turn out books, 
done to a turn, which they will send 
direct to your home. One of the most 
popular chefs is Mr. Winston Chur- 
chill. Mr. Irving Bacheller is another 
who prepares a rather plain dish that 
is relished after one has eaten scores 
of Mr. Richard Harding Davis's marsh- 
mallows. Mr. Davis is very popular 
with society women and matinee girls 
who like his bonbons. Women are also 
employed in the great bake-houses of 
books. Miss Mary Johnston, of Vir- 
ginia, has recently compounded a pala- 
table delicacy out of the herbs of her 
Southern fields and the leaves of her 
native tree. The calls for this confec- 
tion — the "Audrey" brand — have been 
marvelously many. f 

Each of these famous cookeries em- 
ploys a number of skilled writers who 
make out menu cards that are published 
in papers. These cards are works of 
art, and I, not infrequently, find more 
pleasure in reading than in realizing 
the virtues of the renowned cooks. 
There are certain groups of men who 
claim to be connoisseurs of the best 
bakery and make a business of tasting 
each new dish that comes out and then 
write about it in the paper that em- 
ploys them. They have eaten so much 
that they have no taste any more. 
Like the drunkard they have broadened 
their ability to discriminate by over- 
indulgence. But the public doesn't care 
very much, as the literary tasters and 
drunkards amuse them with stories of 
how the great cooks work, of how they 
live, of whom they love, and whom they 
marry. — R. Gray Williams in Things 
and Thoughts. 



"Although we've had prohibition in 
this State for twenty-one years," said 
the landlord of the Atlantic and Pacific 
Hotel, at Boomopolis, Kansas, in reply 
to the inquiry of a tourist from Con- 
necticut, "it don't 'pear to have injured 
the inickertous rum traffic to any seri- 
ous extent; and, besides that, it has 
been the means of insertin' into office a 
good many otherwise hopeless failures, 
whom in the ordinary course of events 
we might have been compelled to sup- 
poit by private subscriptions. Nope! 
Prohibition hain't such a frivolous in- 
stitution as you might think, if you just 
look at it in the right way." 






R» The Y/orldy Bc^rt Tonic 
Id Imported from Trinidad B.W.I. 



22 GOLD MEDALS 

LONDON 1862 LONDON 1886 

e PHILADELPHIA 1876 BUFFALO 1901 

| VIENNA ,873 p AR , s f \l? e 

.&) CHICAGO 1893 (_ 1900 

The Only Genuine 



Unrivalled appetizing louic and slom- 
och corrective, recommended by physi- 
cians. Lends the aromatic fragrance of 
the tropics to your liquor, and utrenirlh- 
ens t e jaded stomacb. Beware of cheap 
domestic substitutes and imitations. 
The ceii ui tie is made only by Dr. J. G. B. 
Sicken & Sons. 

J. W. WUP PERN ANN, Sole Agent, 
New York, N. >. 

Gray, Long & Strt h, Pacific Coast Acts.. 
Ban Francisco, Cnl. 



Quite a number of people would agree 
to follow the Golden Rule if everybody 
else would. 



SUNBEAMS 

(Stolen from Thieves. 

A beginner in newspaper work in a 
Southern town who occasionally sent 
stuff to one of the New York dailies 
picked up last summer what seemed to 
him a big story. Hurrying to the tele- 
graph office he "queried" the telegraph 
editor: "Column story on so and so. 
Shall I send?" 

The reply was brief and prompt, but 
to the enthusiast unsatisfactory. "Send 
BO words," was all it said. 

"Can't be told in less than 1,200," he 
wired back. Before long the reply 
came: 

"Story of creation of the world told 
in 600. Try it." 

His Son — Oppenheimer vants t'irty 
days gredit undt he vants der refusal 
ot der goots until to-morrow. Isaacs — 
If he vants t'irty days' gredit I vill 
give him a revusal righdt avay. Tell 
him I vouldn't sell him dem goots at 
all. 

Sidney — Then you believe in a coat- 
of-arms? Rodney — Yes. Almost any 
newly-rich American can be benefited 
by adopting a good Latin motto to live 
up to. 

She — Not very popular in the clubs, 
eh? He — I should say not. He knows 
when to quit in a poker game. 



The Favorite Champagne 

Moet&Ctyccndoa 

"WHITE SEAL." 
Dry.Deucate, Del/c/ous. 

The gain in importations of Moet & Chandon Champagne during L901 was 
equal to more than 100 per cenl of the combined increase of all other Champagne 

Houses.— "Jiunfort'a Wine & Spirit Circular:' 



August 2, 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




By Betsy Bird. 

Mrs. Salisbury is back from San Rafael, her social sea- 
son at that resort absolutely ruined in Its midst. She is 
greatly disappointed, for her presence at that suburb gave 
it much prestige, and many went over there on that account. 
The cruel laws of quarantine separated Miss Salisbury 
from her fiance, Mr. Danforth Boardman, and they com- 
municated with each other from across the street alone. 
Finally a week ago they met after the Salisbury house had 
been fumigated twice. Miss Azalea Keyes, who was to have 
passed the summer at San Rafael with the Salisburys, 
came back to town, and has gone to Howell Mountain with 
her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mts. A. S. Keyes. Her chap- 
eron, who was Miss Katherine Salisbury, is but little older 
than she. Mrs. Salisbury alone remained with her daugh- 
ter, and did not take the fever because she had no fear of 
it. 

Every one is feeling so sorry for one of last year's debu- 
tantes, Miss Kelsey Paterson, because her father died re- 
cently, and she is in mourning. She is such a bonny-faced, 
red-cheeked girl, with blue eyes and pretty light brown hair. 
She is tall, with a charming, round figure, and always in 
a good temper. She is one of the most popular girls of last 
season, and I think she kept her freshness the best of any 
of the debutantes, for she simply cannot look tired if she 
tries. She bears the very unusual Christian name of 
Kelsey. I believe the Patersons were very much disap- 
pointed because she was a girl, so they gave her a boy's 
name anyway. 

At first it seemed there was to be an interminable list 
of debutantes next season, but little by little the list is 
shortening, and I suppose it will end in there being about 
the usual number. Miss Mabel Toy has dropped out, for 
her grandmother, Mrs. Bovee, widow of ex-Mayor Bovee of 
Oakland, died, and the Toys are in mourning. Miss Toy is 
petite and dark, a charming, amiable and unspoiled little 
thing. 

. Then the Harvey girls are to remain in the convent at 
Vienna for two years, and they are not to be reckoned upon. 
Their mother does not believe in girls coming out until 
they are at least' twenty, and she thinks their Eastern social 
future will be better assured by that time. Mrs. Harvey, 
who was Miss Cutter of Los Angeles, was a jolly, popular 
girl in her school days, always ready for a laugh and a good 
time; but after she married, she began taking life very 
seriously, until no woman is spoken of with more bated 
breath than MVs. Downey Harvey. She cultivates a severe, 
austere demeanor, especially to social inferiors, and 
frightens to death those it does not freeze. However, with 
those possessing millions like her husband, she is very 
affable and amiable when she chooses to be. Mrs. Harvey's 
manner, aided by her husband's millions, has done a great 
deal to give the Martins, the half-brothers of her husband, 
the position they have in San Francisco. 

The young Jack Breckenridges have been visiting Mrs. 
Harry Mendell in San Rafael, who is a great friend of Mrs. 
Fred Sharon, the groom's mother. Mrs. Mendell is an ex- 
tremely popular woman, and her husband was in love with 
her before she married Henry Janin. When he heard she 
was free at the home of her parents in Massachusetts, he 
bombarded her with letters until she allowed him to come 
to see her. Then he carried her off bodily to San Fran- 
cisco, quite like the conqueror just come out of the West. 



V one is so distressed that Mrs. Bahroek. wife of 

:il Babcock, is i to Washington, but •vary 

i that the General has been promoted to 

be the chief of General Miles' ■taff. The BabCOCka are fa- 

lot ally as the Ideal couple. Mrs. Babcock is extremely 
pretty and charming, while the General la rerj hand 
nmi together they make a striking looking couple, Mrs. 
Babcoek has been petted tremendously, and is one of the 
army women most popular here. It is odd that both Colonel 
Mans and General Babcock, two of the best-liked officers 
that ever eame to San Francisco, should be ordered to Gen- 
eral Miles' staff. Colonel Mans is one of the aides, and his 
regiment has been ordered out of Washington, but I believe 
he may remain in Washington or go with it just as he 
pleases. Then Colonel O'Reilly has been sent to Washing- 
ton as Surgeon-General, and Miss O'Reilly is being warmly 
congratulated. She has not gone out a great deal here, for 
she has been in mourning, but she is a big, handsome, 
brown-eyed, black-haired girl. She is a great friend of 
Miss Edith McBean and all that set of girls. 
I hear there is one reason why Miss Pearl Landers is 




VARNEY W. GASKILL, Special Agent 

With HILBERT BROS., Importers 

TELEPHONE BUSH 25 SAN FRANCISCO 



The "CLAN riACKENZIE" 
7 Years Old 

Scotch Whisky 

Leader in Glasgow Exhibition 1901. Supplied to the largest shipping 
companies and hotels. " Is in great demand for High-Balls." 



G. R. MACKENZIE, 



GLASGOW 
FORBES BROS. 



LONDON LIVERPOOL 

AGENTS, 307 SANSOME STREET 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 



glaC. she is to be married within a few months, and that is 
so she can change her name from that of the pretty actress 
of the same name. It has been no little source of annoy- 
ance to her, and she is glad to be rid of it. I hear Mr. 
Landers went to the actress, who is not in reality named 
Landers, and offered her a sum of money if she would 
change her name, but she refused to do so. 



Mrs. Laura Roe is at Catalina Islands for a few weeks. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Harrison are passing some time at 
Tallac. Miss Florence Crittenden is studying at the Lane 
Hospital, with the view of becoming a trained nurse. Mrs. 
Boyd and Miss Louise Boyd are among the guests at Tal- 
lac. Mr. Avery McCarthy is visiting Miss Murison at Fruit- 
vale. Mrs. F. J. Kendall and Miss Isabel Kendall are hav- 
ing a holiday at Santa Cruz. Mrs. Asa Simpson is much 
better after his stay in Los Gatos. Mr. George Reddell is 
on a long fishing trip In Nevada. Mr. and Mrs. John C. 
Breckenridge are at Monterey. 

Mr. Harry C. Pendleton is at Agua Caliente Springs. Mrs. 
William G. Hitchcock, nee Drum, is the guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Drum of San i.iateo, where she will remain until 
tne end of the month. Miss Elizabeth McCall is spending 
two weeks at Guerneville, Sonoma County. Mrs. Gerald 
Cunningham is also at Guerneville. Miss Virginia R. Nokes 
and Miss Edith Melone are the guests of Miss Edith rlunt- 
ington at her home on Jackson street. Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
L. Van Wyck and Miss Gertrude Van Wyck are at the Hotel 
Rafael. 

Mrs. Gordon and Miss Sparhawk are passing two weeks 
at the Hotel Vendome, San Jose. Mrs. John Landers is 
spending a few weeks at Byron Springs. Mr. and Mrs. 
Grayson Dutton are at Lake Tahoe. Miss Marie Wells is 
at Agua Caliente. Mr. Andrew McCreery is one of the 
guests at Harbin Springs, Lake County. Mr. and Mrs. 
Worthington Ames are among the visitors at Tahoe. Mr. 
and Mrs. W. E. F. Deal and the Misses Deal are staying 
at the Sea Beach Hotel, Santa Cruz. Mr. and Mrs. H. W. 
Postlewait are passing the summer at Santa Cruz. 

Mr. Gaston E. Roussy is among the arrivals at Tahoe. The 
Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Foute are staying at Tahoe. Mr. James 
L. Crittenden is one of the visitors at Santa Barbara. Cap- 
tain Bertram C. Gilbert. U. S. A., is spending his leave of 
absence with the Daniel McLeods on Broadway. Miss 
Katherine Clark is at Menlo, the guest of Miss Elita Re 1- 
ding, who recently returned from Europe. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clinton E. Worden are at Lake Tahoe. Mr. and Mrs. Sam- 
uel Pond are visiting Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Pond at their home 
on California street. 

Miss Virginia Joliffe was visiting her sister, Mrs. Rudolph 
Spreekels, on her ranch in Sonoma county, and returned to 
this city August first. Mr. and MTs. Willard Drown are the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Drown in this city. Miss 
Gertrude Josselyn is staying a few weeks at Lake Tahoe. 
Dr. and Mrs. Palmer, and their daughters, Miss Gertrude 
and Miss May Palmer, are passing two weeks at Tahoe. 
Miss Crittenden of Oakland is visiting friends in Napa 
County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Duperu are staying at Lake Tahoe. 
Mr. and Mrs. George Crocker are in Europe. Mr. and Mrs. 
James Flood, Miss Flood and Miss Twiggs are back from 
Monterey. Mrs. John Jarboe is visiting friends in Napa 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Sumner Crosby of Boston are re- 
cent arrivals in San Francisco. Mrs. Crosby is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hooper of this city and Ala- 
meda. Mr. Crosby has just completed his course at the 
Harvard Law School. The young couple will live here in 
the future. 

Mr. and M'rs. I. W. Hellman are at Lake Tahoe for several 
weeks. Miss Pearl Landers is visiting her cousin. Miss 
Mabel Landers, at Monterey. Mrs. Francis Louis Stead- 
man is at Monterey. She is the cousin of the W. H. 
Crockers, and was recently their guest at Burlingame. She 



soon leaves for her home in South Bend, Indiana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles M. Keeney and Miss Innes Spotts Keeney 
are at Tahoe for the month of August. Mr. William Collier 
is at San Rafael for the summer. 

Miss Marie Louise Parrott has returned from the East, 
and joined her parents at Tahoe. Mr. and Mrs. Law- 
rence Irving Scott have returned from their trip to Lake 
Tahoe. Miss Bernie Drown spent a few weeks in Santa 
Cruz recently. Mr. and Mrs. George Boardman have re- 
turned to San Rafael from Del Monte. Mr. and Mrs. John 
Parrott, and their niece, Miss de Guigne, are back from 
Del Monte and are at San Mateo. Mr. and M'rs. George 
Shreve have returned from Tahoe, where they have spent 
several months. Mr. and Mrs. Latham McMullin are home 
from their visit to Lake Tahoe. Mr. and Mrs. H. M. A. 
Miller were hosts at a pleasant dinner during the past 
week. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Magee have returned after 
their long trip in the Sierras, most of which time they spent 
at Tahoe Tavern. Miss Grace Sperry and Miss Winifred 
Burdge of Oakland have gone to Lower California for a 
long trip. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Casserly were in town re- 
cently for a few days. 

Miss Janet Newlands, the daughter of Mr. Frank New- 
lands, will go to Beyreuth for the opera season. Dr. De 
Vecchi and wife gave a dinner recently for some friends. 
Mr. Robert Huie has gone East on a trip of several months 
to the Eastern and Southern States. M1\ Harry Holbrook 
spent a few days recently in Sacramento. Mr. Nicholas 
Kittle, who not very long ago was very ill in Fresno, was 
brought home to this city in a critical condition, but now 
he is much better. 

Miss Carrie Gwin has returned to the city and is at the 
Knickerbocker. Mr. and Mrs. Cary Friedlander, who have 
been at San Quentin for two months, will return to the city 
next week. Miss Frances Joliffe has returned from her 
visit to New York. Mrs. Edwin Dimond is home from her 
visit to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tobin at their country place 
near Calistoga. Captain and Mrs. W. H. Whiting have gone 
to Honolulu, where Captain Whiting is to have charge of 
the naval station. Mr. Harry Simpkins gave a yachting 
party Thursday a week ago at which he entertained Dr. 
and M'rs. George Goodfellow, Dr. and Mrs. John Rodgers 
Clark, Miss Katherine Clark, and Mr. Dick Tobin. 

Mrs. Zeila Nuttall and her daughter, Miss Nadine Nuttall, 
are staying at the Hotel Rafael. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Martin have returned to their cot- 
tage at Newport, Rhode Island. Mrs. Pennoyer of Oakland 
gave a reception last week in honor of Miss Juliette Wilbur 
Tompkins. Mr. Edward J. McCutcheon has been a guest 
at Klamath Hot Springs. Mr. Edward Preston has been 
staying at Tallac. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sprague have been entertaining Judge and 
Mrs. William Wallace. Mr. Lawrence Kip has arrived in 
Honolulu. The Misses McKinstry have returned from a 
visit to Mrs. Hyde Smith at San Mateo. Lieutenant Stan- 
ley Embick, U. S. A., has received orders to return to 
Fortress Monroe. 

Dr. C. C. Collins, U. S. A., will soon return from the 
East, and leave for Manila. Miss Gwinette Henley is ex- 
pected home this month from her visit to M'rs. A. J. Graves 
at Terminal Island. Should Mrs. Boalt decide to go abroaa 
she will remain indefinitely. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baldwin will occupy their cottage 

Visiting Cards 

Wedding Invitations 

and Announcements 
LE COUNT BROS. CO. 

533 MARKET STREET 



August 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



29 



•t Tahoe later In the season. Tho Dudley Hates, who are 
occupying tna Qarberdlni cottM* at Belvedere, wt) 

Baa Franrlsro early In the fall. Mr. an. I Mrs 
Otis are exported home from Kurope this month. Mrs. W. 
F. MrXmt and Miss Huth McNutt ulll soon go to Berkeley 
for a brief visit. Miss Edith Bindley will return trom Eu- 
rope in Oetober. Mrs. George Howard has taken a house 
in Paris, and her mother. Mrs. Schmieden, will spend the 
winter with her. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Weil have taken one of the cottages 
of the Hotel Rafael for the next two months. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Ivancovitch. daugh- 
ter of Mrs. C. Ivancovitch. and Mr. Harry F. Sullivan, son 
of Judge and Mrs. J. F. Sullivan. The wedding will take 
place before Easter. 

The wedding of Miss Edna Smart, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. George C. Smart, and Mr. Frederick Sherman, will 
take place August 6th at eight o'clock in St. John's Church 
Miss Florence Smart, sister of the bride, will be maid of 
honor, and the Misses Elsie and Claire Sherman, brides- 
maids. The groom will be attended by Mr. Lucerne A. 
Wittenmyer, and the ushers will be Mr. Harry J. Cox, Mr. 
Arthur B. Geissler, and Mr. Philip C. Clay. 

Mrs. George Raum gave a card party at the Hotel Rafael 
Friday a week ago. 

Mrs. George Doubleday, formerly Miss Alice Moffltt, who 
is visiting her family in Oakland, will return East about the 
middle of August. Mrs. Adam Grant will return to San 
Francisco the latter part of next week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer King and Miss King are among the 
present visitors at Tahoe. MVs. Gale gave a card party 
at her home in San Rafael Thursday last. Mr. Antoine 
Borel and his son have been in Los Angeles recently. Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Mendell have returned to their home in 
San Francisco after passing the summer in San Rafael. 
Captain White, U. S. A., has been visiting the family of 
Dr. White at Tahoe. Mrs. Frank Griffin, nee Follis, who 
Is passing the summer at San Rafael, had a severe shock 
Sunday last in being thrown from the carriage while out 
driving. 

Lieutenant Edward Zane, TJ. S. A., has returned to San 
Francisco, and is the guest of his aunt, Mrs. Loughborough. 
Mrs. Cadwallader and Miss Linda Cadwallader have re- 
turned from their visit to Tahoe. Sir Henry Heyman has 
been in Los Angeles during the past week. Miss Josephine 
Loughborough was the guest recently of Mrs. Frank Grif- 
fin in San Rafael. 

Judge Ward McAllister gave a delightful birthday dinner 
Monday evening last at the Hotel Rafael. Among those 
present were Mr. and Mrs. Fred Green, Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Fremont Older, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam B. Hopkins, and Mr. Truxton Beale. Mrs. S. Louise 
Bee gave a luncheon and theatre party Saturday afternoon 
last. 

Miss Mabel Craft gave a dinner at the Palace Grill recent- 
ly in honor of Mr. Vivian Burnett, son of Mrs. Frances 
Hodgson Burnett of New York. 

Mrs. Adam Grant entertained at an informal card party 
recently at Fairfax. 

Mrs. Leslie Allen Wright was hostess Monday a week 
ago at an al fresco luncheon at Fairfax. 

The following are among the guests at the Hotel Rafael: 
Mr. D. Montgomery, Mr. Leon Borqueras, Mr. W. L. Oliver, 
Fiorine Bachman, Mr. Carter Pomeroy, Mr. Truxton Beale. 
Mrs. Zeila Nuttall, Miss Nadine C. Nuttall, Mrs. B. Zeil. 



NOT NECESSARY TO GO ELSEWHERE! 

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Are Chief Purveyors of Everything Musical 

from Steinway Pianos to Ragtime Ditties. 



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SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Mr. Miles Baird, Mrs. Miles Baird, Mrs. M'arie Baldwin, 
Mr. David Baird, Mr. Eugene Goodwin and wife, Mrs. J. F. 
Goddard, Mr. Fred Goddard, Mr. Charles T. Sutton. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Morton of San Francisco are staying 
at the Hotel Rafael. 

J. S. Dillingham, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Wilcox and Miss 
E. Wilcox are among the Honolulu visitors registered at 
the Occidental this weeK. 

The second annual competition for the Women's Amateur 
Championship of the Pacific Coast will be held on the links 
at Del Monte commencing August 18th. The event will be 
open to all amateurs who are qualified under the by-laws of 
the Pacific Coast Golf Association and are members of 
clubs duly affiliated therewith. The entrance fee will be 
$3. The winner shall be the champion woman amateur 
golfers of the Pacific Coast of the year, and the trophy, a 
gold medal, shall be held for that year by the club from 
which the winner entered. On the same links, on August 
22, will be held the second Pacific Coast open championship 
for amateurs and professionals. Amateur winners will receive 
gold, silver and bronze medals, and professional winners 
will receive prizes of $100, $30 and $20. Entrance fee will be 
$3. The association has received railroad rates of one and 
one-third fares for the round trip for people attending the 
tournament. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Vesta Shortridge, 
daughter of Mr. Charles Shortridge, to Mr. Emil Bruguiere, 
son of the late E. A. Bruguiere. 



It is a pleasure to call for whisky and get a brand that Is 

not doctored or adulterated — something pure. "Jesse Moore" 
Whisky is guaranteed pure. 



A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth Patches, Bash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 53 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A. Say re said to a lady of the 
haut-ton (a patient): "As you ladies 
will use them. I recommend 'Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all druetiats and Faney-eoods 
Dealers in the United States, Canadas 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 

37 Great Jones Btreet, N, Y. 




30 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 



Campaign Echoes 



Mr. Scipio Craig, of the Redlands Citrograph, is one of 
something like thirty (out of three hundred and fifty Re- 
publican, Independent-Republican, and Independent) Re- 
publican journalists in this State who are opposed to the 
renomination of Governor Gage. In a recent issue of his 
paper he admits that "it looks— on the face of it— probable" 
that the Governor will be renominated, but he warns "the 
bosses who expect to dominate the convention through their 
corrupt machinations in the large cities" that "they are in- 
viting disaster;" that "they are going to defeat," if this 
nomination is made. All this is very dreadful, and it is 
worth enquiring what foundation it rests upon. Is it the 
muttering of a person who is besotted with personal pre- 
judice, or is it the utterance of a clear-headed man who is 
capable of taking a broad-minded view of a somewhat com- 
plicated situation? We will let Mr. Craig's own language 
answer that alternative query. In the article now under 
consideration he says: 

"We oppose Mr. Gage's renomination because, from visits 
over the State, from personal interviews and letters received 
from strong Republicans of many years' standing, Republi- 
cans who have previously labored for the success of the 
party from unselfish motives, have all said they could not. 
and would not, support him, should he be renominated. 
Some have said frankly that they would vote against him. 
Others say they don't know how to vote for a Democrat, 
but they cannot and will not vote for Henry Gage." 

There is an amusing confusion of syntax in that para- 
graph, but still its meaning is apparent. It is an old story. 
It is the same kind of fanfaronade that the Call and Chron- 
icle have been engaging in for months past. And the impli- 
cation it is designed to convey is absolutely untrue. There is 
no considerable number of Republicans who feel that way 
toward Governor Gage. There is a fractional minority of 
his fellow partisans who are imbued with that rule or ruin 
spirit, but it is hardly to be expected that the vast major- 
ity will bow to the imperious will of a fractional minority. 
If Mr. Craig will clear the cobwebs out of his brain, he will 
discover that the "visits," "personal interviews," "letters 
received," and "strong Republicans," which have alarmed 
him, are, like Falstaff's men in buckram, largely creations 
of the imagination. 

« • » 

It is worthy of note, in connection with the foregoing 
remarks, that Mr. Craig claims to be "a warm personal 
friend of Mr. Gage." He shows his warm personal friend- 
ship by quoting from the Pomona Times (another of the 
thirty anti-Gage Republican papers) to this effect: 

"The vast majority of Gage's opponents believe him. after 
over three years' trial, to be unfit for Governor and a dis- 
credit to the party and State and will not vote for him if 
nominated." 

This slanderous and untruthful assault he personally 
endorses with the statement that it is the "congealed truth." 
That is a strange kind of warm personal friendship; indeed, 
it would seem as though the warm personal friendship 
which finds an agreeable expression in a denunciation of its 
object as "a discredit to the party and State," and "unfit 
to be Governor," should be preserved in the Smithsonian 
Institute. It is too valuable a curiosity to be left running 
at large in Redlands. Nor does Mr. Craig's warm personal 
friendship end there, for he winds up the article now under 
consideration by speaking of the Governor's probable re- 
nomination as "an unclean thing" which the "unpurchas- 
able country vote" will spew "out of their mouths." In the 
warmth of his desire to knife his "warm personal friend," 
Mr. Craig seems to have forgotten common sense as well 
as the syntaxical rules of the language and has given us 
a disgusting exhibition of ignorance, absurd logic and sneak- 



ing hypocrisy. He is a fair sample of the kind of Republi- 
cans who are exhibiting a bitter personal hostility to Gov- 
ernor Gage's aspirations, and his methods are similar to 
their methods. 

The Call, having succeeded, with the assistance of a large 
array of high-class counsel, and through a fictitious appeal 
to the Supreme Court of the United States that will be dis- 
missed the moment it is reached, in tying up the criminal 
libel proceedings brought by Governor Gage, in regard to 
its San Quentin publications, now professes great anxiety 
to proceed with the examination at once in order that it 
may have an opportunity to produce the evidence with 
which it proposes to sustain its charges, before the primary 
election takes place. This is a cold-blooded bluff of the 
rawest kind, and will deceive no one. The truth is that the 
paper has no evidence that would be received in a court 
of law in which the Judge was not afraid of the venomous 
ill-will of itself or its associates. It has no evidence of 
any other nature than that which it has already published 
and which consisted altogether of inuendo, implication and 
insinuation. If it is really in earnest in its desire for a 
hearing all it has to do is to dismiss its sham appeal and 
proceed with the examination before the court in which 
Governor Gage instituted his proceedings. The paper offers 
to stipulate that, in the event of its collusive case before 
Judge Fritz being permanently prohibited, it will go to a 
hearing before a Los Angeles Superior Judge, provided 
Governor Gage will stipulate to abide by the decision of 
Judge Sloss in the collusive case. This is a very frank 
and open-hearted offer to engage in a game of "heads 1 
win, tails you lose." Its reluctance to go to a hearing before 



THE VENERABLE DR. CHAS. D. CLEVE- 
LAND, 600 Leavenworth St., City, writes under 
date of July 28 ult., as follows: 

The chemical constituents of iEtna Mineral Water are decid- 
edly benelicial to health, and are well calculated I to promote dlirea- 
tion. favor activity of the seorcliuns and eliminate peccant liumors 
rom the blood." 

Hundreds of other eminent physicians have testi- 
fied to the excellent curative properties of 



^ETNA 



MINERAL 
WATER 



Bottled at Aetna Springs, Napa Co., Cal. 



Phone 
South 51 



AND 

ORDER 
A CASE. 



/ETNA MINERAL WATER CO. 

7 TENTH ST., 
SAN FRANCISCO. 





BEFORE leaving the 




city for your summer 




vacation you had bet- 


A 


ter store your value 




ables in the Vaults of 


Wise 


the 


Precaution 


CALIFORNIA SAFE [II [SIT 




AND TRUST COMPANY 




Cor, Californla&Montijoiiiory Ht. 




San Francisco 



August 2. 1902. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



31 



a Judge wbo Is outside of the coercive iaflamm of the 
stinkpots y Itself or the I.os Angela Times Is 

w ilrtln , 

• • • 

On Monday last the Chronicle announced that a political 
machine which Is neither Democratic nor Republican Is 
seeking to compass the renominatlon of Governor Gage. 
This, the paper declares, 'is shown by the persistent re 
fusal to permit the investigation of San Qucntin Prison af- 
ter the publication of documents which. If not contradicted. 
show actual fraud." If this be true, the Call must be a 
part of the machine, for its managers are the ones who have 
refused to permit the investigation. The Prison Directors 
vet a day for beginning the investigation, but the paper did 
not show up. Governor Gage commenced libel proceedings 
which would have operated as a judicial investigation, and 
the paper has resorted to every technical device possible 
to prevent or postpone a hearing. This is the second time 
the Chronicle has blundered over that dreadful machine. 
It appears to be suffering from machine on the brain. 

• • * 

The editor of a weekly paper, who long ago announced 
his intention of espousing the Democratic cause (but post- 
poned the nuptials on account of the difficulty he encoun- 
tered in identifying the bride), declares that Governor Gage 
could have commenced his libel proceedings in any county 
in the State, and that the fact that he chose San Pedro. 
where he once resided, and where the people are so friendly 
to him that an unprejudiced jury could not be obtained, 
shows a disposition to cinch, or take an unfair advantage of, 
the defendants. We thought that the Constitution re- 
stricted the Governor to a choice of two counties; we 
thought, also, that the Wilmington Dogberry would only 
examine into the case, and that if the defendants were held 
to answer they would be tried at the county-seat by a jury 
drawn from all over the county. However, a readiness 
to espouse the Democratic cause may distort one's vision 
and present things to one's understanding in a fantastic 
shape. 

• * * 

Attorney-General Ford has announced his intention of 
resigning his office when the Republican Convention has 
named a candidate to succeed him, provided that the new 
man will undertake to retain the present office force. The 
proposition is a rather original one. It is equivalent to an 
offer of four months' tenure of the principal position in re- 
turn for the patronage of the office for four years, in ease 
the nominee is elected. Mr. Ford has evidently a keen 
appreciation of the best end of a bargain. 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



THE NEW ELECTRIC-LIGHTED OVERLAND LIMITED 
Is a revelation in the art of car building. Every want seems 
to have been foreseen. Each seat is provided with an ad- 
justable electric reading lamp so that one can read either 
sitting or reclining. The highest taste has been shown in 
the choice of soft tones in the decoration of the walls and 
ceilings, with which the carpets and upholstery match per- 
fectly. The traveling branch of the Book-Lovers Library in 
the composite car will prove a great convenience, as mem- 
bers can take a book onto the train, exchange it there, and 
take another with them when they leave. Telephone ser- 
vice by special wire is provided up to the hour of depart- 
ure at the terminals, a special operator being in attendance 
in the observation car at the rear of the train. The train 
leaves San Francisco at 10:00 a. m., daily, and reaches Chi- 
cago In three days. Secure descriptive booklet at Southern 
Pacific Information Bureau. 613 Market St., San Francisco. 



Tesla Briquettes, the popular domestic fuel, are only 

$6.00 per ton. Full weight guaranteed. In economy, cleanli- 
ness and heat-producing qualities Briquettes are superior to 
coal. Sold by the Tesla Coal Co., 10th and Channel. 'Phone, 
South 95. 



The immense patronage of the Grand Hotel Cafe. 

Fay & Foster, proprietors, Is evidence that the business men 
and club men of San Francisco appreciate a good thing. 
Mercantile lunch from 11 to 2 daily. 



The very center of the city, convenient to all the 
big stores and all places of amusement. Euro- 
pean plan, $1 a day and upwards. 

23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square Park.) Milton Robltt. 

Finest cafe in this city. 



New Hotel Bellevue 

European Plan Central Location 

BEACON ST., near Tremont, BOSTON 

HARVEY & WOODS, Proprietors. 



HOTEL EMPIRE 

Broadway and 63d St. 

New York Gity 



A Hlffh Class Exclusive Hotel 
conducted on the European 
plan at moderate rates. 
Accessibly and Deliirhtfully located. 
W. Johnson Qoinn, Proprietor. 




RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C. 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 



of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. 
O. G. Staples, President; G. Devitt. Treasurer. 
American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 



OTTO NORMAN'S 



Every delicatessen 

Domestlo and Imported Beers 



Lunch 

Cafe 

After the Theatre 

Bush St.. above Kearny 



'I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in.' 



— Db. Shbady, 274 Lexington avenue. New Yoru 
L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 
Send for Pamphlet. 418 Sacramento St 

Worthington Ames 

Member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In stocks, bonds and municipal securities. 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street. Tel. Main 1381. 



Gray Bros. 



Hay ward Bid?., California and Montgomery 

streets, San Francisco. 

205 New Hich Street, Los Angeles 

Concrete and artificia 
stone work. 



THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 



Manufacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1 897 

421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 389 



32 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 2, 1902. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC C0.--PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Trains leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 

[Main Line. Foot of Market St.] 

lkavf] From June 22, 1902 [ahriye 

7:00 a Bentala, Sulsun, Rloilra, and Sacramento 6:55 r 

7:00 A VacaviHe, Winters. Rumsey 7:55 P 

7:30 a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa. Calls toga, Santa Rosa... 6:25 p 

8:00 A Davis, Woodland. Knights Landing, Maryeville, Orovllle 7:55 p 

8:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogdenand East 8:25 A 

8:00 a Nlles, Lathrop, Stockton „ 7:25 p 

8:00 a Nlles, Mendota, Hanford. Vlsalla, Portervllle 4:55 p 

8:30 a Shasta Express — Davis, Williams, (for Bartlett Springs), Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland 7:55 p 

8:30 A San Jose. Livermore. Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville, 

Marysvllle.Chlco, Red Bluff. 4:55 P 

8:S0a Oakdale, Chinese, Sonora. Tuolumne..-. 4:25P 

»:00 a Vallejo 12:25 p 

9:00 A Los Angeles Express — Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop. Stockton, 

Merced. Raymond, Fresno, and Los Angeles 8:25 A 

9:80 A Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 7:55 p 

10:00 A Hay wards, Nlles and way stations fl2:55 p 

10:00 a The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago 5:2? p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers (11:00 p 

3:00 p Benlola. Winters. Sacramento, Woodland. Williams, Willows, 

Knights Landing, Maryeville. Orovllle 10:55 A 

3:30 p Hay wards. Nlles. and way stations 7:55 P 

4:00 p Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, Santa Rosa..... 9:2S a 

4:00 p Nlles. Llvermore. Stockton, Lodl 12:25 P 

4:30p Hay wards. Nlles, San Jose. Llvermore t8:55 a 

4:80 p The Owl Limited— Fresno. Tulare, Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles 8.55 A 

5:00 p Port Costa. Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton 10:25 A 

5:00 p Martinez, Antioch, Stockton. Merced, Raymond Fresno., 12:2> p 

tSrSO pNiles Local 735 A 

6:00 p Haywards. Nlles. and San Jose 7:65 a 

tfl-00p Vallejo 11:25 a 

8:00 p Oriental Mall— Ogden, Denver, Omaha. St. Louis, Chicago... 4:35 F 

7:10p San Pablo. Port Costa, Martinez, and way Btatlons 11 -25a 

17:00 p Vallejo 7:55 p 

8:05 p Oregon and California Express — Sacramento, Marysville. Red- 
ding, Portland. Puget Sound, and East 8:55 A 

19:10 p Hayward and Nlles til £5 a 

Coastline: (Narrow Gauge). {Footof Market St.) 

t7:45 a Santa Cruz Excursion - — t8:05 P 

8:15 A Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz, and way stations 5:50 p 

t2:16 p Newark, Centervllle. Han Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek. Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 10:50 a 

4:15 p Newark. San Jose, Los f?atos f8:50 A 

ft4:15p San Jose. Los Gatos. Santa Cruz ffi:50A 

OAKLAND HARBOR FERRY 

From Saw Francisco — Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
A.H. 1:00.8:00.5:15, p.m. 

From Oiklinp- Foot of Broadway.— 16:00. 18:00. t8:05, 10:00 A, h. 12:00, 
i:00. 4:00 p.m. 

Coast ltne (Broad Gauge). (Third and Towneend streets.) 

*:10 a San Jose and way stations 6:30 r 

t7:00A San Jose and way stations 7:30 r 

f7:00 a New Almaden.. /4 10p 

t7:l5 A Monterey Excursion $8:30 p 

fl:00 a Coast Line Limited— San Jose. Gilroy, Hollister. Salinas. San 

Luis Obispo. Santa Barbara. Los Angeles and Prlnolpat inter- 
mediate stations 10:45 p 

9:00 A San Jose. Tres Plnos. Santa Cruz. Paolnc Grove, Salinas, San 

Luis Obispo, and principal Intermediate stations 4:10 p 

10:80 A San Jose and way stallons 8:AQ a 

ITSn a San Jose. Los Gatos and way stations 5:30 p 

ai:R0p San Jose and way stations ■-- O7:00p 

t2:0Tp San Jose and way stations t«:00 a 

•8 00 pDc! Monte Express— Only stops San Jose t'2:01 p 

3 30 p San Mateo. Redwood. Palo Alto. Santa Clara, San Jose, Tres 

Plnos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Del Monte. Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove 10:45 a 

4:30 P San Jose and principal way stations ... 1 :30 p 

t6:00 p San Jose. Los G*»to«, and principal way stations 9:00 a 

6 : 80 p San Jose and principal way stations lOO^A 

t6;15 p San Mateo. Belmont. Redwood. Menlo Park. Palo Alto t^:46 * 

6:30p San Jose and way stations 6:3Ha 

7:00 p New Orleans Express — San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara. Los 

Angeles. Doming, El Paso. New Orleans, and East... 10:15 a 

«11:45 p Palo Alto and way stations t9:45 p 

aii;45 p San Jose and way stations J9:45 p 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon . t Sundays excepted- 

t Sundays only. f Tuesdays and Fridays. a Saturdays only. 

^Saturday and Sunday only, ^Monday only. 

"Dally except Saturday. 

The Union Teansfbh Company will cmtl for and chook baggage from 
hotels and residences Telephone. Exchange HI, Enoutre of Ticket Agents 
for Time Cards and other Information. 

Chicago |N less than 3 Days 



FROM SAN FRANCISCO 



AT 10 A. M. 



CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC AND 

NORTH-WESTERN LINE 

Double Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars, Buffet, Smoking: and 
Library Cars, with barber. Dining Car«— meala a la carte. Daily 
Touriat Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every 
week from San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 

R. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

ttL7Market St. Palace Hotel, San Francisco 



CAL N. W. RY. CO., Le ""» S. F. ■"<• N. P. RY. CO. 

SAM FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tmnox Fnxy — Foot of Hitk.1 8tr»t 
WBBKDAT8-7aO. 9:00. 11:00 *.*.; 1235,8:30.5:10.6:80 p.k. Thur«day.- 
SUNDAYS— 8:00 8:30. 11:00 a.m.: ISO, 3:80. 5:00. 6:20 r.u. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO 

Extra trips at 1 a5 and 6:85 P.M. 

SUNDAYS-8:10,9:40 11:10 a.m., 1:40.8:10 5:05, 6:25 P.M. 

Between San pranclsoo and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 

Leave San FranoUoa | In Effect Apr. 28. 1901 I Axrlveat San FranoUoo 



Week day. 
7:80 AM 
3:30 PM 
6:10 PM 


Sunday. 
8:00 AM 
9:30 AM 
5:00 PM 


Destinations 

Novato 

Petal urns 

Santa Rosa 


Sundays 1 Week days 
10:40 ah I 8:40 am 
8:05 Ptf lOlW AM 
7:35 pm 1 6:30 pk 


7:30 AM 
3:30 PM 


5:00 PM 

8:00 AM 


Fulton, WlndHor. 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyservllle. Cloverdale 


10:40 AM | 1036 AM 
7:35 Pm 1 6:20 Pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


S-jSoI"- | Ho„,and.™.n | »[JJ « | \™ « 


7:30 am 
830 PM 


6 ;2° p " | Guemev,.!. | »g £ | !•* « 


7:30 am 
5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 1 Sonoma 1 9:15 AM 1 8:40 A" 
6:w pk i Glen Ellen | o:ob pm | e:20 fm 


7:80 am 
8:30 Pm 


!S{- | Sebaatopo, | 10;g J- | MA, 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



Aug 



Steamers leave San Fran- 
cisco as follows: 

W^ For Ketchikan. Juneau, Trendwell's, Douglas City. 

<Bs^ Skaouay, etc.. Alaska, II a. m-: Aug. 4. 9, 1 1. 19, 2 I. 29; Sept, 

■dsy^^ :: - Change to company's steamers fit Seattle. 

bbTsbbwW^ For R - <: - nnd p "e«l Sound Ports. II 

■^HJW i. ''. 14. 19, 24, 21': Sept. 3- 

Hs^gl^U For Eureka f Humboldt Bay), 1:80 p. M. Aug. 5. 10. 15 

^^M -i», 30; Sept. i. 

^ For Los Angelas (via Port Los Angeles andRedondo), 
San Diego and Santa Barbara, " Santa Rosa," Sundays, 9 a . m. 
State of California. Thursdays: 9 a. m. 

For Los Angeles, via San Pedro and Bast San Pedro, Santa Barbara, 
Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Simeon, Cayuoos, Port Harford (San Luia 
Obispo) Ventura, Hueneme. and 'Newport. ('Corona only.) 

Corona, 9 a. m.. Aug. 6. 14. 22. 30.; Sept. 7. 
Coos Bay, 9 a. m., Aug. 2. 10. 18, 26; Sept. 3. 
For Mexican Ports, 10a.m„ 7th of each month- 
For further information obtain folder. 
Right Is reserved to change steamers or sailing dates. 

TICKET OFFICE— 4 New Montgomery street (Palace Hotel). 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen. Agte. 
0. D. DUNANN, Gen. Passenger Agent. 

10 Market St., San Francisco. 



The Pacific Steam Navigation Co. 

Incorporated Under Royal Charter 1840. 
— and— 

Compania Sud-Americana De-Vapores 

Firat-CIass Twin Screw Passenger Steamers 

From SAN FRANCISCO to Mexico. Central America, Panama, Guayaquil 

Callao, Valparaiso, and all Ports on the East and West 

Coast of South America. 

Sailing from Howard 3, Pier 10, 12 M. 

Pebu August 1, 1902 

Guatemala August 9. 1902 

Colombia August 20, 1902 

Abbquipa Sept. — , 1902 

These steamers are built expressly for Central and South American pas- 
senger service. (No change at Panama.) Freight and passenger office, 316 
California Street. 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE «fe CO., General Agents. 

S3 "Alameda." for Honolulu, Sat. Aug. 2, 2 p. m. 

SS "Sierra," for Australia. Thura- Aug.14, 10 a. m- 

SS "Mariposa." for Tahiti, Tuea , Aug. 20, 10 a. m. 

Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Capetown. 

South Africa, 
r J. D. SPRECKELS Sc BROS. CO. 

(OfflBulUr* Agents. 6-13 Market Street. Freight Office, 3'27 
Wr* 1 *^ Market St.. San Francisco. 





Illinois Central 
Railroad 



EFFICIENTLY SERVES 
A VAST TERRITORY 



DIRECT CONNECTION WITH 

OVERLAND LIMITED at Omaha for Chicago and points East: 

with SUNSET LIMITED at New Orleans for Louiiville. 

Cincinnati and points East. 

POUR PERSONALLY CONDUCTED EXCURSIONS WEEKLY 



H. SNEDAKER, GENERAL AGENT 
648 Market El., Sao Franclsoo, Cal. 



?rlc«, 10c par copy. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, I860. 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 



©alif or ttiOii »* rti ser. 




Vol. 1.XV. 



SAN RANCISCO. AUGUST 9, 1902. 



Number 6. 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER Is printed and Pub- 
lished every Saturday by the proprietor. Frederick Marriott, 
llalleck hullilir .me street. San Francisco. Cal. 

Entered ftt San Francisco Postofhce :is second-cl&SS matter. 

New York Office— (where Information may he obtained regarding 
subscriptions and advertising!— yn Broadway. C. C. Murphv, 
Representative. 

London Office— 30 Cornhlll. E. C. England. George Street & Co. 
Representative. 

Boston— 36 Bloomfleld street. W. H. Daggett, representative 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter in- 
tended for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LETTER should he sent to this office not later than 5 p. m 
Thursday previous to dav of Issue. 



General Miles has received his regular weekly snub from 
Washington, and all is quiet in army circles. 



The city of Cleveland is to get 3-cent fares— another Indi- 
cation that Mayor Tom Johnson will run for President. 



Condensed wine is the latest scientific discovery. If it 
results In condensed jags, it may be of some benefit to 
the world. 



The dressmakers who have gotten together and formed a 
trust are ardent believers in the maxim that a stitch in time 
saves nine. 



The bones dug up in the cellar of the White House he- 
tray the fact that there has been a skeleton in some presi- 
dential closet. 



The plans for an air ship race at the St. Louis Exposition 
are not so much up in the air as they might have been 
two or three years ago. 



E. Ballentlne, the man who swallowed his false teeth 
last week, is now complaining of biting pains in the pit of 
his stomach. 



The Turkish party which is imprisoning the Sultan's 
heirs must needs be infused with an industry passing that 
of the average Mohammedan. 



If the police don't catch White, what's the matter with 
jailing a few of his superiors, whose criminal carelessness 
made his thievery possible? 



Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan has just purchased a London 
house on Grosvenor street. His prospective neighbors are 
thankful that he didn't buy Grosvenor street. 



It's lucky that Secretary Root's board' of army officers 
didn't wait for a foreign invasion to show us that our coast 
defenses are obsolete and worthless. 



So much Venetian architecture is falling lately that it is 
nothing for the passing gondolier to be swamped by a ton 
of priceless antique bricks. 



Ex-President Cleveland is announced as one of the largest 
landowners in Massachusetts. The "largest" can he applied 
to either the owner or the holdings. 



Mr. Harry de Windt, the Siberian explorer now In the city, 
says that if De Wtadt had not been stronger than the wind 
he wouldn't be here to tell about it. 



$20,000 secured by bandits from a C. B. & Q. express mes- 
senger last week stands as irrefutable evidence that train 
robbery still continues to be a profitable profession. 



Mr. Russell Sage celebrated his eighty-sixth birthday 
Monday by putting in a good, hard day's work. Mr. Sage 
expects to amass quite a 'dy little sum before he grows old. 



New Hampshire politicians say that Mr. Winston Chur- 
chill will go to Congress in two years. Let us see if the 
young man can make politics as well as he can write about 
them. 



The colossal war game to be waged between the entire 
army and navy will not be complete unless President Roose- 
velt comes out and shows us what really happened at San 
Juan Hill. 



Mr. Henry James, Jr., complains that striking West Vir- 
ginia is a country of injunction. If that State had not 
been a country of injunctions the savage miners wouldn't 
have left enough of West Virginia to enjoin against. 



A Fort Sheridan corporal met a restaurant cashier at 
3 : 20 p. m. ; at 3 : 51 they were married and at 4 : 20 he received 
the news of a $25,000 legacy. At this rate he should have 
blown in his $25,000 by 5:15, and gotten divorced by 5:27. 



According to all reports the water cure and the liquor 
curse seem to go hand in hand in the Philippines. With 
the cholera to help out, we will soon have undisputed pos- 
session. 



A Texas man who had three names, was arrested on five 
charges of horse-stealing, and convicted twice, committed 
suicide. It is said that he lost his reason trying to figure 
out the number of years coming to him. 



It is said that the hoy-beating father, Charles Roemer, 
cannot be tried in Alameda because of the prejudice against 
him. Alamedans must be sensitive. Why turn against a 
man who has merely tried to flay his son with a yard of 
knotted cable? 



Captain Strong said that he would take his life If Maysle 
did not arrive in Paris. Maysie arrived. She didn't find 
the Captain, however. Perhaps he kept his threat. If so, 
the world breathes a sigh of relief and goes on to the next 
scandal. 



Senator Kearns of Utah Is buying hundreds of thousands 
of dollars' worth of expensive furniture, principally because 
he expects a visit from President Roosevelt. The President 
would probably prefer a good round-up or a family quarrel 
at a Mormon elder's household. 



Ten years ago Harry Dockstadter disowned his daughter 
because she disobeyed him and married a man he didn't 
like. Last week the daughter drove In state into Fresno, 
found the old man In the Soldiers' Home, and took him away 
to spend his last years in wealth and luxury. And the moral 
of this story is: Disobedience is sometimes a practical 
form of filial affection. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 9, 1902. 



AS TO THE FRIARS. 
Certain jealous divines in our Eastern States, especially 
in New England, are preaching sermons from a text not to 
be found in the Bible. It is that: "The friars must go." 
These preachers had much better keep quiet. The less said 
about the question by them the easier it will be of settle- 
ment. If it is to be made a religious factional fight, heaven 
only knows where it will end. As a matter of fact, the ex- 
pulsion or buying out of the Philippine friars in response to 
the feelings of the native Roman Catholic population is far 
from being an anti-Roman Catholic movement, but can be 
made to seem so by too much yelling in Protestant pulpits 
that "the friars must go." The Filipino people do not ob- 
ject to the friars because of their religion, but rather be- 
cause of their lack of it. They were allowed by Spain for 
generations to lord it over the people with a high hand. 
They taxed, punished and robbed the people without let 
or hindrance, and the fact has been made abundantly clear 
that peace never can be maintained in the Philippines as 
long as the friars remain. It is the outcries of a down-trod- 
den people, and not the pulpit's desire for proselytes that 
will cause them to "go." The very last thing wanted by 
anybody, and especially by the administration, is the stir- 
ring up of religious feeling and prejudice in home politics 
over the Philippines. That is a question pregnant with 
difficulty as it stands. Archbishop Ireland, who has so 
often proved himself a good American, has thought it 
necessary to calm those American Catholics who are suspi- 
cious that the administration's Philippine policy is anti- 
Catholic. The Archbishop of St. Paul knows his church in 
America, and if he thinks it necessary to come out in protest 
against the charge that the American occupation of the 
islands practically means a proselyting expedition, it is 
certain that the charge meets considerable acceptance in 
Roman Catholic circles, and is in danger of becoming a 
controlling motive in polities. At the same time the Arch- 
bishop is known to be so close to the administration and 
so loyal to his church, that his word will go far to allay 
suspicion, if only Protestant clergymen refrain from stirring 
them up. 

HOW AMERICAN PROTECTION IS BEING MADE TO 
WORK. 

The Springfield Republican has published some aston- 
ishing figures showing how American protection is being 
made to work in the interests of the foreigner at the ex- 
pense of the home consumer. Those figures go far to show 
that protection has had its day, and completed its work, as 
President McKinley, the greatest protectionist of them all, 
so clearly pointed out in his last speech. The Republican 
shows that there is a combine among exporters, and that 
they have in common a schedule of prices charged at home 
and abroad, from which it extracts the following: 

American Price to 
Price. Foreigners. 

Wire nails (keg) $ 2.25 J 1.30 

Wire rope (coil) 12.00 5.00 

Lead (100 lbs.) 4.00 2.00 

Shovels (dozen) 7.50 5.80 

Axle grease (pound) 08 .04 

Washboards (dozen) 3.00 1.70 

Meat choppers 2.70 1.50 

Barbed wire (100 lbs.) 3.00 2.20 

Clocks (alarm) CO .30 

Lawn mowers 4.25 2.75 

Fruit jars (dozen) 80 .55 

Typewriters 100.00 55.00 

Sewing-machines 40.00 17.00 

Tin plate (100 lbs.) 4.19 3.19 

The average price to foreigners is about forty per cent 
under that to American consumers, and it is stated that 
even these quotations to the export trade are general, and 



subject to further reduction in special cases; that is to 
say, they are not the quotations given in special discount 
sheets of the exporting firms and associations, for a sight 
of which the Democratic National Campaign Committee has 
offered a large reward without finding anybody, so far, 
to claim the money. Better campaign material it would be 
difficult to imagine. It is absolute demonstration of the fact 
that foreigners are securing the benefit of our protective 
tariff, and at the cost of our own people. Another singular 
fact is that these quotations go far to simplify the hitherto 
complex problem of our balance of trade. We appear to 
have about $500,000,000 a year balance of trade in our favor. 
Yet no gold comes this way to pay for it. But the secret 
is out when it is known that these figures are compiled by 
the Treasury Department, and are based upon the home 
quotations. If they were reduced, as they ought to be, 
about forty per cent on the articles favored, away would go 
much of our apparent balance of trade. If it were possible 
to get at the figures of the total of manufactures sold for 
home consumption, it would be found that the charges in 
excess of those paid by the foreigner would be something 
stupendous, and that would be the price we are paying for 
a system of protection that clearly is no longer necessary. 
The higher our tariff the larger the discount our manufac- 
turers could afford to allow the foreigner. We have only 
to let Mr. Dingley try his hand once more at fixing a tariff, 
and it would b possible to let the foreigner get his goods 
for nothing. The tariff issue cannot be whistled down the 
winds much longer. 



HEARST AS A MAKER OF HEROES. 
In one way, the Hearst papers are useful: just as sure 
as they champion a cause, that cause is bound to be made 
ridiculous. Through the hysterical overpraise of their deeds 
by these journals, even the most ignorant are beginning to 
see the humorous side of Hobson, the kissing-bug. Windy 
Bob Evans, Funston, the loquacious swimmer of rivers, and 
Dewey, the talkative admiral. Their stars arose in